(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Armstrong State College Catalog"

»pfB " 

■■*-'■■■ 

.-'..;■■■ *-; 





ARMSTRONG 
5TATE COLLEGE 

Undergraduate Bulletin 
1979-1980 

Savannah, Georgia 



The statements set forth in this Catalogue are for informational purposes 
only and should not be construed as the basis of a contract between a 
student and this institution. 

While the provisions of this Catalogue will ordinarily be applied as stated, 
Armstrong State College reserves the right to change any provision listed in 
this Catalogue, including but not limited to academic requirements for 
graduation, without actual notice to individual students. Every effort will 
be made to keep students advised of any such changes. Information on 
changes will be available in the Offices of the Registrar, the Dean for 
Student Affairs, and the Vice President. It is especially important that 
each student note that it is his/her responsibility to keep himself/herself 
apprised of current graduation requirements for his/her particular degree 
program. 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE IS AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/ 
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION AND 
DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE ON THE BASIS OF SEX, RACE, 
AGE, CREED, OR NATIONAL ORIGIN IN EMPLOYMENT, 
ADMISSIONS, OR ACTIVITIES. THE COLLEGE DOES NOT 
DISCRIMINATE ON THE BASIS OF PHYSICAL HANDICAP. 



A Four-Year College in the 
University System of Georgia 



ARMSTRONG STATE 
COLLEGE 



SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING 

1979-80 



Accredited by 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 



Contents 

Page 
CALENDAR 7 

I. HISTORY, PURPOSE AND PROGRAMS 11 

History of the College 

Purpose 

Pre-Professional Programs 

Two- Year Degrees 

Four- Year Degrees 

Graduate Programs 

Internship Programs 

Evening Classes 

Senior Citizens 

Community Services/Continuing Education 

Office of Development 

Office of Computer Services 

Student Exchange Program with 

Savannah State College 
NROTC Program 
Library 

II. STUDENT SERVICES, ACTIVITIES 18 

Counseling 

Veterans Services 

Testing Services 

Orientation 

Placement 

Conduct 

Student Activities and Organizations 

Student Government 

Student Publications 

Health 

Dental Hygiene Services 

Alumni Office 

Housing 

Athletics 

Intramurals 

Cultural Opportunities 

III. FEES 23 

Application Fee 
Matriculation Fee 
Out-of-State Tuition 
Student Activity Fee 
Health/Service Fee 
Athletic Fee 
Applied Music Fee 



Late Registration Fee 
Graduation Fee 
Transcript Fee 
Summary of Fees 
Privilege Fees 
Refunds 
Short Courses 

IV. STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 26 

Student Financial Aid 
Application Information 
Categories of Aid 
Federal Assistance 
State Assistance 
Local Assistance 
Government Benefits 
General Information 

V. ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 34 

General Information 

Freshman Applicants 

Requirements and Categories of Admission 

Advanced Placement and Credit by Examination 

Requirements for Transfer Applicants 

Readmission of Former Students 

Transient Students 

Armstrong State College/High School 
Accelerated Program 

Early Admission and Joint Enrollment Programs 

Foreign Students 

Admission of Veterans 

Applicants Sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation 

Admission to: 

Associate in Science Degree Program in Nursing 
Bachelor of Science Degree Program in Nursing 
Associate in Science Degree Program in Dental Hygiene 

Registration 

Residency Requirements of the Board of Regents 

VI. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 50 

Academic Advisement 
Relating to Degree Requirements 
Course and Study Load 
Classification of Students 
Permission for Overload or Courses 

at Another College 
Reports and Grades 
Honors 
Attendance 
Satisfactory Progress 



Academic Probation and Dismissal 
Repeating Courses 
Dropping Courses 
Withdrawing from College 
Auditing 
Honor Code 

VII. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR . 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 62 

University System Core Curriculum 

Armstrong Core Curriculum 

Regents' Examination 

Exit Examination 

Physical Education Program 

Placement Tests in English and Mathematics 

State Requirements in History and Government 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and 

the Bachelor of Science Degrees 
Requirements for Associate Degrees 
Additional Requirements 
Course Offerings 

VIII. DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL STUDIES ,69 

IX. SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 71 

Associate in Arts Degree Program 

Department of Biology 

Department of Chemistry and Physics 

Department of Fine Arts 

Department of History and Political Science 

Department of Languages and Literature 

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science 

Department of Psychology 

X. SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 146 

General Information 

Degree Programs Offered 

Transfer Students — Savannah State College 

Program Transfer — Transition Period 

General Requirements — Teacher Education Programs 

Early Elementary, Middle School Education 

Secondary Education 

Department of Physical Education and Athletics 

XL SCHOOL OF HUMAN SERVICES. . 164 

Department of Nursing — Associate Degree 
Department of Nursing — Baccalaureate Degree 
Department of Criminal Justice 
Department of Dental Hygiene 
Medical Record Technology 
Respiratory Therapy 
Social Work and Sociology 
4 



XII. GOVERNING BOARD, ADMINISTRATION, 

FACULTY AND STAFF 196 

Board of Regents 

Staff of the Board of Regents 

Officers of Administration 

Armstrong College Commission 

Faculty 

Administrative Staff 

APPENDIX: POLICY, REGENTS' TESTING PROGRAM 207 

INDEX 209 



1979 



1980 



S M T WT F S 

JANUARY 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 91011 1213 
14151617181920 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 

FEBRUARY 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11 12 1314 151617 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 

MARCH 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11 12 1314 151617 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

APRIL 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 91011 12 1314 
15161718192021 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 

MAY 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 91011 12 

13141516171819 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 

JUNE 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13141516 

17181920 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



S M T WT F S 

JULY 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
8 91011 121314 

15 16 17 1819 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 

AUGUST 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 

12131415161718 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 

SEPTEMBER 1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
91011 12131415 

1617181920 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 

OCTOBER 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 91011 1213 

14151617181920 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11 121314151617 

1819 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 

DECEMBER 1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

91011 12131415 

1617181920 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



S M T W T F S 

JANUARY 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 910 11 12 

13 141516171819 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 

FEBRUARY 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
1011 1213 141516 
17181920 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 

MARCH 1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

910 11 12 131415 

16 17 1819 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

APRIL 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 91011 12 

13141516171819 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 

MAY 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 
11 121314151617 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

JUNE 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 91011 12 1314 

15161718192021 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 



S M T W T F S 

JULY 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 91011 12 
13141516171819 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 

AUGUST 1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 1213141516 
1718192021 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

SEPTEMBER 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 1011 1213 
141516171819 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 

OCTOBER 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 

12 131415161718 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

91011 12131415 

1617 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 

DECEMBER 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 91011 1213 

141516171819 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



Academic Calendar 



SEPTEMBER 



OCTOBER 



OCTOBER 
NOVEMBER 



DECEMBER 



1979-1980 
Fall Quarter, 1979 

5 Freshman and transfer students should file all 

papers in the application for admission by this date. 

8 Institutional Scholastic Aptitude Test (limited to 

Armstrong applicants). 
14 Mathematics Diagnostic Test and English Placement 
Test for placement in beginning English and 
Mathematics classes; Basic Skills Examination. 

17 First Faculty Meeting. 

18 Basic Skills Examination. 
20, 21 Registration. 

24 Classes begin. 

26 Last day to enroll in any class; last day to pay fees. 

20 Graduate Record Examination (refer to GRE 

information booklet for application deadline); History 
and Government Examinations of the College Level 
Examination Program (application deadline — 
September 27). 

22 English Placement Test; Mathematics Diagnostic 
Test. 

26 Mid-term; last day to withdraw from a class without 
penalty. 

30 Regents' Examination (application deadline — 

October 11). 
29- 
2 Advisement for the Winter Quarter. 

5-9 Pre-registration for the Winter Quarter. 
10 National Teacher Examinations (refer to NTE 

information booklet for application deadline). 
13 Undergraduate Assessment Program exit examina- 
tions of selected departments (application deadline 
— October 9). 
22-23 Thanksgiving Holidays (begin at 12:30 p.m. on 

November 21). 
26-30 Student Appraisal of Instruction. 

4 Last day of classes. 
5-7 Examinations. 

7 Christmas Vacation begins. 

8 Graduate Record Examinations (refer to GRE 
information booklet for application deadline). 



Winter Quarter, 1980 

DECEMBER 11 Institutional Scholastic Aptitude Test (limited to 

Armstrong applicants). 
14 Freshman and transfer students should file all 

papers in the application for admission by this date. 



JANUARY 



19 

2 
3 

7 
12 

19 



FEBRUARY 



11 

12 

16 

18-22 
26 



25-29 



Basic Skills Examination; Mathematics Diagnostic 
Test. 

Registration. 
Classes begin. 

Last day to enroll in any class; last day to pay fees. 
Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test (refer to DHAT 
information booket for application deadline). 
History and Government Examinations of the 
College Level Examination Program (application 
deadline — December 20). 

Mid-term; last day to withdraw from class without 
penalty. 

English Placement Test; Mathematics Diagnostic 
Test. 

Regents' Examination (application deadline — 
January 24). 

National Teacher Examinations (refer to NTE 
information booklet for application deadline). 
Advisement for the Spring Quarter. 
Undergraduate Assessment Program exit examina- 
tions of selected departments (application deadline 
— January 22). 
Pre-registration for the Spring Quarter. 



MARCH 



MARCH 



3-7 Student Appraisal of Instruction. 

12 Last day of classes. 

13-14, 17 Examinations. 

18-24 Spring Vacation. 

Spring Quarter, 1980 

8 Institutional Scholastic Aptitude Test (limited to 
Armstrong applicants). 

Freshman and transfer applicants should file all 
papers in the application for admission by this date, 
Basic Skills Examination; Mathematics Diagnostic 
Test. 

Registration. 
Classes begin. 
Last day to enroll in any class; last day to pay fees. 



APRIL 



14 

18 

25 
26 

28 

19 



History and Government Examinations of the 
College Level Examination Program (application 
deadline — March 27). 
22 Regents' Examination (application deadline — April 
3). 

25 English Placement Test; Mathematics Diagnostic 
Test. 

26 Graduate Record Examinations (refer to GRE 
information booklet for application deadline). 

29 Mid-term; last day to withdraw from class without 
penalty. 



MAY 



JUNE 



5-9 

13 



12-16 

26-30 

3 
4-6 

6 



Advisement for the Summer Quarter. 
Undergraduate Assessment Program exit examina- 
tions of selected departments (application deadline 
- April 8). 

Pre-registration for the Summer Quarter. 
Student Appraisal of Instruction. 

Last day of classes. 

Examinations. 

Graduation. 



MAY 
JUNE 



JULY 



Summer Quarter, 1980 

24 Institutional Scholastic Aptitude Test (limited to 
Armstrong applicants). 

5 Freshman and transfer applicants should fill all 

papers in the application for admission by this date; 
transient students (for Summer Quarter only) should 
file all application papers by this date. 

10 Basic Skills Examination; English Placement Test; 
Mathematics Diagnostic Test. 

14 Graduate Record Examinations (refer to GRE 
information booklet for application deadline). 

16 Registration. 

17 Classes begin. 

19 Last day to enroll in any class; last day to pay !• 

21 History and Government Examinations of the 
College Level Examination Program (application 
deadline — May 28). 

30 Basic Skills Examination; English Placement Test; 
Mathematics Diagnostic Test. 

4 Holiday. 
7-11 Advisement for the Fall Quarter. 

11 CHAOS Session for Fall Quarter applicants; 
Mathematics Diagnostic Test. 

12 Institutional Scholastic Aptitude Test (limited to 
Armstrong applicants). 

15 Regents' Examination (application deadline — Jul) 
2). 

16 Mid-term; last day to withdraw from class without 
penalty. 

17 Basic Skills P^xamination. 

14-18 Pre-registration for the Fall Quarter. 

18 CHAOS Session for Fall Quarter applicants; 
Mathematics Diagnostic Test. 

19 National Teacher Examinations (refer to XTK 
information booklet for application deadline). 

22 Undergraduate Assessment Program exit examina- 
tions of selected departments (application deadline 
- June 18). 

25 CHAOS Session for Fall Quarter applicants; 
Mathematics Diagnostic Test. 



AUGUST 1 CHAOS Session for Fall Quarter applicants. 

4-8 Student Appraisal of Instruction. 

14 Last day of classes. 

15, 18-19 Examinations. 

19 Graduation. 




10 



I. History, Purpose and 
Programs 

History of the College 

Armstrong State College was founded on May 27. 1935, as Armstrong 
Junior College, by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah to 
meet a pressing need for a college in the community. The college was 
housed in the Armstrong Building, a gift to the city from the family of 
George F. Armstrong, and over the years built or acquired five additional 
buildings in the Forsyth Park and Monterey Square areas. The college, as 
Armstrong College of Savannah, became a two-year unit in the University 
System of Georgia on January 1, 1959, under the control of the Regents of 
the University System. In 19()2, the Mills B. Lane Foundation purchased a 
new campus site of over 200 acres located on Abercorn Extension. The new 
campus, with eight new buildings, was occupied in December, 1965. 

In 1964, the regents conferred upon Armstrong the status of a four-year 
college, with the right to offer the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science, and Bachelor of Business Administration. President Henry L. 
Ashmore, who succeeded President Foreman M. Hawes on July 1. 1964, 
was charged with the responsibility of developing the institution from 
junior to senior status. A junior year was added to the college curriculum in 
1966-67, with the senior year added in 1967-68 and the first four-year 
degrees awarded at the spring, 1968 commencement. The college now 
offers more than twenty major programs leading to baccalaureate de- 
grees, and, in addition, the two-year associate degree in a number of 
academic areas. Effective in the 1971-72 academic year, the Board of 
Regents of the University System of Georgia authorized Armstrong State 
College and Savannah State College to offer joint programs leading to the 
M.B. A. and M.S. in Elementary Education degrees. Additional programs 
in Teacher Education at the secondary level were initiated Summer Quar- 
ter, 1972. 

As the result of approval in early 1979 by the Department of Health. 
Education, and Welfare of the Georgia Plan for Further Desegregation of 
Higher Education, all Business Administration programs were trans- 
ferred from Armstrong State College to Savannah State College in Sep- 
tember, 1979, and all Teacher Education programs were transferred from 
Savannah State to Armstrong State on that date. With this exchange <>\ 
programs, Armstrong offers the only degree programs in Teacher Educa- 
tion at the baccalaureate and graduate levels in the immediate geographi- 
cal area. 

The academic community includes approximately 3,000 students and 140 
full-time faculty members. Armstrong State College was fully accredited 
as a senior institution by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 
in December, 1968, with accreditation retroactive to. January 1. 1968, and 
was re-accredited in December, 1972. 



Purpose 

Armstrong State College is a multi-purpose institution offering degree 
programs in the liberal arts, sciences, and a number of specialized fields. 
As a service to the community, it also provides a continuing education 
program for those who have non-degree objectives. The College strives to 
maintain the flexibility and adaptability which activated its growth and 
change of status in less than thirty-five years from a small city-supported 
junior college to a senior college in the University System of Georgia. 
Therefore, the College defines its present purpose in the following terms: 

to provide modern facilities and a professional staff in an environment 
that promotes the free exchange of ideas; 

to bring each student to a better realization of his own intellectual, 
emotional, and spiritual potential by providing academic programs in the 
humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences; 

to develop the student's technical and analytical skills through programs 
leading to professional degrees in a number of areas, including Health 
Professions, Criminal Justice, and Teacher Education; 

to offer opportunities for continuing education through symposia, con- 
ferences, institutes, and courses unrelated to degree programs; 

to make available the full resources of the College through involvement 
in research projects, public service activities, and other programs spon- 
sored by the community. 

Pre-Professional Programs 

Armstrong State College offers courses appropriate for the first two 
years of baccalaureate programs such as engineering, forestry, industrial 
management, pharmacy, physical therapy, physics, etc., not offered 
among its degree programs; the pre-professional study appropriate for 
dentistry, law, medicine, veterinary medicine, and other professional 
fields. v 

Armstrong State College-Georgia Institute of 
Technology Dual-Degree Program 

Upon completion of the first three years of academic work at Arm- 
strong, the student may enroll for two subsequent years at Georgia Insti- 
tute of Technology. After completing the requirements of the two 
cooperating institutions, the student will be awarded a baccalaureate 
degree from Armstrong State College and a baccalaureate degree in one of 
a number of academic areas from Georgia Institute of Technology. For 
further information on this dual-degree program, the student should con- 
tact the Office of the Vice President. 



Two- Year Degrees 

The following two-year degrees arc offered as preparation for higher 
degrees in the liberal arts and professions or as terminal professional 

degrees. 

Associate in Arts. 

Associate in Science in Nursing. 

Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene. 

Associate in Science in Criminal Justice. 

Associate in Science in Medical Record Technology. 

Associate in Science in Respiratory Therapy. 

Four- Year Degrees 

Bachelor of Arts in the fields of history, English, music, political science. 
psychology, and social work. 

Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology, chemistry, mathematical 
sciences, and criminal justice. 

Bachelor of Science in Education with majors in Early Elementary 
Education, Middle School Education, and Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation. 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

Bachelor of Music Education. 

The College is authorized to offer Teacher Education programs, pre- 
paring students for certification by the Georgia State Department of 
Education, in the following areas: Art, Behavioral Science, Biology, 
Chemistry, Early Elementary, English, French, General Science. His- 
tory, Industrial Arts, Mathematics, Middle School, Music, Physics, Politi- 
cal Science, Social Studies, Spanish, Trade and Industrial Education. 
Information concerning the status of these programs is available in the 
Office of the Dean for the School of Education or the Office of the Director 
of Admissions. 



Graduate Programs 

Master of Education degree programs are offered in Early Elementary 
Education, Middle School Education, Special Education (Behavior Disor- 
ders) as well as in the secondary teaching fields of Biology, Chemistry, 
English, History, and Political Science. (English. History, and Political 
Science are available as options without teacher certification require- 
ments.) The Masters programs are designed to provide opportunities for 
further professional growth, for expanding professional and cultural back- 
grounds, and for extending knowledge and understanding in an area of 
specialty. 

For complete information about these programs, contact the Office of 
the Dean for Graduate and Extended Studies. 



Internship Programs 

Students at Armstrong State College may participate in two state-wide 
internship programs: the Georgia Intern Program and the State Legisla- 
tive Intern Program. These programs provide the student with opportuni- 
ties to observe first-hand and to participate in agency and legislative 
processes as he works under the direction of and is responsible to an 
agency or legislative supervisor. In addition to state-wide internship pro- 
grams, students may participate in local internship experiences. They may 
receive academic credit for these experiences. They must be enrolled full- 
time at the College and must be in good academic standing. For further 
details concerning the requirements for internship programs at the Col- 
lege, please consult the Head of the Department of History and Political 
Science. 



Evening Classes 

In addition to the full daytime schedule, Armstrong offers a schedule of 
classes in the evening. Students employed during the day should limit their 
enrollment to one or two courses each quarter. 

Senior Citizens 

Residents of Georgia, sixty-two years of age or older at the time of 
registration, may enroll in courses for credit or as auditors on a space 
available basis, with waiver of matriculation fees. They will be required, 
however, to pay for supplies, etc., that might be necessary for a given 
course. The individual must present a birth certificate or other comparable 
documentation of age to qualify for the waiver of fees and must meet all 
requirements for admission to the college. Further information on this 
program is available from the Office of Admissions. 

Community Services-Continuing Education 

Armstrong State College is committed to the concept that an academic 
institution should attempt to reach out and serve the community of which it 
is a part. This service includes the extension of the resources of the campus 
to individuals and groups that are not a part of the regular academic 
community and the use of the college's special competence to assist in the 
solution of community problems. 

The Community Services division, under the direction of the Dean for 
College and Community Services, is responsible for the coordination of all 
community services/continuing education activities. Since these activities 
are viewed as a college- wide function, responsibility for program develop- 
ment is shared with the various academic departments. The major commu- 
nity services/continuing education components of the college are: (1) the 
short course/conference program; (2) the off-campus credit class program; 
(3) the Neighborhood Continuing Education Program. 



Short Courses /Conference Progr (i m . This unit administers non-degree 
courses, conferences, and seminars designed to provide for the educational 
needs of area residents who do not wish to participate in the regular credit 
classes offered by the college. Many of these activities are related to 
professional development experiences. The Office of the Registrar main- 
tains permanent records of the individual's participation in those activities 
that meet certain criteria. The Coordinator of Short ( lourses/t Jonferences 
is pleased to arrange an activity of special interest and value to community 
groups and organizations. 

Off-Campus Credit Class Program. In order to provide education op- 
portunities for specific groups of area residents, the college makes availa- 
ble credit classes at off-campus locations convenient to the students in- 
volved. These classes are conducted in strict conformity with college 
standards and with policies of the Board of Regents of the University 
System of Georgia. The Dean for Graduate and Extended Studies wel- 
comes requests for the organization of these classes. 

Neighborhood Cont inning Education Program. This program is a coop- 
erative endeavor of Armstrong State College, Savannah State College, 
Georgia Southern College, and the University of Georgia. Located in the 
central city, this program provides continuing education activities for low 
income residents. Its major objective is to utilize the combined resour 
of the cooperating institutions to provide educational experiences suited to 
the needs of the citizens within the inner city area. 

Use of Facilities by Community Groups. As a tax supported unit of the 
University System of Georgia, the college makes available its facilities to 
certain community groups when such usage does not interfere with col- 
lege-sponsored activities and when such usage is for an activity of cultural. 
educational, or civic significance. College facilities will not be made availa- 
ble to (1) profit-seeking organizations; (2) community groups that are 
sponsoring events for the purpose of making a profit; (3) religious groups; 
(4) groups sponsoring activities that compete or conflict with college pro- 
grams. A schedule of usage fees is available in the Office of the Dean for 
College and Community Services. 

Proctoriyig Examinations. The Community Services division cooper- 
ates with the Georgia Center for Continuing Education (University of 
Georgia) through service as a center at which examinations are proctored 
for students enrolled in independent study (correspondence) courses. A 
booklet describing these courses is available upon request. Examinations 
from other colleges and examinations by professional societies can also be 
proctored. Examination proctoring is by prior arrangement only. Stu- 
dents using this service are encouraged to check with the diviion office 
prior to the date for the examination to make certain that the examination 
materials are on hand. 



Office of Development 

The purpose of the Office of Development is to promote funding for college 
programs from sources supplemental to state appropriations and student 



fees. To accomplish this purpose, the college participates in federal and 
other grant supported activities and seeks assistance from alumni and 
friends. From private sources, the College accepts memorial and other 
gifts for the athletic program, instructional equipment, library books, 
matching funds for grants, scholarships, and other restricted purposes. 
Unrestricted contributions are accepted to be used at the discretion of the 
President to meet special and unforeseen needs. Gifts of any size can be 
used to add to the library collection in the name of .an individual or an 
agency, although all gifts are acknowledged and published, where appro- 
priate and when requested, by the donor's name. Gifts for scholarships are 
generally received by the College in one of two ways: the donor specifies 
support or choice of specific students, with the College serving only as a 
distribution agent; or the donor specifies support of student scholarships 
generally or scholarships within a broad academic field, with the College 
identifying the gift by name, if appropriate, and distributing the funds 
according to standard policies and procedures. Gifts of this latter type are 
tax deductible. The Director of Development is pleased to provide further 
information to any prospective donor. 

Office of Computer Services 

This office coordinates the campus- wide system of computer services. 
The Director also provides technical assistance to the faculty and staff of 
the college in the development of computer programs and systems. 
Through participation in the University System Computer Network, in- 
formation processing devices located on campus are connected via a direct 
telephone line to the large computers located at Georgia State University 
and the University of Georgia. 

Student Exchange Program with 
Savannah State College 

A student enrolled at Savannah State College or at Armstrong State 
College as a full-time student has the privilege of taking one course with his 
Dean's approval at the other college without paying an additional fee. No 
restrictions are placed on the number of courses taken at the other college 
if the student is enrolled in the joint program in Social Work. In this 
program, however, the student must enroll in major area courses only to 
receive unrestricted enrollment privileges. The colleges operate a shuttle- 
bus service between the two campuses to facilitate movement of students 
who are taking courses on both campuses. A student may obtain in the 
Office of the Registrar the proper form for permission to register for 
courses at Savannah State College. 

NROTC Program 

Qualified male or female students at Armstrong State College may 
enroll in the Naval Reserve Officers Training program offered on the 



Savannah State College campus. Full tuition paid scholarship programs 
for students desiring to be either Navy or Marine Corps officers arc- 
available. Most majors are acceptable with entry level at either the incom- 
ing freshman or prospective junior level. For further information, consult 
the Registrar at Armstrong State College; the Commanding Officer, 
NROTC Unit, Savannah State College; or the Savannah State College 
Bulletin and General Catalog. 

Library 

The Lane Library, centrally located on campus, is a multi-resource and 
multi-service facility. The first floor houses a reference collection, all 
periodicals and micromaterials, government documents, maps, vertical 
files, folios, archieves, and a reading room. The technical services depart- 
ment, in which all orders are placed, cataloged, and processed, is also 
located on this floor. The department utilizes a C RT terminal and MODE M 
for all monograph cataloging as a member of the Southeastern Library 
Network. All audio-visuals, both software and hardware, the circulating 
collection, individualized study carrels, and typing facilities are located on 
the second floor. A television production studio and graphics laboratory 
are also located on this floor. This sophisticated complex allows faculty to 
augment their classroom lectures with in-house production of video pro- 
gramming and broadcasting. 

The library collection combines traditional media such as monographs, 
periodicals and micromaterials with more recent types of media such as 
audio and video tapes, recordings, filmstrips and motion pictures. An 
array of micromaterial readers and printers, video beam projectors, and 
audio hardware is available for constant use. Housed in the library are 
approximately 350,000 total resources, includig 115,000 books and bound 
periodicals; 10,000 documents and maps; 240,000 microforms; (>,(>00 re- 
cords, motion pictures, slides, and video tapes, and 1,110 newspapers and 
periodical subscriptions. 

The Lane Library's card catalog, a cooperative project of several Savarr-" 
nah area libraries, lists the location of most print and non-print materials in 
the following libraries; Armstrong State College, Savannah State College, 
Savannah Public Library, Georgia Historical Society, Memorial Medical 
Center, St. Joseph's Hospital, Georgia Regional Mental Health Clinic, 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Savannah District, and the Chatham 
County Department of Human Resources. 

The Lane Library faculty and staff welcomes suggestions for the im- 
provement of its collections and services. 



II. Student Services, 
Activities 

The Office of Student Affairs, administered by the Dean for Student 
Affairs, is responsible for all student services and activities. In addition to 
formal classroom instruction, the College recognizes the need for provid- 
ing programs and services which contribute to a well-rounded college 
experience. Such programs are administered by the Office of Student 
Affairs through the following individuals: Counselors, Director of Student 
Activities, Director of Student Financial Aid and Veterans Affairs, Finan- 
cial Aid/Veterans Advisor, and Campus Nurse. 

Counseling 

Counselors are available in the Counseling and Placement Office to 
assist students in making successful and realistic decisions and in choosing 
appropriate routes for attaining selected goals. The counseling process 
focuses on increasing the student's self-understanding and respect for his 
own ability to make decisions that will affect his life. All discussions are 
confidential. 

Counselors can assist students in clarifying educational and vocational 
objectives, in developing effective study skills and habits, and in dealing 
with problems of social and emotional significance. 

Veterans Services 

Armstrong State College maintains an Office of Veterans Affairs located 
in the Administration Building. The veterans' director is available to 
advise veterans concerning admissions procedures and services available 
to them as students. The office also employs a number of student veterans 
to assist in meeting the needs of veteran student body at Armstrong. 

Testing Services 

A variety of individual tests and inventories are available through, and 
often included in, counseling services. Such tests provide information to 
help students evaluate personal, educational, or vocational needs. Test 
results are confidential. 

The following testing programs are administered regularly by members 
of the counseling staff: ACT Proficiency Examination Program (PEP), 
College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Dental Admission Test 
(DAT), Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test, Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE), Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), National Teacher Ex- 
amination (NTE), Regents' Examination, and the Undergraduate Assess- 
ment Program (Exit Examinations). Information about the Allied Health 

18 



Professions Admission Test, the Graduate Management Admission Test, 
the Graduate School Foreign Language Test, the Miller Analogic- T< 
the Optometry College Admission Test, the Professional and Administra- 
tive Career Examination, the State Merit Examination, and the Veteri- 
nary Aptitude Test may be obtained from the Counseling and Placement 
Office. 

Orientation 

The decision to enter college for further education and knowledge Is an 
important point in an individual's process of self-development. The Sum- 
mer Orientation Program (CHAOS) at Armstrong State College is 
planned to aid the student in his transition to college by exposing him to t he 
dynamics of successful decision-making. Using techniques that encourage 
the realization of possible outcomes and consequences, the student will 
learn to explore his possibilities with more understanding and confidence. 

Freshmen participating in this program will be given information con- 
cerning student activities programs, visit campus facilities, and plan their 
class schedules with academic advisors. 

An abbreviated orientation program is scheduled for students new to 
the college prior to registration Winter, Spring, and Summer Quarters. 

Placement 

The Placement Counselor, located in the Counseling and Placement 
Office in the Administration Building, offers general assistance in the 
planning of career directions. The office operates a personal resume ser- 
vice for all regularly enrolled students of the college, receives listings of 
full-time career opportunities, and arranges on-campus recruiting with 
business, governmental and educational agencies. Students who wish to 
make use of the Placement Service are advised to contact the Placement 
Counselor three quarters prior to completion of studies. 

The Placement Office also provides a job listing and referral system for 
currently enrolled students who are seeking part-time, temporary, or 
vacation employment. 

Conduct 

Every student who enrolls in a course at Armstrong State College 
commits himself, by the act of enrolling, to full compliance with the rules 
and regulations of the Honor System and Code of Conduct. The Honor 
System is outlined under "Academic Regulations" in this Bulletin and the 
Code of Conduct is published in the Armstrong Student Handbook, Stu- 
dents Illustrated. 

Compliance with the regulations and policies of the faculty of Armstrong 
State College and the Regents of the University System of Georgia is 
assumed. To enroll is to agree to assume responsibility for adhering to 
policies and using established channels to promote change. Not to do so is 
sufficient basis for the college to terminate a student's enrollment. 



1Q 



Student Activities and Organizations 

In addition to an outstanding academic program, Armstrong State Col- 
lege offers a complete program of co-curricular student activities assigned 
to contribute to the development of the student and to assist him in 
becoming an active and productive member of the community in which he 
lives. 

Student organizations at Armstrong State College reflect the natural 
variety of interests found in a diversified student body. Individuals who 
seek a well-rounded education will avail themselves of the varied oppor- 
tunities afforded through the college program of student activities. 

A variety of clubs and organizations representing varied interests and 
activities are available to students at Armstrong State College. These 
include the following: 
Religious: 

Baptist Student Union 
Greeks: 

Panhellenic Council 

Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority 

Sigma Kappa Sorority 

Phi Mu Sorority 

Phi Kappa Theta Fraternity 

Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity 

Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity 

Sigma Nu Fraternity 
Professional: 

Student Nurses Association of Georgia 

Future Secretaries Association 

Student Association of Educators 

Junior American Dental Hygienists Association 

American Chemical Society 

Alpha Sigma Chi (Physical Education) 

Armstrong State College Student Data Processing 
Management Association 

Association for Computing Machinery 

Social Work Club 
Interest: 

Glee Club 

Band 

Chess Club 

Cheerleaders 

Masquers 

Buccaneers 

Black American Movement 

Senior Classical League 
Honorary: 

Phi Eta Sigma (Scholastic honorary for freshmen) 

Phi Alpha Theta (History) 

Pi Mu Epsilon (Mathematics) 

Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 



Student Government 

The Student Government Association is the official governing body of 
the students at Armstrong State College. It assists in formulating a 
program of student services and activities, and it strives to express the will 
of the majority of students and to provide experience in democratic living. 

All students are automatically members of the Student Government 
Association and are entitled to vote in SGA elections. Qualified students 
may seek positions of leadership in the Student Government Association 
by running for office during the winter quarter. 

Student Publications 

The two official student publications on campus are the Inkwell (the 
College newspaper) and the Geechee (the College yearbook). These publi- 
cations are produced by students under the supervision of approved col- 
lege advisors. Financed in part by the Student Activity Fund, the Inkwell 
and the Geechee provide opportunities for students in creative writing, 
reporting, photography, and design. 

Health 

Armstrong State College maintains a campus infirmary where a regis- 
tered nurse is on duty from 8:15 a.m. until 5 p.m. Students who become ill 
or who are involved in accidents while on campus should not hesitate to 
avail themselves of this service. 



Dental Hygiene Services 

The Dental Hygiene Clinic is available to Armstrong State College and 
Savannah State College students who wish to receive an oral prophylaxis 
and a flouride treatment. School identification cards will be requested by 
the Clinic receptionist. 



Alumni Office 

The primary purposes of the Alumni Office are to keep former students 
informed about the college and to help them keep in touch with each other. 
Any person who at any time was matriculated as a regular student is 
eligible for membership in the Alumni Association and, upon payment of 
his dues, will receive association periodicals, and may vote and hold office 
in the Association. The Alumni Office assists in arranging class reunions, 
board meetings, and other functions. For further information contact the 
Alumni Secretary. 



Housing 

There is no student housing on campus. Private apartments for male, 
female, and married students are located within walking distance of Arm- 
strong State College. For further information regarding housing, please 
contact the Office of Student Affairs. 



Athletics 

Armstrong State College is affiliated with the National Association of 
Intercollegiate Athletics, National Collegiate Athletic Association, South 
Atlantic Conference, Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women 
and Georgia Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women. The col- 
lege teams participate in intercollegiate competition in baseball, basket- 
ball, cross country track events, golf, Softball and tennis. 

Intramurals 

The Student Intramural Council and Intramural Department provide a 
diversified program available to all students and faculty, including or- 
ganized competitive sports, recreational activities, and clubs. Any student 
interested in participating in these activities should contact the Director of 
Intramurals. 



Cultural Opportunities 

Armstrong State College provides a variety of cultural opportunities for 
its students. Lectures by eminent scholars in the various academic fields 
and musical concerts by outstanding artists are an integral part of the 
program in general education. Student dramatic productions under profes- 
sional direction and the student choral and instrumental groups have 
created distinguished traditions. 




III. Fees 

Application Fee 



The Application Fee of $10.00 is paid by each student at the time of initial 
application for admission to Armstrong State College. The acceptance of 
the Application Fee does not constitute acceptance of the student. This fee 
is not refundable. 

In addition to the application fee mentioned above, a deposit of $50.00 is 
required of all dental hygiene applicants who are accepted for admission. 
This deposit is applied against registration fees during the first quarter of 
attendance. If the student does not enroll, the deposit is not refundable. 

Matriculation Fee 

The Matriculation Fee for students registering on campus for the normal 
course load of fifteen hours is $153.00. Students carrying less than 12 credit 
hours on campus in a quarter will pay at the rate of $13.00 per quarter hour 
in Matriculation Fees. Students who register for off-campus credit hours 
will pay at the rate of $16.00 per credit hour. Matriculation fees are waived 
for residents of Georgia upon presentation of written documentation that 
they are 62 years of age or older. 

Out-of-State Tuition 

Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $262.00 per quarter in 
addition to all regular fees. Students carrying less than 12 credit hours in a 
quarter who are not legal residents of the State of Georgia will pay at the 
rate of $22.00 per quarter hour Out-of-State Fee in addition to all regular 
fees. Students who register for off-campus credit courses will pay at the 
rate of $22.00 per quarter hour Out-of-State Fee in addition to all regular 
fees. Out-of-State tuition fees are waived for active duty military person- 
nel and their dependents stationed in Georgia and on active duty, except 
military personnel assigned to this institution for educational purposes. 



Student Activity and HealtlVService Fees 

There will be a Student Activity Fee ($15.00) and a Health/Service Fee 
($2.50) for all student enrolled for six or more hours in the undergraduate 
program. Students who are enrolled for five hours or less may choose 
whether or not to pay the Student Activity Fee. Students who choose not 
to do so will be accorded limited student activity privileges. 



Athletic Fee 

There will be an Athletic Fee of $10.00 per quarter for all students 
enrolled in the undergraduate program. 



Applied Music Fees 

Applied music courses consist of one or two twenty-five minute private 
lessons per week. A special fee of $31.00 for one twenty-five minute lesson 
or $62.00 for two lessons is charged quarterly to students not admitted to a 
music degree program and to music majors not enrolled for ten or more 
quarter hours of credit. This fee is refundable only when the student has 
not met his first lesson. 



Late Registration Fee 

A late registration fee of $4.00 will be charged to students registering on 
the date listed in the catalog as the date on which classes begin. A fee of 
$5.00 will be charged for registrations completed on the date listed in the 
catalog as the "last day to enroll in any class; last day to pay fees." This fee 
is not refundable. 



Graduation Fee 

A Graduation Fee of $20.00 will be collected from each candidate for 
graduation. If the candidate is receiving a second degree at the same 
graduation ceremonies, an additional fee of $5.00 will be collected. The fee 
will be $20.00 for a second degree awarded at a subsequent graduation 
ceremony. 



Transcript Fee 

Each student is entitled to one official transcript of his college work. The 
charge for additional copies is $1.00 each, 

Summary of Fees 

Matriculation, per quarter $153.00 

Student Activity, per quarter 15.00 

Health/Service, per quarter 2.50 

Athletic, per quarter 10.00 

TOTAL FOR GEORGIA RESIDENTS $180.50 

Out-of-State Tuition, per quarter $262.00 

TOTAL FOR NON-RESIDENTS $442.50 

Matriculation Part-Time Students, per quarter hour .$13.00 

Non-Resident Tuition, Part-Time Students, per 
quarter hour (in addition to Matriculation Fee) $22.00 

Privilege Fees 

Application Fee $10.00 

Late Registration-Maximum 5.00 



Graduation Fee 20.00 

Transcript, first one free, each additional LOO 

Applied Music Fee 31.00/62.00 

Dental Hygiene Deposit 50.00 

Refunds 

Refunds of fees will be made only upon written application for with- 
drawal from school. No refunds will ho made to students dropping a 
course. Privilege fees are not refundable. Students who formally withdraw 
on the date of scheduled registration or during one week following Un- 
scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of mi'; of the i\-c> paid 
for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw during the period be- 
tween one and two weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled 
to a refund of 60% of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally 
withdraw between two and three weeks after the scheduled registration 
date are entitled to a refund of 4()7 f of the fees paid for that quarter. 
Students who formally withdraw during the period between three and four 
weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 203 
of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who withdraw after a period of 
four w r eeks has elapsed from the scheduled registration date will be en- 
titled to no refund of any part of the fees paid that quarter. 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any financial obligation to the 
college will have grade reports and transcripts of records encumbered. 
Grade reports and transcripts will not be released, nor will the student be 
allowed to re-register at the college until all financial obligations are met. 

Fees for each quarter are to be paid in full at the time of registration. 

If a check is not paid on presentation to the bank on which it is drawn, t he 
student's registration will be cancelled and the student may re register 
only on payment of $5.00 service charge. 

Short Courses 

Fees are announced for each quarter when the course is scheduled by the 
College. 

Students who formally withdraw from a short course or conference 
before its first meeting will receive a full refund of fees paid provided the 
withdrawal is in writing and is received by the office of Community 
Services prior to the first class meeting of the course or conference. No 
refund wil be made for withdrawals received after the first class meeting. 
Fees paid for courses or conferences cancelled by the College will be 
refunded at 100%. 



FEES AND CHARGES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AT THE END 

OF ANY QUARTER. 



IV. Student Financial 

Aid 

Armstrong State College subscribes to the principle that the primary 
purpose of a student financial aid program is to provide financial assistance 
to students who, without such assistance, would be unable to attend 
college. The primary responsibility for financing a college education is the 
inherent obligation of the student and/or family. Financial assistance from 
Armstrong State College should be viewed as supplementary to the efforts 
of the student and/or family. An assessment of parental ability to contrib- 
ute toward the student's educational expenses is made by the College 
Scholarship Service so that neither the parent, the student, nor Arm- 
strong State College be required to bear an undue share of the financial 
responsibility. 

Application Information 

An applicant for student financial aid at Armstrong must: 

1. be enrolled or accepted for enrollment at the College; 

2. obtain and complete and submit a Financial Aid Form (FAF) to the 
College Scholarship Service prior to June 30 for the coming academic 
year. 

3. submit a Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) Eligibility 
Report (SER) to the Office of Student Financial Aid by June 30 
preceding the next academic year. 

4. complete and submit the Request for Student Financial Aid Form. 
It may be necessary to complete additional forms depending on a 

student's year in school, major course of study, and/or eligibility for a 
particular program. Applications for financial assistance must be repeated 
annually. Most student financial aid awards are for the entire academic 
year, with payments made to the student in equal quarterly installments. 
A student may, however, apply and be considered for financial assistance 
during the academic year, if funds are available. 

All student financial aid awards are contingent upon the availablity of 
funds and the recipient's maintaining satisfactory progress toward a de- 
gree as defined in this Bulletin. 

The minimum number of quarter hours for which a student financial aid 
recipient may enroll per quarter varies from program to program. Most 
require at least 12 hours per quarter (full-time status); some require only 
10 hours per quarter. All programs require that the student be enrolled at 
least half-time taking 6 or more quarter hours. 

Students applying for financial aid, whether eligible or not, who do not 
meet or adhere to the above requirements will not be considered for 
financial aid. It is the responsibility of the parents and/or student to 
determine that all pertinent information and data have been obtained and 



are located in the Office of Student Financial Aid to assure a complete and 
accurate awarding of financial assistance. 

When the student has received acknowledgement from the College 
Scholarship Service that the Financial Aid Form (FAR) has been sent to 
the College and the student has delivered the Basic Grant Eligibility 
Report (SER) and the request for Financial Aid Form to the office of 
Student Financial Aid, the student and/or parents should telephone the 
office for an appointment with a financial aid advisor. The advisor will 
discuss the student's eligibility and, if applicable, the tenative award 
package. When the student has been determined eligible for financial aid, 
an award letter will be sent to the student indicating the type of award(s) 
and the amount to be received. 

NO AWARD WILL BE MADE UNLESS THE OFFICE OF STU- 
DENT FINANCIAL AID HAS BOTH THE BASIC GRANT ELIGIBIL- 
ITY REPORT, THE REQUEST FOR FINANCIAL All > FORM. AM) 
THE FINANCIAL AID FORM (FAF). 

Categories of Aid 

The College provides necessary financial assistance through 
grants/scholarships, work, and/or loans. Grants and scholarships art- 
awards that require neither service nor cash repayments, opportunities 
for part-time employment are provided for eligible students, usually on- 
campus, who are paid federal minimum wages on an hourly basis. Loans 
require cash repayment, service repayment, or a combination of both. 
These funds are made available through the federal government, state 
government, and local sources. 

Federal Assistance 

The Basic Educational Opportunity Grant Program is designed to 
provide financial assistance to those who need it to attend post-high school 
educational institutions. The BEOG is a grant and, unlike a loan, does not 
have to be repaid. Award amounts vary, depending upon the student's 
eligibility. 

The Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program is availa- 
ble to eligible students who establish exceptional financial need as deter- 
mined by the College Scholarship Service. The minimum award Is $200.00 
per academic year. The maximum may not exceed one-half of the student's 
established need, nor can it be more than one-half of the financial assis- 
tance supplied through the College. 

Currently, the College Work-Study Program allows an eligible student 
to work each class day during the quarter. Satisfactory work performance 
is mandatory. The student must also maintain satisfactory academic 
progress. A student on academic suspension, even though readmitted on 
appeal, will not be allowed to participate in the Work-Study Program. 

A National Direct Student Loan maybe awarded to an eligible student 
who has established a need through the College Scholarship Service. 

on 



Interest will be computed at the rate of three percent per annum simple 
interest on the unpaid principal balance. Interest is not charged and 
repayment is not required until nine months after the borrower ceases to 
be a student. All students using NDSL funds are required to complete an 
exit interview before leaving the college. 

A sample repayment schedule of a $1,000 NDSL loan at 3% would be: 

Payment Principal Principal Total 

Number Balance Interest Payment Payment 

1 $1,000.00 $ 2.50 : 

2 970.00 2.43 

3 940.00 2.35 

4 910.00 2.28 

5 880.00 2.20 

6 850.00 2.13 

34 10.00 .03 10.00 10.03 



30.00 


$ 32.50 


30.00 


32.43 


30.00 


32.35 


30.00 


32.28 


30.00 


32.20 


30.00 


32.13 



Totals $43.10 $1,000.00 $1,043.01 

Federal Nursing Student Loans and/or Scholarships are available to 
students who have: (1) established a financial need through the College 
Scholarship Service, (2) been accepted for enrollment by Armstrong State 
College, and (3) been admitted to the Nursing Program by the Depart- 
ment of Nursing. 

Law Enforcement Educational Program Grants are available to in- 
service personnel. Awards are made on a priority basis and require the 
completion of applications applicable to the program. In-service personnel 
need not complete the Basic Grant or F AF if attending college on a part- 
time basis. 



State Assistance 

Georgia Higher Education Assistance Corporation. Under this pro- 
gram, guaranteed loans are provided by private lending institutions to 
residents of Georgia. The loans accrue interest at the rate of 7 percent 
simple interest. Loans are made by lending institutions that have signed a 
contract with and have the guarantee of GHEAC. The process involves 
application for the loan by the student and parents, certification by the 
educational institution, and final approval by GHEAC. Students who are 
unable to secure funds locally may apply for a State Direct Loan. In this 
instance, the State of Georgia provides the funds and GHEAC guarantees 
the loan. Students enrolled in certain health career fields may elect to 
cancel all or a portion of their state direct loans by practicing in their fields. 
Applications and additional information may be obtained from the Office of 
Student Financial Aid. Students who receive GHEAC loans are usually 
required to be enrolled as full-time students (12 hours). Exceptions are 
made only to health career loans, in which case the student must notify the 
Office of Student Financial Aid in advance for approval of hours to be 
taken. 



Georgia Incentive Scholarships are awarded to residents who fcx 

post-high school education after 1 April. L974, and whose eligibility has 
been determined by the College Scholarship Service financial analysis. All 
veterans who were resident.- of Georgia at the time of their entry into 
military service may apply. Students must also request submission of a 
copy of the FAFto the State Scholarship Commission. All students apply- 
ing for Georgia Incentive Scholarships are required to apply for Basic 
Grant (BEOG). 

The Board of Regents* Fund sponsors a program under which Georgia 
residents may qualify for financial assistance at units of the University 
System. Applicants must be in the uper 259? of their class and have 
established a financial ncvd through the College Scholarship Service. 
Recipients must agree to work in the state, at an occupation forwhich they 
are qualified educationally, one year for each $1,000 received. If unable to 
meet this obligation, the student is expected to repay the full amount with 
interest at the rate of 3 percent simple interest. 

Students may be recommended for employment on the Institutional 
Student Assistants Program. Some department.- and offices of the col.. 
have funds available to hire student workers. Initial contact.- should be 
made by the student with the appropriate department head. 

Local Assistance 

Institutional Short-Term Loans are available to student.- for a max- 
imum of sixty days. Interest shall accrue at the rate of 3$ per annum. 
There are four short-term loans accounts: General, Nursing, Exchangette, 
and Kiwanis. Because of limited availability, short-term loans are usually 
made available to students for payment of tuition and fees at the College. 
Other requirements concerning short-term loans are available in the( office 
of Student Financial Aid. Funds for the General Short-Term Loan Fund 
have been provided by: 

John Bravo Memorial Sigma Kappa Sorority 

Rensing Loan Special Loans 

Rho Beta Chapter of Stephen Davis Memorial 

Alpha Phi Omega Union Camp Corporation 

Dental Hygiene students may apply for scholarship and/or loan funds 
from the Paderewski Memorial Fund. Interested students should contact 
eitherthe Head of the Dental Hygiene Department or the Office of Student 
Financial Aid. 

Armstrong State College accepts Scholarship applications throughout 
the year. Most awards are made annually during the summer. Scholar- 
ships are awarded when: 

1. an agency notifies the College of its intention to award a scholarship 
to a specified student, or 

-. an agency informs the College that it will award scholarships 
specific number of student.- selected by the Student Scholarship 
Committee. 






Applicants for scholarships awarded by the college must: 

1. complete the initial application process for financial aid; 

2. complete a separate scholarship application which may be obtained 
from the Office of Student Financial Aid; 

3. have, as an entering freshman, a minimum combined verbal and 
mathematical SAT score of 1,000; 

4. have, as a returning or transfer student, a minimum overall grade- 
point average of 3.0. 

Individuals who are applicants for scholarships to be awarded by the 
Student Scholarship Committee will be interviewed by that Committee at 
a designated time. Award notification will be given to those students 
selected at the end of the selection process. 

Government Benefits 

Social Security Administration. Social Security provides monthly 
benefits to children when a parent (a) dies, (b) starts receiving Social 
Security retirement, or (c) starts receiving disability benefits. Payments 
can be made until age 22, provided the child is a full-time student in an 
educational institution. Benefits can continue until the end of the quarter 
of attainment of age 22, if requirements for a bachelor's degree are not 
complete. Once Social Security benefits begin, it is the individual's respon- 
sibility to notify the Social Security office if he transfers to another school, 
if he withdraws from school, or if he reduces his hours below full-time 
attendance. The individual must also notify the Social Security Adminis- 
tration if he marries, if he is adopted, or if he earns more than $2,520 a 
year. Students who want to file applications, report changes, or receive 
more information should contact their Social Security Office. 

Vocational Rehabilitation. The Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Pro- 
gram provides financial assistance for the applicant who possesses an 
impairment which would prove to be a vocational handicap. The Office of 
Vocational Rehabilitation may pay the cost of tuition, books, and fees. 
Students who think that they may qualify under this program should 
contact one of the area Vocational Rehabilitation Centers located through- 
out the state. The Savannah Center is located at 420 Mall Boulevard. 
Applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or other community 
agencies must apply at least six (6) weeks before the beginning of any 
quarter to insure proper processing of applications. 

Veterans, Disability, and War Orphans Assistance. Veterans who 
served on active duty for other than training purposes for more than 180 
days, any part of which occurred after June 1, 1966, are eligible for 
financial assistance to attend college through the G. I. Bill. Generally, sons 
and daughters of veterans whose death or total disablement was a result of 
service in the armed forces are eligible for financial benefits under the 
veterans program for educational assistance. 

How to Apply. A prospective student must first make application to the 
College and gain approval for admission from the Office of the 
Registrar/Director of Admissions. A veteran cannot receive benefits 



QA 



while matriculating under a Continuing Education admission status. Once 

accepted, the veteran should go to the local office of the Georgia Depart- 
ment of Veterans Service located at 410 .Mall Boulevard, Savannah, I reor- 
gia, and have an application for VA educational benefits completed. The 
veteran must carry a copy of his Record of Discharge, DI) Form 214, and 
supporting documentation of dependency status (marriage certificate; di- 
vorce decree, if previously married; and birth certificates of all dependent 
children). The veteran will then be given the forms to present to the < Office 
of Veterans Affairs at Armstrong State College. Student.- transferring 
from other educational institutions, OJT programs, or correspondence 
schools must complete a "Request for Change of Place of Training/* lhange 
of Program" VA Form 1995 with the Armstrong office of Veterans Af 
fairs. At the time of initial matriculation each student/veteran must de- 
clare a specific program of study (major) and must follow the curriculum 
for this major without exception or benefits may be interrupted. Any 
student receiving government benefits from the Veterans Administration 
must check with the Armstrong State College Office of Veterans Affairs at 
the beginning of each quarter and file a form declaring the specific com 
and number of credit hours which he is attempting. Each student/veteran 
IS reminded that he must report any changes in his attendance. :. 
dropping, adding or withdrawal from school to the Armstrong offi< . 
Veterans Affairs immediately following such action. Veterans entering 
school under the G.I. Bill should have sufficient funds to finance them- 
selves until payments from the VA begin (approximately six weeks after 
application). 

General Information Relating to Student Financial 

Aid 

Distribution of Financial Aid. Financial assistance is distributed both 
directly and indirectly to eligible students from the federal, state, and local 
government and from private donors through the Office of Student Finan- 
cial Aid. Assistance is provided directly when the name of the recipient and 
the amount of assistance to be given are determined prior to the receipt of 
the funds by the college. Assistance is provided indirectly when fund.- are 
given to the college for general distribution to students who are deter- 
mined to be eligible for receipt of these funds. In both cases, it is the 
responsibility of the Office of Student Financial Aid to assure that the 
recipient has met all requirements and regulation.- concerning the receipt 
of such funds. Students who are found to be in violation of requirements 
and regulations concerning the receipt of financial assistance may jeopar- 
dize their continued eligibility for participation in the financial aid pro- 
gram. It is the student's responsibility to be knowledgeable about all 
requirements governing the receipt of funds from each program from 
which the student receives financial assistant 

Student Cost. Student financial aid is awarded to eligible students on the 
basis of need in nearly all cases except scholarships which have fcx 
provided by donors for the purpose of recognizing academic promise or 

ai 



achievement. The determination of need is provided for Armstrong State 
College students through the use of the Financial Aid Form (FAF) and the 
College Scholarship Service which processes tfyis form. The process in- 
volves an analysis of the data provided by the student's family or, if 
independent, by the student. This analysis is sent to the Office of Student 
Financial Aid where it is compared with the cost of education for the 
appropriate classification of student. If the analysis shows that the family 
contribution or self contribution is less than the cost of education, financial 
need has been established. The Office of Student Financial Aid has the 
legal right to challenge information provided on the Financial Aid Form if, 
in the opinion of the financial aid officer, that information appears to be 
inaccurate, incorrect, or misleading. Information relating to a student's 
eligibility is available to that student when he/she has completed all the 
necessary requirements for processing his/her financial aid application at 
the college. 
Student Classification. There are two basic student classifications: 

(1) dependent student who is a commuter (living with parents or guardian) 
or resident (not living with parents or guardian but either receiving 
financial support from them or claimed by them as a tax deduction); 

(2) independent student who is single (and total self-supporting) or mar- 
ried (or who is a single parent with one or more children). Each classifica- 
tion constitutes a cost of education group from which eligibility for financial 
aid is derived. An example of the cost of education for a dependent 
commuter student for one year would be: 

Tuition and fees $535 

Books and supplies 215 

Room and board 725 

Transportation 360 

Personal expenses 610 

TOTAL '. $2,445 

The cost of tuition and all pertinent fees and the refund policy of the 
College are outlined in the "Fees" section of this Bulletin. 

Availaility of Funds. In general, students who enter the College at the 
beginning of the fall quarter have a greater opportunity to receive financial 
assistance than those who enter later in the academic year. The awards 
processing time usually runs from June 1 to August 31. It is during this 
period that the Office of Student Financial Aid distributes its yearly 
allocation of funds to students who have completed the process cycle. In 
the event that there is a shortage of funds, students who are eligible for 
financial aid but whose applications were late will be placed on a waiting 
list until such time as funds becomes available. 

Rights and Responsibilities. Every eligible student has a right to re- 
ceive financial assistance provided that (1) funds are available at the 
college for award to the student; (2) the student meets the requirements 
pertinent to the program(s) from which assistance is sought; (3) the stu- 
dent has been admitted to the college or, in the case of an enrolled student, 
meets the standards of satisfactory academic progress as outlined in the 
"Academic Regulations" section of this Bulletin. In addition, it is the 

29 



student's responsibility to adhere to all regulations and requirements 

heretofore mentioned and to notify the Office of Student Financial Aid of 
any change in status which would have any effect on the legitimacy of 
financial assistance being received. 

Student Retention. Information regarding student retention (i.e., en- 
rollment patterns at the college) may be obtained upon request from the 
Office of the Registrar. Copies of this information are available to the 
student at a cost of $1.00 per copy. Information regarding specific dec 
programs is available in this Bulletin and from the Head of the Depart- 
ment in which a specific academic program is offered. 

Satisfactory Progress. See statement of definition in "Academic Regula- 
tions" section of this Bulletin. 




V. Admission to the 
College 

General Information 

Application forms for admission to Armstrong State College are at- 
tached to this Bulletin and provided by the Admissions Office upon re- 
quest. An application cannot be considered until all required forms are 
properly executed and returned to the Admissions Office. 

The applicant must be at least sixteen years old on or before registration 
date and must give evidence of good moral character, promise of growth 
and development, seriousness of purpose, and a sense of social responsibil- 
ity. Armstrong State College reserves the right to examine and appraise 
the character, the personality, and the physical fitness of the applicant by 
the use of achievement and aptitude tests and to require additional bio- 
graphical data and an interview before the applicant is accepted or re- 
jected. If an interview is required, the applicant will be notified. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to refuse to accept any or all 
of the credits from any high school or other institution, notwithstanding its 
accredited status, when the College determines through investigation or 
otherwise that the quality of instruction at such high school or other 
institution is for any reason deficient or unsatisfactory. The judgment of 
the College on this question shall be final. 

On the basis of achievement as reflected by high school or college grades 
and academic potential as shown by scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test, 
an evaluation of each applicant's readiness to undertake college work will 
be made. The Admissions Officer may refer any application to the Admis- 
sions Committee of the College for study and advice. 

The decision as to whether an applicant shall be accepted or rejected 
shall be made by the Admissions Officer in accordance with admission 
policies and subject to the applicant's right of appeal as provided in the 
policies of the Board of Regents of the University System. The Admissions 
Officer shall, as promptly as practicable, inform the applicant of the action 
taken upon his application. 

The College reserves the right to terminate acceptance of applications 
when enrollment capacity is reached. The College further reserves the 
right to reject an applicant who is not a resident of the State of Georgia. 

All students enrolled at Armstrong State College are required to affirm 
that they will abide by the provisions of the Honor Code. For a detailed 
explanation of the Honor System see the "Regulations" section of this 
Bulletin. 



Information Required for Freshman Applicants 

All freshman applicants must submit the following: 

1. a. Certificate of graduation from an accredited high school. A tran- 



script of the applicant's high school record must be submitted by the 
high school directly to the College. 

OR 
b. Evidence of successful completion of the General Education De- 
velopment Test (GED), with no scores less than 45. A BCOre report 
form must be submitted directly to the college from the GED testing 
center where the student took the test or by DANTKS, 2'MX South 
Park Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53713 (if the student took the test 
through the United States Armed Forces Institute while in military 
service). 
2. Satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Specific scores required are listed 
under the categories of admission below. Official results of the SAT 
must be filed with the Admissions Office by the final date for the 
submission of an application for the quarter in which a student wishes 
to enroll. The Scholastic Aptitude Test is given in all states and many 
foreign countries at least six times annually. Students wishing to 
make application to take the test may secure application forms from 
their secondary school principal or counselor or from the College 
Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 
08540, or Box 1025, Berkeley, California 94701. 

Admission Requirements and Categories of 
Admission 

The applicant who has fulfilled the general admission requirements 
listed above w T ill be granted admission to the College if he/she meets at 
least one of the following specific requirements: 

a high school grade-point average of 1.8 

or 

a score of not less than 250 on the verbal section of the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test 

or 

a score of not less than 280 on the mathematics section of the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test. 

Regular Admission 

The applicant who meetsa// three of the following requirements will be 

granted regular admission to the College: 

a total score on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of at least 760 (combined 
verbal and mathematics section) 

and 
a score of not less than 330 on the verbal section of the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test 

and 
a score of not less than 330 on the mathematics section of the Scholastic- 
Aptitude Test. 






Conditional Admission 

The applicant who qualifies for admission to the College but who does 
not qualify for regular admission will be granted conditional admission. 
All conditionally admitted students must take the Basic Skills Examina- 
tion. This examination should be taken before the student's first registra- 
tion at the College. Test dates for the Basic Skills Examination appear in 
the Academic Calendar in this Bulletin. If a conditionally admitted student 
registers before taking the Basic Skills Examination, his/her choice of 
courses will be limited to English 98 and Reading 98 (if the student's SAT 
verbal score is below 330), Mathematics 98 (if the student's SAT mathe- 
matics score is below 330), Study Techniques 99, and Core physical educa- 
tion course. / 

The student who presents an SAT verbal score of 330 or higher and an 
SAT mathematics score of 330 or higher but whose combined SAT score is 
less than 750 must take the Basic Skills Examination for advisement 
purposes. When the examination has been taken, the student will be 
granted regular admission. 

The student who presents an SAT verbal score of less than 330 and/or an 
SAT mathematics score of less than 330 will be granted regular admission 
if he/she passes all parts of the Basic Skills Examination. If he/she does 
not pass all parts of the examination, the student will remain conditionally 
admitted and will be required to enroll in appropriate courses in the 
Department of Special Studies until such time as his/her identified aca- 
demic deficiencies are removed. Upon successful completion of the Special 
Studies courses required, the student will be granted regular admission. 

A student in the Special Studies Program must have his/her schedule of 
classes approved by the Head of the Department of Special Studies each 
time the student registers or preregisters. The Head of the Department 
may refuse to allow a student in the Special Studies Program to enroll in 
any course for which the student lacks a prerequisite or for which the 
student's academic preparation appears inadequate. 

A student in the Special Studies Program will not be allowed to continue 
as a student at the College if the student receives three grades other than P 
for a course required of him in the Special studies Program. Grades other 
than P include U, I, W, WU, and WF. 

A student will exit the Special Studies Program and be granted regular 
admission status upon satisfying the requirements stated in the policies of 
the Special Studies Program. Copies of these policies may be obtained 
from the Special Studies departmental office. 

Advanced Placement and Credit by Examination 

Armstrong State College gives advanced placement, or in some cases 
college credit, for college level high school courses, on the basis of the 
student's grade on the College Board Advanced Placement Examination 
or the Admissions Testing Program achievement tests and approval by the 
appropriate department head at Armstrong State College. 



QC 



College credit may be granted for satisfactory scores on selected tests of 
the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), for satisfactory comple- 
tion of appropriate courses and tests offered through the United States 
Armed Forces Institute (USAFI), and for military service schools and 
experience as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Ser- 
vice Experiences of the American Council oil Education. Such credits may 
not exceed more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a degree. 

Specifically, the student with a strong academic background may, 
through certain examinations, demonstrate competence in: Art ^<><»: 
Biology 101, 102; English 111; Foreign Language 101, 102, 108; History 
114, 115, 251,252; Mathematics 101, 103, 104, 201, 220; Music 200; Natural 
Science without Laboratory; Nursing 101; Political Science 113; Sociology 
201. For information concerning the examinations which apply to the 
specific areas, please make inquiry to the Office of Admissions, the Office 
of the Registrar, the Office of Counseling and Placement, or the Head of 
the appropriate Academic Department. 

It is possible for a student, through a combination of the advanced 
placement and credit by examination programs, to begin his formal in- 
structional program at Armstrong State College as a sophomore. 

Requirements for Transfer Applicants 

1. Transfer applicants will follow the same procedures as freshman appli- 
cants, except that transfer applicants who will have achieved sopho- 
more standing at the time of their entrance will not be required to 
submit their high school records. Such records may be required by the 
Admissions Office, but normally the transcripts of previous college 
records will suffice in place of the high school record. A transfer appli- 
cant must ask the Registrar of each college he has previously attended 
to mail an official transcript of his record to the Admissions Office at 
Armstrong State College, regardless of the transferability of the 
credits. 

2. Transfer applicants who will enter with less than 36 quarter hours 
completed must meet entrance requirements of both freshman and 
transfer applicants and will be required to submit their high school 
records as well as transcripts of college records. 

3. A transfer applicant will not be eligible for admission to Armstrong 
State College unless he is eligible to return to the last college attended 
on the date he expects to enter Armstrong. A student who is on 
suspension from another college because of poor scholarship or for 
disciplinary reasons will not be eligible for admission. 

4. A transfer applicant will be considered for admission to Armstrong 
State College, if, on all work attempted at other institutions, his 
academic performance as shown by his grade-point average is equiva- 
lent to the minimum standard required by Armstrong State College 
students of comparable standing. (See chart under Academic Probation 
and Dismissal Policy in the "Academic Regulations" section of this 
Bulletin.) 



5. Credit will be given for transfer work in which the student received a 
grade of "C" or above. Credit will also be given for transfer work in 
which the student received grades of "D", with the limitation that such 
credit will not exceed twenty-five (25) percent of the total amount of 
credit accepted with grades of "C" or above. College credit will not be 
allowed for such courses as remedial English or remedial mathematics 
or courses basically of secondary school level. 

6. Credits earned at an institution which is not a member of the appropri- 
ate regional accrediting agency can be accepted on a provisional basis 
only. A student transferring from an institution which is not a member 
of a regional accrediting agency must achieve a "C" average on his first 
fifteen quarter hours of work at Armstrong in order to be eligible to 
continue. In certain areas he may be required to validate credits by 
examination. In computing cumulative grade averages, only the work 
attempted at Armstrong will be considered. 

7. The amount of credit that Armstrong will allow for work done in 
another institution within a given period of time may not exceed the 
normal amount of credit that could have been earned at Armstrong 
during that time. A maximum of 100 quarter hours may be transferred 
from a junior college. At least half of the courses in the major field must 
be taken at Armstrong. 

8. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a degree may be 
taken through correspondence or extension courses. No correspon- 
dence courses may be used to meet requirements in the major field or 
the related field for the bachelor's degree. No correspondence course 
may be taken while a student is enrolled at Armstrong State College 
without prior approval of the Vice President and the head of the 
department in which the student is majoring. Correspondence credit 
will not be accepted for courses in English composition or foreign 
language. 

Readmission of Former Students 

A student who has not been enrolled at Armstrong for one or more 
quarters must apply for readmission on a form provided by the Admissions 
Office. This requirement does not apply to students who do not register for 
courses during the summer quarter. A former student who has not at- 
tended another college since leaving Armstrong may be readmitted pro- 
vided he is not on suspension at the time he wishes to reenter. A former 
student who has attended another college since leaving Armstrong must 
meet requirements as listed in the bulletin in effect at the time of his 
return. 



Transient Students 

Transient student status means that a student is admitted to Armstrong 
State College only for a specified period of time, normally for one quarter. 
An applicant for transient status must file a regular application form and 



submit a statement from his Dean or registrar that he is in good standing 
and has permission to take specific courses at Armstrong to be transferred 
to his own institution when satisfactorily completed. Since transient stu- 
dents are not admitted as regular Armstrong students, transcripts of 
college work completed elsewhere are not usually required of such appli- 
cants. A transient student who wishes to remain at Armstrong longer than 
one quarter must submit an additional statement from his Dean or Regis- 
trar, or he must meet all requirements for regular admission as a t ransfer 
student. 



Armstrong State College Accelerated Program for 
High School Students 

High school students who have completed the eleventh grade, who have 
met the criteria for admission to the program and who maintain its stan- 
dards will be permitted to enroll for college credit in at least one course but 
not more than two courses each quarter at Armstrong State College while 
they complete the senior year of high school. Upon graduation from high 
school, these students will be admitted as regular students of the College. 

Through this program, a student may complete over two-thirds of the 
freshman year of college before he begins his regular college career. 
Students accepted in the program may choose any freshman course for 
which they meet all prerequisites, with permission of their high school 
principal or counselor and college advisor. 

A student forfeits the privilege of this program if in any quarter his 
grade in the course is below C or his high school average in academic 
courses is below T B. 

The College will consider a student for this program only upon written 
recommendation of his high school principal or counselor. In the view of the 
College, it is only these individuals w r ho can judge the circumstances that 
may make the program valuable and practicable for any student. 

To be admitted to the program a student must satisfy all of these 
criteria: 

1. written recommendation by the Principal or counselor of the high 
school; 

2. completion of the eleventh grade in an accredited high school; 

3. a combined verbal and mathematics SAT score of 1,000; 

4. a minimum grade-point-average of 3.0 in high school work completed. 

Early Admission and Joint Enrollment Programs 

Armstrong State College offers an early admission program for those 
students who have completed the eleventh grade in high school and who 
have demonstrated outstanding academic potential. The criteria for ad- 
mission to this program are the same as those listed for the Accelerated 
Program. 

Additionally, the college cooperates with the Chatham County School 
System in the offering of a joint enrollment program which is an early 

2Q 



admission program allowing the student to enroll full-time at the college 
while remaining on the rolls of his local high school. After successfully 
meeting all established criteria for the early admission program, the 
student will be awarded a high school diploma at the end of his freshman 
year in college. For further information on this program to the prospective 
applicant should consult his high school counselor and/or request informa- 
tion from the Admissions Office at Armstrong State College. 

Foreign Students 

It is recommended that, whenever possible, foreign students begin their 
attendance at the college in the fall quarter. The college also recommends 
that a foreign student attend an ELS language center prior to enrollment. 
(Applications for ELS are available from the Admissions Coordinator, 
ELS Language Center, 3331 Ocean Park Blvd. Suite 201, Santa Monica, 
California 90405. 

A student from a country other than the United States who is interested 
in attending Armstrong must meet the following requirements before 
application is made: 

1. He must have met the requirements of freshman applicants. 

2. He must have an official transcript of his academic record mailed to 
the Admissions Office at Armstrong with an official translation. 

3. He must take the SAT of the College Entrance Examination Board in 
the testing center nearest his home and ask that the results be sent to 
Armstrong. 

4. He must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
and score a minimum of 500 for consideration for admission to the 
college. 

5. He must submit a statement of financial resources prior to atten- 
dance. 

6. He must show proof of adequate health and life insurance. 

If the applicant meets the academic requirements for admission, he will 
be sent an application form. After it has been returned and approved, the 
applicant will be sent an 1-20 Form (I-20A and I-20B), which he can take to 
the American consul to ask for a student visa. When he arrives on campus, 
he will be tested in English composition for class placement. 

No scholarships are available for students who are not legal residents of 
Georgia. All foreign students must pay non-resident fees. 

Admission of Veterans 

After having been accepted at Armstrong State College and upon re- 
ceipt of Certification of Eligibility and Entitlement from the Veterans 
Administration, veterans may attend under Public Law 358 (Veterans 
Readjustment Benefit Act of 1966), Public Law 815 (disabled), Public Law 
894 (disabled), Public Law 634 (war orphans), or Public Law 361 (children 
of permanently disabled veterans). Students under Public Laws 358, 361, 
or 634 should be prepared to pay tuition and fees at the time of registration. 

40 



Applicants Sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation 

Those applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or other com- 
munity agencies must apply at least six (6) weeks before the beginning of 
any quarter to insure proper processing of applications. 

Admission to the Associate in Science Degree 
Program in Nursing 

Nursing requires a variety of skills and aptitudes and ol'\\'V> opportuni- 
ties for service at differing levels of expertise. The associate degree nurse 
utilizes theories and principles from bio-psycho-social sciences and nursing 
as a basis for the nursing process. He/she uses the nursing process to 
support, promote or alter the client's adaptive state in response to identi- 
fied, commonly occurring, health stressors. The associate degree nurse is 
prepared to work co-operatively with colleagues on the nursing team in 
those health agencies where the setting is structured and supervision is 
available. The candidate for the associate degree nursing program should 
have good physical and mental health as well as those personal qualifica- 
tions appropriate for nursing. 

The Associate in Science degree program in Nursing is approved by the 
Georgia Board of Nursing and is fully accredited by the National L< agtu 
for Nursing (NLN). 

General Information 

Admission to Armstrong State College does not in any way guarantee 
formal admission to the Associate Degree Program in Nursing. It is 
important that the applicant for admission to this program file all papers 
required for admission consideration as early as possible in the academic 
year preceding the Fall Quarter in which the applicant wishes to enroll. It 
is recommended that interested people who have been away from school 
for a considerable period of time enroll in at least one academic course in an 
accredited college of their choice during the year prior to application to the 
Associate Degree Nursing Program. 

The Admissions Committee in the Department of Nursing will act only 
on completed applications. Admission decisions will normally be made in 
April each year. When the class has been filled, admissions will be closed. 
Students who qualify for admission but who are not admitted because of 
lack of space may re-apply for the following year's class, repeating all 
application procedures. Students admitted for a given academic year must 
enter the Nursing Program during that academic- year or re-apply for 
admission for any subsequent year. Determination of admission to the 
Nursing Program is a function of the Nursing Faculty. 

Transfer students must meet the minimum criteria for admission to The 
Department of Associate Degree Nursing as stated. Credit for nursing 
courses and science courses taken prior to application to the Nursing 
Program must be approved by The Department of Associate Deg 
Nursing. 



The major part of the applicant's high school work should be in the 
college preparatory area. Because of the heavy emphasis on science in the 
nursing curriculum, it is important that the applicant have a strong founda- 
tion in biology, chemistry, and mathematics. The quality of the applicant's 
high school work in English and Social Studies is important in the total 
evaluation of the qualifications for admission to the program. 

In addition to the usual college tuition and fees, the student in the 
Associate degree Nursing Program must purchase uniforms and some 
supplies and equipment. Each student is required to wear the official 
insignia of the Nursing Program on an approved uniform. Approximately 
two weeks before the opening of school, each student admitted to the 
program will receive information, along with approximate charges, con- 
cerning supplies, equipment, and uniforms needed for the Fall Quarter. 
Students in the program are responsible for providing their own transpor- 
tation to and from the community hospitals and other health agencies 
which furnish their facilities for use in clinical instruction within the 
program. 

Before registering for the first nursing courses, each student must have 
(1) proof of nursing liability insurance; (2) a satisfactory health record; 
(3) successfully completed all English and Mathematics diagnostic re- 
quirements, if applicable. 

How to Apply 

1. Complete all papers required in the application for admission to Arm- 
strong State College. The procedures for admission to the College are 
outlind in this section of the Bulletin. Mark the application For Nursing 
Only. 

2. An applicant for admission to the Associate Degree program in Nursing 
will not be considered until the student has received regular admission 
to the College. 

3. The applicant must send SAT scores and the appropriate transcripts to 
the Department of Nursing (in addition to those submitted as part of the 
procedures required for admission to the College). 

4. When the applicant has been admitted to the College as a regular 
student and when the Department of Nursing has received the 
applicant's transcripts and SAT scores, he/she will be given an applica- 
tion form for admission to the Associate Degree program in Nursing. 

5. Applicants who are on academic probation or suspension from another 
college will not be considered for admission to the program. 

Criteria for Admission 

Applicants who meet the following minimum criteria will be considered 
for admission to the program at the time of application. The actual deter- 
mination of admission of applicants to the Nursing program is a function of 
the Nursing faculty. 

1 . a combined score of 750 on the verbal and mathematics sections of the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board, 



withascore of not less than 350 on the verbal section and a score ofnot loss 
than 350 on the mathematics section; 

2. a minimum grade-point average of2.5 (based on a L0 scale) in a high 
school curriculum which includes natural and social sciences; 

3. a minimum overall adjusted college grade-point average of 2.0 (based 
on a 4.0 scale), if applicable. Within this overall 2.0 grade-point average, a 
2.0 grade-point average for any courses taken from within the General 
Requirements listed in the Associate degree curriculum in this Bulletin, 
with no more than one repeat grade among these course 

Applicants who do not meet the criteria for admission outlined above 
may apply for admission after having met the following criteria. 

1. completion of the following specific General Requirements as listed in 
the Associate degree curriculum in this Bulletin: 

two courses selected from Chemistry 201, Zoology 208, Zoology 209 with 

grades of "C" or better; 

three courses selected from English 111, 112; History 251 or 252; Political 

Science 113; Psychology 101 with a 2.0 average or better. 

These five courses must be completed no later than the end of the Winter 

Quarter prior to the Fall Quarter for which admission Is sought. 

2. maintenance of an overall adjusted college grade-point average of 2. 
(based on a 4.0 scale), with a grade-point average of 2.0 for any com 
taken within the General Requirements of the Associate degree curricu- 
lum in addition to those listed above. 

3. No more than one repeat grade in any of the General Requirements of 
the Associate Degree curriculum. 

Time Limit for Program Completion 

Students must complete the Associate degree program within thn 
consecutive academic years from the date of their initial admission to the 
program. Students who do not complete the program within this time limit 
must reapply for admission, meet current criteria for admission, and have 
their previous credits evaluated at the time of their subsequent admission. 
Students who are readmitted must met course requirements in effect at 
the time of their readmission. 

Readmission to the Program 

Students who have been admitted to and enrolled in The Associate 
Degree Program in Nursing but have been involuntarily suspended from 
the program for academic reasons or have withdrawn from the program, 
may apply for readmission only if they have maintained an overall adjusted 
college grade-point average of 2.0, have earned a 2.0 average in all coin 
taken from within The General Requirements of Tin- Associate Degree 
curriculum with not more than one repeat from among these courses and 
have passed each science course attempted with a "('" or better in at l< 
two of these courses. Students must reenter no later than one year from 
the time of suspension or withdrawal. If they do not reenter within one 
year, they will be required to apply as a new student, meeting the admis- 
sion criteria and progression criteria in effect at that time. 



Admission to the Bachelor of Science Degree 
Program in Nursing 

The Baccalaureate Nursing Department at Armstrong State College 
offers a curriculum which provides entering freshmen, transfer students, 
and Registered Nurses the opportunity to earn the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing. The major portion of the applicant's high school work 
should be in the college preparatory area since nursing builds upon the 
sciences, languages, mathematics and social studies. 

Applicants to the Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Program must be 
admitted to Armstrong State College prior to making application to the 
Nursing Major. Students admitted to Armstrong State College must meet 
the admission requirements of the Baccalaureate Nursing Department to 
be eligible for admission to the Pre-nursing classification or the Nursing 
Major. Admission to the Nursing Major is the function of the Nursing 
Admissions Committee. The Admissions Committee acts only on comple- 
ted applications. 

When the class is filled, the Admissions Committee will close admis- 
sions. Students who qualify but who are not admitted because of lack of 
space may reapply for the next quarter that students are admitted. Stu- 
dents will be admitted to the Nursing major Fall and Winter Quarters. 

Because clinical learning experiences are provided in a variety of set- 
tings, students will be responsible for providing their own transportation 
to and from clinical areas. Armstrong State College does not provide 
student housing. Students should contact the Office of Student Affairs for 
information regarding housing available in the area. 

Students will be required to purchase an official uniform, health and 
liability insurance, and supplies and equipment as determined by the 
Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty. Each student will be required to wear the 
official insignia of the Nursing Program on each uniform. Information 
regarding medical histories, liability insurance, uniforms, supplies and 
equipment will be provided after admission to the Nursing major. 

Criteria for Admission — Pre-Nursing 

Freshman applicants may be admitted to the Baccalaureate degree 
program with a pre-Nursing classification at the beginning of any academic 
quarter. Such admission does not guarantee admission to the Nursing 
major. These applicants must: 

1. have regular admission status at the College; 

2. have a minimum SAT verbal score of 350; 

3. have a minimum SAT mathematics score of 350; 

4. have a verbal/mathematics combined SAT of at least 750; 

5. qualify prior to or during the first quarter of their attendance for 
admission to English 111 and Mathematics 101 (this qualification may 
be achieved by presentation of a SAT verbal score of 500 and a SAT 
mathematics score of 420 or by taking and passing the placement 
examinations for each of the courses or by successfully completing 
the appropriate remedial English and Mathematics courses). 



Transfer students must have a2.0 cumulative grade-point-average in all 

appropriate college course work to be admitted with the pre-Nursing 

classification. 

Criteria for Admission to the Nursing Major 

Admission to the Nursing major is on a space-available basis and is 

limited to the best qualified students as determined by the Admission- 
Committee for the Baccalaureate Program. Admission criteria include: 

1. Completion of 49 hours of prerequisite course work as indicated in I he 
pre-Nursing curriculum; 

2. A grade of"C" or better in each pre-professional course; no more than 
one repeat grade will be acceptable; 

3. An adjusted GPA of 2.5 in all appropriate course work attempted. 
See curriculum requirements. 

Transfer applicants with credit beyond the sophomore level must fulfill 
the requirements for both pre-Nursing and pre-professional courses as 
indicated in the curriculum for the Nursing major. Their levelof entry will 
be determined by the Admissions Committee for the Baccalaureate pro- 
gram. No more than 100 credit hours will be accepted in transfer from a 
junior college. A transfer student must take the Regents' Examination 
during his/her first quarter of attendance, if he/she has earned 15 quarter 
hours or more of credit. Registered Nurse applicants must meet the 
criteria established for transfer students and must also submit proof of 
licensure. After admission to the Nursing major, registered nurses may 
challenge a maximum of 30 credit hours of Nursing course- through oral 
and/or written examinations. Students will be awarded senior-level status 
upon completion of 135 credit hours of appropriate course work (including 
successful performance on challenge examinations and successful comple- 
tion of BSN 300 and 306). CLEP examinations for general education 
courses may be taken, with the total credit for these examinations not to 
exceed 25 percent ofthe required quarter hours acceptable for the Nursing 
major. 

Time Limit for Program Completion 

Students must complete the Baccalaureate Nursing Program within 
four (4) consecutive years from the date of their initial admission to tin- 
Nursing major. Students who do not complete the program within this 
time limit must apply for readmission, meet current criteria for admission, 
and have their previous credits evaluated. Students who are granted 
readmission must meet course requirements in effect at the time. 

Readmission Prqcedun % 

1. The student must complete the readmission application for Armstr 
State College and the Nursing major. 

2. The student will be required to meet curriculum requirements in ei ':■ 

at the time of readmission. 



3. The student's readmission will be based upon space available and rec- 
ommendation by the Admissions Committee of the Baccalaureate Pro- 
gram. 

Admission to the Associate in Science Degree 
Program in Dental Hygiene 

The profession of Dental Hygiene is an ideal career for individuals 
interested in science and health services. The growing and constant de- 
mand for graduate dental hygienists assures regular hours and good com- 
pensation. 

A dental hygienist works under the general supervision of a dentist and 
performs a number of dental functions. The hygienist's duties usually 
include performing oral prophylaxis (cleaning of teeth), instructing pa- 
tients in dental health, taking, developing and mounting dental x-rays, 
applying fluorides and sometimes assisting the dentist in chairside and 
laboratory duties. 

There are certain personal qualifications which are essential for a suc- 
cessful dental hygienist. These are good health, neat appearance, high 
moral character, a desire to be of service to others, and the ability to get 
along well with people. 

There are no definite age requirements or restrictions for the basic 
Dental Hygiene program. However, all applicants must be graduates of an 
accredited high school or its equivalent. Students may be either married or 
single and must be citizens of the United States, either natural born or 
naturalized. 

General Information 

Admission to Armstrong State College does not in any way guarantee 
admission to the Associate Degree Program in Dental Hygiene. Appli- 
cants must first be accepted for admission to the college with Regular 
Admission status; they then must meet the requirements for admission to 
the Associate Degree program in Dental Hygiene before being accepted as 
students in that program. 

The purpose of the program is to meet the need for individuals educated 
in this rapidly growing and important health profession. Dental Hygienists 
are in demand to provide dental health services in private dental offices, 
civil service positions, school programs, and various public health fields. 
They practice under the supervision of a dentist and must pass a written 
national board examination and a state board examination for licensure. 

Admission to the program is limited to thirty students in each class. 
Students enroll in the Fall Quarter of each year. Applications for admission 
should be completed by April 15 for the Fall Quarter. These applications 
must include a transcript of academic work to that date. A complete 
transcript must be submitted as soon as possible thereafter. 

The major part of the applicant's high school work should be in the 
college preparatory area. Because of the heavy emphasis on science in the 



dental hygiene curriculum, it is important that the applicant have a strong 
foundation in biology, chemistry, and mathematics. The quality of the 
applicant's high school work in English and Social Studio Is important in 
the total evaluation of the qualifications for admission to the program. 

Applicants who are on academic probation or suspension from another 
college will not be considered for admission to the program. 1 fnless specifi- 
cally approved by the Head of the Department, credit will not be accepted 
for courses taken in another school of Dental Hygiene. 

In addition to the normal college tuition and fees, the student in the 
Dental Hygiene program must purchase some supplies and equipment. 
Only new, complete, and approved instrument kits are acceptable. Bach 
student is required to wear the official uniform of the program. Thi 
uniforms are ordered during the Fall Quarter. Approximately two weeks 
before the opening of school, each student admitted to the program will 
receive information, with approximate costs, concerning supplies and 
equipment needed for the Fall Quarter. 

Armstrong State College does not provide student housing. For infor- 
mation regarding housing available in the area, contact the Office of 
Student Affairs. Students are responsible for providing their own trans- 
portation to and from community agencies when they are assigned to these 
agencies for field experiences. 

Desired Admission Criteria 

Factors influencing the decisions of the Dental Hygiene Admissions 
Committee are: 

1. A 2.5 or better high school grade-point average. 

2. A SAT score (composite verbal and mathematics) of 850 or above. 

3. An average score on the Dental Hygiene Aptitude test of 1.0. This 
test is recommended but is not required. 

4. Dental office experience. 

5. A 2.0 grade-point average on all previous college work, if applicable. 
Students transferring from another program within the college or 
from another college must have this average to be considered (<>v 
admission. The 2.0 average must be maintained to date of actual 
matriculation in the program. 

The Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee will give special consider- 
ation to applicants who have completed one year of college work and who 
havecompleted Chemistry 201 or Zoology 208 (or their equivalents) with a 
grade of "C" or better. 

After all credentials have been received, the applicant may request a 
personal interview with the Admissions Committee to discuss matter- 
relative to their applications. 

Readmission to the Program 

Students who have been admitted to and have enrolled in the Dental 
Hygiene program but who have either withdrawn or have been dropped 
from the program may apply for readmission to the program only if they 



have a cumulative college grade-point average of 2.0 (C) at the time they 
wish to reenter. 

How to Apply 

1. Complete all papers required in the application for admission to Arm- 
strong State College. The procedures for admission to the College are 
outlined in this section of iheBulletin. Mark the application For Dental 
Hygiene Only. These forms are to be returned to the Admissions office. 

2. Complete and return to the Department of Dental Hygiene the personal 
data form, the dental form, and a recent photograph. 

3. It is recommended, but not required, that all applicants take the Dental 
Hygiene Aptitude Test. In order for the test scores to reach the Depart- 
ment of Dental Hygiene before April 15, the test should be taken during 
the Fall or Winter testing period. 

Applicants may address the Director of Admissions or the Head of the 
Department of Dental Hygiene at Armstrong State College if they require 
additional information concerning admission to the Associate in Science 
degree program in Dental Hygiene. 

Registration 

Complete instructions concerning registration are made available to all 
students at the beginning of the registration period. Registration includes 
academic advisement, selection of courses, enrollment in classes, and 
payment of fees. Students who are employed may complete and renew 
annually a request for priority in registration before or early in the prere- 
gistration week in the Registrar's Office. Full details regarding registra- 
tion are provided to all incoming students after they have been approved 
for admission to the College. 

Residency Requirements of the Board of Regents 

To be considered a legal resident of Georgia, the applicant must estab- 
lish the following facts to the satisfaction of the Registrar. 

1. (a) If a person is 18 years of age or older, he or she may register as a 
resident student only upon a showing that he or she has been a legal 
resident of Georgia for a period of at least twelve months immedi- 
ately preceding the date of registration. 

(b) No emancipated minor or person 18 years of age or older shall be 
deemed to have gained or acquired in-state residence status for fee 
purposes while attending any educational institution in this State, in 
the absence of a clear demonstration that he or she has in fact 
established legal residence in this State. 

2. If a person is under 18 years of age, he or she may register as a 
resident student only upon a showing that his or her supporting 
parent or guardian has been a legal resident of Georgia for a period 
of at least twelve months immediately preceding the date of regis- 
tration. 



3. A person stationed in Georgia who is on full-time, active military 
duty with the armed forces and his or her spouse and dependent 
children may register upon payment of resident \\'i-> even though 
they have not been legal residents of Georgia for the preceding 
twelve months. 

4. A full-time employee of the University System and his or her spouse 
and dependent children may register on the payment of resident 
fees even though he or she has not been a legal resident of < Seorgia 
for the twelve months. 

5. Non-resident graduate students who hold teaching or research 
sistantships requiring at least one-third time service may register 
as students in the institution in which they are employed on pay- 
ment of resident fees. 

6. Full-time teachers in the public schools of ( Georgia and their depen- 
dent children may enroll as students in the University System 
institutions on the payment of resident fees, when such teachers 
have been legal residents of Georgia for the immediately preceding 
nine months, were engaged in teaching during such nine month 
period, and have been employed to teach full-time in the public 
schools of Georgia during the ensuing school year. 

7. All aliens shall be classified as non-resident students; provided, 
however, that an alien who is living in this country under a visa 
permitting permanent residence shall have the same privilege of 
qualifying for resident status for fee purposes as a citizen of the 
United States. 

8. Foreign students who attend institutions of the University System 
under financial sponsorship of civic or religious groups located in 
this State, may be enrolled upon the payment of resident 
provided the number of such foreign students in any one institution 
does not exceed the quota approved by the Board of Regents for that 
institution. 

9. If the parents or legal guardian of a minor change his or her 
residence to another state following a period of legal residence in 
Georgia, the minor may continue to take courses for a period of 
twelve months on the payment of resident fees. After the expiration 
of the twelve month period the student may continue his registra- 
tion only upon the payment of fees at the non-resident rate. 

10. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as guardian 
of anon-resident minor, such minor will not be permitted 1 1 
as a resident student until the expiration of one year from the date of 
court appointment, and then only upon proper showing that such 
appointment was not made to avoid payment of the non-resident 
fees. 



-10 



VI. ACADEMIC 
REGULATIONS 

Academic Advisement 

Academic advisement is made available to each student at Armstrong 
State College. The Vice President gives overall direction to the advise- 
ment program, with the appropriate Department Head coordinating ad- 
visement activities within the various departments. The student is ex- 
pected to seek advisement from the department in which he is taking a 
major. The advisor maintains a record of his advisees' academic progress 
from quarter to quarter. The student who does not take advantage of the 
academic advisement program at the College should be reminded that he is 
responsible for fulfilling the requirements of his degree program and must 
be extremely careful to observe all regulations for admission to courses, 
such as the requirement of prerequisite courses, sometimes with a speci- 
fied grade. Credit for a course is invalid unless all prerequisite require- 
ments are observed. 

During summer orientation, or on registration day, ail new students, 
both freshman and transfer students, will meet in groups with advisors. At 
this time, students make a selection of appropriate classes for their quarter 
of entry. The proper time for meeting with faculty advisors from that point 
on is during the advisement periods each quarter listed in the college 
calendar. All faculty advisors, however, will be happy to give academic 
counseling at any time during a given quarter, if students need to talk with 
them. 

During the six quarters of his junior and senior years, the student must 
have his course selection approved in writing each quarter before registra- 
tion by an advisor from the department in which he is majoring. During 
these last two years, the advisor will keep a record of the courses the 
student takes and the grades he makes, and, at least two quarters prior to 
graduation, when the student obtains the Application for Graduation, the 
advisor will signify to the registrar that the student has completed all 
requirements for graduation in his major program up to that time, and is, 
therefore, recommended for graduation upon his completion of the remain- 
ing requirements in his degree program. 

Relating to Degree Requirements 

1. Each student is responsible for fulfilling the requirements of the 
degree program which he has chosen, in accordance with the regula- 
tions of the college catalogue. 

2. Exceptions to course requirements for a degree are permitted only 
with the written approval of the appropriate Dean, upon the recom- 
mendation of the department head. 



KA 



3. A student will normally graduate under the catalogue in effect at the 
time of his admission to the College. Armstrong State College, how- 
ever, reserves the right to change any provision listed in this cata- 
logue, including but not limited to academic requirements for gradua- 
tion, without actual notice to individual students. If a student has been 
absent from the College for two or more consecutive years, he should 
expect to meet all requirements in effect at the time of his return. 

4. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a degree may 
consist of courses taken by correspondence, extension, or examina- 
tion. No correspondence courses may be used to meet the require- 
ments in the major field or related fields for the Bachelor's degree or in 
English composition or foreign language. No correspondence com 
may be taken while a student is enrolled, without prior approval of the 
appropriate Dean and the head of the department in which the student 
is majoring. 

5. By State law, one of the requirements for a diploma or certificate from 
schools supported by the state of Georgia is a demonstration of profi- 
ciency in United States history and government and in Georgia history 
and government. A student at Armstrong State College may demon- 
strate such proficiency by: 

a. Examinations — Students may take either the relevant CLE P. 
College Board Admissions Testing Program Achievement Test, or 
Advanced Placement test (making their own arrangements). 

b. Credit in the following— for U.S. and Georgia Constitution: Politi- 
cal Science 113; for U.S. and Georgia History 251 or 252 or any upper 
division course in U.S. History. 

6. To qualify for the baccalaureate degree, a student must earn at Arm- 
strong at least 45 quarter hours of credit applicable toward the degree. 
Additionally, the student must complete successfully at Armstrong a 
majority of the upper division credits required in his major field of 
study. For the Associate Degree, the student must complete at least 
45 quarter hours of course work at Armstrong State College. 

7. For graduation the student must earn an overall-average of 2.0 or 
better considering work taken at all colleges, computed in such man- 
ner that a course will be counted only once, regardless of the number of 
times that it has been repeated. The grade earned in the last attempt 
will determine the number of honor points assigned for graduation. 
Additionally, the student must earn a grade-point average of 2.0 or 
better on each of the following: 

a. all work at Armstrong 

b. all courses in the major field. 

8. To qualify for a second baccalaureate degree, a candidate must earn at 
Armstrong at least 45 additional hours of credit and, of course, meet all 
qualitative requirements for the degree. 

9. Before a degree will be conferred upon a student by Armstrong State 
College he must pay all fees and must submit to the Registrar his 
completed Application for Graduation two quarters before gradua- 
tion. A candidate for a degree, unless excused in writing by the 



President, Vice President, or Dean of Student Affairs, must attend 
the graduation exercises at which a degree is to be conferred upon him. 
10. Each student must successfully complete the Regents' Examination 
and must take an Exit Examination in his major field as requirements 
for graduation. Candidates for a second baccalaureate degree are 
exempted from the Regents' Examination requirement. 

Course and Study Load 

The normal course load for a full-time student is 15-18 quarter hours (and 
a course in physical education during the freshman and sophomore years). 
An average student should devote at least thirty hours each week, in 
addition, to course preparation. 

A full-time student is defined as one who is registered for 12 or more 
quarter hours. A part-time student is one registered for less than 12 
quarter hours. A student should plan about ten hours preparation per 
week for each 5 quarter hour course. 

Classification of Students 

A student who has earned 45 quarter hours of credit will be classified as a 
sophomore; 90 quarter hours of credit, as a junior; 135 quarter hours of 
credit, as a senior. 

Permission for Overload or Courses at Another 

College 

Permission to enroll for more than 18 quarter hours will be granted by 
the Registrar to a student: 

1. with an average grade of "B" for full-time enrollment in the preceding 
quarter, or 

2. with an overall grade-point average of 3.0, or 

3. requiring an extra course in one of the two quarters prior to gradua- 

tion. 

No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 quarter hours in 
any one quarter. 

A student who is on academic probation will not be permitted to register 
for more than 18 quarter hours in any one quarter. 

Exceptions to these limitations may be made only by the appropriate 
Dean. 

A student enrolled at Armstrong who at the same time takes course for 
credit at another college may not transfer such credit to Armstrong, unless 
he has obtained in advance the written permission of the appropriate Dean 
at Armstrong State College to register for those courses. 



Reports and Grades 

The faculty feels that students in college should be held accountable for 
their scholarship. Accordingly, grade reports, warnings of deficient schol- 
arship and all such notices are not sent to parents or guardians by the 
Registrar. Instead, the students themselves receive these reports and art- 
expected to contact their advisors whenever their work is unsatisfactory. 
Grade reports are issued at the end of each quarter. Each student has 
access to an advisor; in addition, the Registrar and all instructors are 
available to help any student seeking assistance. 

Armstrong State College awards the following grades which are used in 
the determination of a student's grade-point average: 





Grade 


Honor Points 


A 


(excellent) 


4.0 


B 


(good) 


3.0 


C 


(satisfactory) 


2.0 


D 


(passing) 


1.0 


F 


(failing) 


0.0 


WI 


(withdrew, failing) 


0.0 



The student's cumulative grade-point average recorded on his perma- 
nent record card is determined by dividing the total honor points earned by 
the total hours attempted. The student's adjusted grade-point average is 
determined by dividing the total honor points earned by the total hours 
attempted, with hours and honor points for repeated courses not duplica- 
ted in the calculation. 

Armstrong State College also uses the following symbols for grade 
reports. These symbols carry no honor points and are not included in the 
determination of either the cumulative grade-point average or the ad- 
justed grade-point average. 

Symbol Explanation 

W withdrew, no penalty 

I incomplete 

S satisfactory 

U unsatisfactory 

V audit 

K credit by examination 

P passing, special studies 

A student who receives a report of "I" for a course should consult his 
instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements of the course. 
An "I" which has not been removed by the middle of the succeeding 
quarter is automatically changed to an 44 F" unless the instructor recom- 
mends an extension in writing addressed to the appropriate Dean. The 
and "U" symbols may be utilized for completion of degree requirements 
other than academic course work (such as student teaching, clinical prac- 
tica, etc.). Withdrawal without penalty (W) is not permitted after the 
quaterly dates listed in the "Academic Calendar" in this Bulletin as the 



dates for mid-term. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the Vice 
President and will be approved only on the basis of hardship. 

Honors 

Dean's List: Students enrolled for at least ten quarter hours of course 
work who earn an honor point average of at least 3.5 will be placed on the 
Dean's List, published quarterly. Only course work taken at Armstrong 
will be used in the computation of Dean's List honors. 

Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point average of 
3.2 through 3.499 will be graduated cum laude. 

Magna Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point 
average of 3.5 through 3.799 will be graduated magna cum laude. 

Summa Cum Laude: Those students graduated with an honor point 
average of 3.8 through 4.0 will be graduated sum.ma cum laude. 

All work attempted at Armstrong and other accredited institutions will 
be considered in computing honors for graduation. 

Attendance 

The control of student attendance at class meetings and the effect of a 
student's attendance on his grades in a course are left entirely to the 
discretion of the instructor. 

A student is responsible for knowing everything that is announced, 
discussed, or lectured upon in class as well as for mastering all assigned 
reading; he is also responsible for turning in on time all assignments and 
tests, including recitation and unannounced quizzes. The best way to meet 
these responsibilities is to attend classes regularly. An instructor may 
drop a student from any class with a grade of "F" if he thinks that the 
excessive absence prevents that student from satisfactorily fulfilling his 
responsibilities. If such excessive absence is the result of prolonged illness, 
death in the family, college business, or religious holidays, the withdrawal 
grade will be either "W" or "F" depending on the student's status at the 
time he was dropped. The instructor will be responsible for informing each 
of his classes at its first meeting what constitutes excessive absence in that 
particular class. Each student is responsible for knowing the attendance 
regulation in his class and for complying with it. 

Satisfactory Progress 

For purpose of financial aid, a student is deemed to be making satisfac- 
tory progress toward a degree until such time as he/she is placed on 
academic suspension from the College. The student, upon his readmission 
to the College, must, in the first quarter after readmission, earn a 2.0 
grade-point-average before he/she is again considered to be making satis- 
factory progress toward a degree. The award of financial aid will be 
suspended during this quarter. 



Academic Probation and Dismissal 

A student who maintains or exceeds the grade-point average indicated 
below for quarter hours attempted will be considered in good standing. 

When a student first falls below the GPA required for the appropriate 
accumulation of hours, he will be placed on academic warning. If he does 
not raise his GPA to a satisfactory level the next quarter, he will be place* 1 
on academic probation. 



Quarter Hours Attempted at 


Required Adjusted 


Armstrong and Elsewhere 


GPA 


0-15 


1.3 


16-30 


1.4 


31-45 


1.5 


46-60 


1.6 


61-75 


1.7 


76-90 


1.8 


91-120 


1.9 


121-135 and over 


2.0 



A student on academic probation who raises his adjusted grade-point 
average during the probationary quarter to equal or to exceed the appro- 
priate figure in the foregoing table will be removed from academic proba- 
tion. One who fails to achieve the required adjusted average, but who does 
earn an average of at least 2.0 during the probationary quarter, will be 
continued on probation for the next quarter of attendance. The College 
places no restrictions on the extracurricular activities of students who are 
placed on academic probation. Any student on academic probation should 
plan both his curricular and extracurricular activities with care, consulting 
with his advisor in so doing. 

The student on academic probation who does not achieve the required 
adjusted average or who does not earn an average of at least 2.0 for the 
quarter in which he is on probation will be suspended from the college for 
one quarter. A student who is on academic suspension for the first time. 
however, has the option of attending summer school without having to 
appeal the suspension. A third academic suspension is final. 

A student reentering the college after academic suspension is placed on 
probation and must meet the requirements listed above. 

A student suspended for academic reasons may appeal by letter to the 
Committee on Academic Standing to be delivered to the Office of Student 
Affairs. Such a letter of appeal should state the nature of any extenuating 
circumstances relating to the academic deficiency; the letter should he 
received no later than 9 a.m. on registration day. No action will be taken < m 
appeals received later than 12:00 noon on the day following registration 
day. The action of the Committee on Academic Standing is final. 

Repeating Courses 

Any course for which a grade of "D" or "F" has been recorded may be 
repeated with the last grade to be counted in the adjusted grade-point 



average. A student who repeats any such courses should complete a 
"Notice of Course Repetition" form available in the Office of the Registrar. 

Dropping Courses 

A student desiring to drop a course after the quarter has begun must 
obtain a Drop- Add Notice in the Office of the Registrar. The notice must be 
signed by the instructor of the course being dropped and returned by the 
student to the Registrar's Office. 

A student who drops a course not more than seven class days after the 
course begins will receive no grade for the course. A student who drops a 
course after the first seven class days and on or before the quarterly dates 
listed in the "Academic Calendar" in this Bulletin for mid-term will receive 
a "W" or a "WF" depending on his status in the course. A student may not 
drop a course without penalty following the quarterly dates listed in the 
"Academic Calendar" for mid-term. 

Withdrawing from College 

Any student who finds it necessary to withdraw from college must begin 
the process in the Office of Student Affairs. A formal withdrawal is 
required to insure that the student is eligible to return to Armstrong State 
College at a future date. Any refund to which a student is entitled will be 
considered on the basis of the date which appears on the withdrawal form. 

Auditing 

A regular student wishing to "audit" a course without receiving credit 
must obtain permission of the instructor before he registers for the course. 
During the registration process the student should request a special 
"audit" course card. (Policy for some courses forbids "auditing.") A stu- 
dent may not change from audit to credit status or from credit to audit 
status after he has completed the process of registration for a course. A 
student who audits a course will have a "V" recorded for that course on his 
transcript. The regular schedule of fees applied to auditors. 

Honor Code 

The Honor Code at Armstrong State College is dedicated to the proposi- 
tion that the protection of the grading system is in the interest of the 
student community. The Student Court is an institutional means to assure 
that the student community shall have primary disposition of infractions of 
the Honor Code and that students accused of such infractions shall enjoy 
those procedural guarantees traditionally considered essential to fair and 
impartial hearing, the foremost of which is the presumption of innocence 
until guilt be established beyond a reasonable doubt. 



I. Responsibilities of Students: 

All students must agree to abide by the rules of the Honor- ( 'ode. 
A student shall not be accepted at Armstrong State ( lollege unless 
he signs the following statement at the time of his first registration: 
"I have read the Honor Code of Armstrong State ( lollege. 1 under- 
stand the Code and agree that, as a student at Armstrong, I must 
comply with these requirements." This statement shall be printed 
on the application for admission to the college and must Designed by 
the student. The Honor Code shall be printed in the official bulletin 
and the Student Handbook. 

It will be the responsibility of the Student ( Jourt or its designated 
representative to conduct an orientation program at the beginning 
of each quarter for all newly entering students to explain fully the 
Honor Code and to allow full discussion of its requirements. 

Any student desiring assistance with any matter related to the 
Honor Code is invited to seek assistance in the Office of Student 
Affairs. 
II. Violations of the Honor Code: 

Violations of the Honor Code may be of two kinds: i a ) general and 
(b) those related to the peculiarities of specific course-relate* 1 prob- 
lems and to the understanding of individual instructors. Any in- 
structor whose conception of cheating would tend to enlarge or 
contract the general regulations defining cheating must explicitly 
notify the affected students of the qualifications to the general 
regulations which he wishes to stipulate. The following will be 
considered general violations of the Honor ('ode. 

1. Giving or receiving any unauthorizd help on any assignment, test 
or paper. The meaning of "unauthorized help" shall be made clear 
by the instructor of each class. 

2. Stealing when related to cheating. 

3. Plagiarizing. 

4. Giving perjured testimony before the Student Court. 

5. Suborning, attempting to suborn, or intimidating witness* 

6. Failing to report a suspected violation of the Honor Code. 
III. Reporting Violations of the Honor Code: 

Anyone wishing to report a violation may come to the < >\T\^ ■ 
Student Affairs for assistance in contacting members of the Student 
Court. 

A. Self-reporting: A student who has broken the Honor Code 
should report himself to a member of the Student Court. 

B. Anyone (faculty member or student) who is aware of a violation 
of the Honor Code must report the matter. This may be done in 
one of two ways: 

1. He may tell the person thought to be guilty to report nil 
toamember of the Student Court no later than the end of the 
next school day. After this designated time the person who is 
aware of the violation must inform a member of the Student 
Court so that the Student Court may contact the accused 
person if he has not already reported himself. 



2. He may report the suspected violation directly to a member 
of the Student Court without informing the accused. 
IV. The procedural rights of the students accused of violations of the 
Honor Code: 

The essence of the procedural rights of an accused is the right to a 
fair and impartial hearing and the right to be presumed innocent 
until proven guilty. Specific rights are as follows: 

1 . The accused will be notified in writing by the Student Court or its 
designated representative of the nature and details of the offense 
with which he is charged along with the name's of his accusers and 
the principal witnesses to be brought against him. This notifica- 
tion shall occur no less than three days prior to the date of the 
hearing. 

2. The accused has the right to counsel of his own choosing. Such 
counsel will not participate directly in the proceedings except to 
advise his client. It is expected that such counsel will be drawn 
from the college community. 

3. The accused and the person bringing the charges shall be af- 
forded an opportunity to present witnesses and documentary or 
other evidence. The accused and any individual bringing the 
charges shall have the right to cross examine all witnesses and 
may, where the witnesses cannot appear because of illness or 
other cause acceptable to the Court, present the sworn state- 
ment of the witnesses. The Court shall not be bound by formal 
rules governing the presentation of evidence, and it may con- 
sider any evidence presented which is of probative value in the 
case. 

4. The accused may not be made to bear witness against himself. 
The Court may not take the refusal of the accused to testify as 
evidence of guilt, but this proviso does not give the accused 
immunity from a hearing or from recommendations reached in a 
hearing simply because the accused does not testify. 

5. The accused shall have access to a complete audiotape of the 
hearing and to the record prepared by the secretary. 

6. The substantive facts of a case may be re-opened for consider- 
ation upon initiation of the accused acting through normal appeal 
channels. The accused shall not be put in double jeopardy. 

7. All witnesses will be sequestered from the hearing room during 
the course of a hearing. Witnesses may not discuss a pending 
case. 

8. By prior agreement, the accused will be allowed such observers 
of the hearing as may be commensurate with the space available. 
Otherwise, in the interests of the right of privacy of the accused, 
hearings will be private, except that the College may also have 
observers additional to the advisors to the Student Court. 

V. The Honor Code Commission, The Student Court Selection Com- 
mittee, The Student Court, and Advisers to the Court: 
A. Honor Code Commission 



It shall be the purpose of the Honor Code Commission to ad- 
minister the student academic honor code. The Commission will 
have the responsibility for revising and updating tin- student 
academic honor code as needs arise The Honor Code Commis- 
sion shall consist of the President, Vice-President, and Secre- 
tary of the Student Government Association and the current 
President and Secretary of Student Court together with three 
faculty members appointed by the President of the College. 

B. Student Court Selection Committee 

The Student Court Selection committee will select member- for 
the Student Court. The Student Court Selection Committee will 
consist of two faculty members from the Honor Code Commis- 
sion, one of whom is the chairperson of that commission, two 
students from the Honor Code Commission, one of whom is a 
member of the Student Court, two faculty members from the 
Conduct Committee, one of whom is the chairperson of that 
committee, two students from the Conduct Committee, one of 
whom is a member of the Student Court, and the Dean of 
Students. 

C. Student Court 

1. The Student Court will be selected by the Student Court 
Selection Committee and will be composed of twelve stu- 
dents. Due consideration will be given to equitable appor- 
tionment of court members on the basis of academic cl; 
race, and sex. Students on academic probation may not 
serve. All appointments w r ill be issued and accepted in writ- 
ing. Appointments will be made during Spring Quarter in 
time for newly elected members of the Court to assume their 
duties by May 1. Appointments will be made as needed to 
keep the Student Court staffed to do business on a reasona- 
bly prompt basis. These appointments may constitute per- 
manent or temporary replacements as the Student Court 
Selection Committee deems necessary. 

2. The Student Court will elect a President. Vice-President, 
and a Secretary from its membership. The President will 
preside at all meetings. The Vice-President will assume the 
duties of the President if the President is absent. The Secre- 
tary will maintain written notes of all proceedings and 
audiotape records of all testimony, and will maintain exhibits 
of evidence which by their nature may reasonably be main- 
tained in the Court files. A quorum of the Court shall consist 
of eight members. A two-thirds majority secret ballot vote is 
required to reach a finding of guilty. All other questions may 
be decided by a simple majority vote. 

3. Constituency of the Student ( Jourt during t he Summer Quar- 
ter shall include all appointed members in attendance, and 
other shall be appointed to membership by the Student ( Jourt 
Selection Committee. 



4. Student Court Members shall examine their consciences 
carefully to determine whether they can in good conscience 
serve on a panel hearing a particular case, and in the event 
that there is any doubt, whatsoever, such members shall 
excuse themselves from duty on the specific panel in ques- 
tion. 
B. Advisers to the Court 

1. An adviser and an associate adviser to the Student Court 
shall be appointed by the President of the College. 

2. Ordinarily the adviser will serve in that office for one year 
only and usually will be succeeded in that position by the 
associate adviser. Therefore, after the initial appointments, 
only an associate adviser will ordinarily be appointed each 
year. The succession of an associate to the adviser position is 
deemed to occur on the last day of Spring Quarter. If, for any 
reason, the adviser is unable to complete his term, the associ- 
ate adviser shall succeed to the office of adviser and another 
associate adviser shall be appointed by the above proce- 
dures. If, during the Summer Quarter, neither adviser is on 
campus, a temporary adviser will be appointed. 

3. Duties of the adviser and the associate adviser: It shall be the 
duty of the adviser to consult with the Court and to offer 
advice to the President and members of the Court on sub- 
stantive and procedural questions. The adviser, or the asso- 
ciate adviser in the event the adviser is unable to attend, 
shall be present at all meetings and hearings of the Court. 
The Adviser may not vote nor may he participate directly in 
the conduct of hearings before the Court except through the 
chairman, or acting chairman, of the Court. The adviser 
should be governed at all times by the principle that a hearing 
before the student court is primarily a matter of student 
responsibility. 

VI. Procedures and Penalties adopted by the Student Court: 

The Student Court shall formulate its own bylaws governing 
internal organization and procedure. Such bylaws must be consis- 
tent with the Honor Code. 

A. Hearings shall be called by the Court President to be held on a 
date not less than three (3) nor more than ten (10) class days 
after notice to the accused as provided in Section IV-2. Excep- 
tions to these time requirements may be granted. 

B. Upon reaching a finding of guilty, the Court shall make a recom- 
mendation to the Vice President of the College as to the adminis- 
trative action it deems appropriate within the following limita- 
tions: 

1. A minimum penalty shall be loss of assignment or test credit 
for the assignment or test for violations involving cheating as 
specified in Section II, subsections 1, 2, and 3. Additional 
penalties such as reprimands, suspension, or others may be 
recommended for any aspects of Section II. 



2. Maximum penalty for a first offense of any type shall be 

suspension for a full calendar year-. 

3. Maximum penalty for a second offense may besuspension for 
three years. 

C. Immediately following a hearing, the accused will he informed of 
the Court's finding, and its recommendation to the Vice Presi 
dent of the college. If the finding is guilty, the accused will he 
informed that the Court may re-open the case with the consent 
of the accused for good cause, within a three week period. 

D. The Vice President of the College will inform all involved per- 
sons in writing of the action he has taken in view of Court 
recommendations. The Court Secretary will post public notice 
of the Vice President's action by case number without identify- 
ing the accused. 

VII. Appeals of Findings and Penalties: 

Should a student have cause to question the findings of the Court 
or the action of the Vice President of the College or both, he has the 
right to appeal. The channels of appeal are as follows: 
A. Court findings and/or the administrative action of the Vice 
President of the College may be appealed within five days by 
writing the President of the College. Further appeal procedures 
will conform to the appeal procedures of the College and of the 
Policies of the Board of Regents, University System of ( Georgia 
(a copy of these policies is available in the Library; see chapter 
on Students, section on appeals, page 165, 1969 edition). 
VIII. Supervision of the Student Court: 

As an institutional means of responding to reported infractions of 
the Honor Code, the Student Court is ultimately responsible to the 
President of the College. 

Supervision of the Student Court will be accomplished ordinarily 
through the Dean of Student Affairs and the Advisor.-. 
A. Dean of Student Affairs 

In accordance with Article VI, Section F, of the College 
Statutes, the Dean of Student Affairs will provide general su- 
pervision of the Student Court and will provide other guidance 
or services as directed by the President of the College. 
IX. Revision of the Honor code will require confirmation by the major- 
ity vote of those faculty and student body members voting. 



VII. General 
Requirements for 
Degree Programs 

University System Core Curriculum 

Each unit in the University System of Georgia requires as a Core 
Curriculum for all baccalaureate degree programs the following minimum 
number of quarter hours in the major areas of study: 

Minimum Quarter 
Areas of Study Hours Required 

I. Humanities, including, but not limited to grammar 

and composition and literature 20 

II. Mathematics and the natural sciences, including, but 
not limited to, mathematics and a 10-hour sequence 
of laboratory courses in the biological or 
physical sciences 20 

III. Social Sciences, including, but not limited to, 

history and American government 20 

IV. Courses appropriate to the major field of the 

individual student ^30 

. TOTAL . . .90 

In addition to the University System Core Curriculum requirements as 
outlined above, Armstrong State College requires six quarter hours in 
physical education as part of all baccalaureate degree programs. 

Armstrong State College Core Curriculum 

The student in any baccalaureate degree program at Armstrong State 
College must complete the following specific Core Curriculum require- 
ments. Consult the relevant departmental section for a complete state- 
ment of degree requirements for a specific program. Certain courses in the 
Core Curriculum may be exempt with credit awarded. See "Admission" 
section of this Bulletin. 

Quarter Hours 

Area I. Humanities 20 

English 111, 112, 211 

One of the following courses: 

Art 200, Art 271, Art 272, Art 273, Music 200, 
Philosophy 200, Philosophy 201, English 222 

Area II. Mathematics and the Natural Sciences 20 



Quarter Hours 

One of the following course sequences: 
Mathematics 101, 103 
Mathematics 101, 195 
Mathematics 101, 220 
Mathematics 101, 290 
One of the following course sequences: 
Biology 101, 102 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Physical Science 121, 122 

Area III. Social Sciences 20 

History 114, 115 
Political Science 113 
One course selected from: 
Psychology 101, Sociology 201 
Anthropology 201, Economics 201 

Area IV. Courses Appropriate to the Major Field 30 

Biology 
*Science and/or Mathematics electives (100-200 level) or 

Foreign Language 101, 102 10 

Chemistry 128, 129 K) 

Botany 203 5 

Zoology 204 5 

*Chemistry: 

Physics 213 5 

Chemistry 128, 129, 281 15 

Mathematics 104, 201 10 

Criminal Justice: 

History 251 or 252 5 

C.J. 100, 103, 201, 210 20 

Psychology 101 or Sociology 201 5 

Dental Hygiene Education: 

Associate degree required for admission to upper 
two-year curriculum. 
Early Elementary Education: 

Psychology 101 5 

Education 203 5 

Education 205 5 

Drama/Speech 228 5 

Five quarters hours to be selected from: 
Art 200, 271, 272, 273; Music 200; 

Philosophy 200, 201; English 222 5 

Five quarter hours to be selected from: 

Sociology 201 or Anthropology 201 5 

*Students seeking secondary certification will substitute Education 209 and Special Educa- 
tion 205. 
*In addition, a foreign language sequence is recommended. 

.•• > 



Quarter Hours 
English: 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 103, 201 20 

Electives from Art 200, 271, 272, 273; 

Music 200; Philosophy 200, 201; English 222 10 

History: 

Foreign Language 101, 102 10 

History 251, 252 10 

Electives to be chosen from: 

Anthropology 201, Economics 201, 

Geography 111, Mathematics 220, 

Psychology 101, Sociology 201, 

Social Work 250 , ..." 10 

Mathematical Sciences: 

Mathematics 104, 201, 202, 203 20 

Computer Science 110 5 

History 251 or 252 , 5 

Medical Technology: 

Physics 211, 212, 213 15 

Chemistry 128, 129, 281 15 

Middle School Education: 

Psychology 101 5 

Education 203 5 

Education 205 5 

Sociology 201 or Anthropology 201 5 

Five quarter hours to be selected from: 

Art 200, 271, 272, 273; Music 200; 

Philosophy 200, 201; English 222 5 

Five quarter hours to be selected from 

teaching content field 5 

* Music: 

Music Theory 111, 112, 113, 221, 212, 213 18 

Applied Music 140, 240 8 

Music 250 or Music 254 4 

Music Education: 

Psychology 101 5 

Education 203 5 

Elective from: Art 200, 271, 272; Music 200 5 

Fifteen quarter hours to be selected from: 

Music Theory 111, 112, 113, 211, 212, 213; 

Applied Music 140, 240 15 

Nursing: 

Biology 210 5 

Sociology 201 5 

BSN 200, 201, 404 15 

History 251 or 252 5 

*In addition, a foreign language sequence is recommended. 



Quartet Hours 

Physical Education: 

Drama/Speech 228 5 

Education 203 6 

P.E. 117, 207, 211, 228, 229 15 

Psychology 101 5 

Political Science: 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 or 

Computer Science 110, 231, 241 15 

History 251 or 252 5 

Electives to be chosen from: 

Anthropology 201, Criminal Justice 100, 

Economics 201, Geography 111, 

History 251 or 252, Psychology 101, 

Sociology 201, Social Work 250 10 

^Psychology: 

Mathematics 220 5 

Biology 101-102 10 

Anthropology 201 or 

Sociology 201 5 

Psychology 102 6 

History 251 or 252 

Social Work: 

Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 or 

Philosophy 201, Anthropology 201 and 

Social Science elective (100-200 level) 15 

Sociology 201 5 

History 252 5 

Social Work 250 5 

Area V. Physical Education Requirements (All Programs) f> 

P.E. 103 or 108 and P.E. 117 
Three of the following courses: 

P.E. 100, 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 109, 
200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 

TOTAL . . .96 

The student should complete all Core Curriculum requirements during 
his/her freshman and sophomore years. 



Regents' Examination 

The University System of Georgia requires that all students sue 
fully complete tests of writing skills and reading comprehension 
requirement for graduation. An individual holding a baccalaureate or 
higher degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher edlli 
will not be required to complete the Regents' Examination for a Becond 
degree. An individual who successfully completed the Regents' Kxamina- 

*In addition, a foreign language sequence is recommended. 



tion as part of an associate degree program will not be required to repeat 
the Examination as part of a subsequent baccalaureate degree program. 

Students may take the Examination upon completion of the required 
composition sequence in their degree programs (English 111, 112 for 
associate degrees; English 111, 112, 211 for baccalaureate degrees). Stu- 
dents must take the Examination in the quarter after their completion of 
U5 hours (exclusive of Physical Education activity courses) in their degree 
program. They will be notified to do so on their grade reports for the 
quarter in which the 45th hour has been completed. A student who ne- 
glects to take the Examination when first notified to do so will be prohibi- 
ted from pre-registering at the College for a subsequent quarter. They 
may, however, register at the regularly scheduled registration. Students 
who have not passed the Examination upon their completion of 75 hours 
(exclusive of Physical Education activity courses) in their degree program 
will be required to enroll in Regents' Examination remediation in each 
subsequent quarter until they have successfully completed the Examina- 
tion. Students who have not passed the Examination upon their comple- 
tion of 105 hours (exclusive of Physical Education activity courses) in 
their degree program will, in each subsequent quarter, be denied enroll- 
ment in credit courses and will be allowed to take only Regents' Examina- 
tion remediation until such time as they pass the Examination. Successful 
completion of the Regents' Examination is prerequisite to classification as 
a junior-year student. 

Transfer Students will be subject to the above requirements. Transfer 
students who are classified as juniors or seniors must take the Regents' 
Examination during their first quarter of attendance. If they do not pass 
the Examination, their subsequent enrollment in credit courses will be 
denied and they will be limited to Regents' Examination remediation until 
such time as they pass the Examination. 

The complete text of the policy for the Regents' Testing Program is 
printed as an appendix to this Bulletin. 

Exit Examinations 

Each student who receives a degree from Armstrong State College at 
the Associate or Baccalaureate degree level is required to take an Exit 
Examination in his/her major area. Each Exit Examination is designed to 
assess the mastery of concepts, principles, and knowledge expected of the 
student at the conclusion of major study. Please see the appropriate 
department head for further information concerning these examinations. 

Physical Education Program 

All students who are enrolled in baccalaureate degree programs for ten 
quarter hours or more on the day schedule are required to complete six 
hours of physical education which must include P.E. 117 (Basic Health) and 
P.E. 103 (Elementary Swimming) or P.E. 108 (Intermediate Swimming). 
Three additional courses are to be elected from any physical education 



activity courses with the last two numbers being 01 to 09. Any student who 
holds a valid senior life saving certificate and/or a valid water safety 
instructor certificate and/or passes the Armstrong swimming test may be 
exempted from P.E. 103 or P.E. 108. Physical education is not required of 
anyone who is beyond the age of 25 at the time of initial matriculation or of 
anyone enrolled primarily in evening classes. A student who has completed 
at least six months of military service is required to take only four hours of 
physical education, which may be chosen from all scheduled offerings. 

A student graduating with an Associate degree must complete three 
credit hours of Physical Education. 

The Department requires all students to make up excused absences; 
unexcused absences lower the final grade. 

Placement Tests in English and Mathematics 

The College reserves the right to place entering students in appropriate 
English and Mathematics courses. Diagnostic tests are administered for 
this purpose. Each student who has not otherwise met the prerequisite 
reuirement for Mathematics 101 (see departmental course listing) must 
the Mathematics Diagnostic Test before he may register for Mathematics 
101. Each student who has not otherwise met the prerequisite for English 
111, 110 or 191 must take the English Placement Test before he may 
register for these English courses. Scheduled dates for the administration 
of these tests are listed in the "Academic Calendar" section of this Bul- 
letin. 



State Requirements in History and Government 

By state law, each student who receives a diploma or certificate from a 
school supported by the State of Georgia must demonstrate proficiency in 
United States History and Government and in Georgia History and Gov- 
ernment. A student at Armstrong State College may demonstrate such 
proficiency by successfully completing examinations for which credit will 
be awarded. See "Academic Regulations" section of the Bulletin, or re- 
quest further information from the Head of the Department of History and 
Political Science. 



Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and the 
Bachelor of Science Degrees 

Requirements for each major program leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts with a major in English, History, Music, Political Science. Psychol- 
ogy, Social Work, or Economics, or to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
with a major in Biology, Chemistry, Criminal Justice, or Mathematical 
Sciences are described in the appropriate departmental listing. For the 
B. A. and B.S. degrees, a minimum of 185 quarter hours, exclusive of the 
required physical education courses, is required for graduation. 



Each student in one of these major programs must complete the 96-hour 
core curriculum requirement as listed above. 

The student will not be allowed to take senior division courses in his 
major field unless he has a minimum grade of "C" in all prerequisite courses 
in that field. No major program in a department will require more than 60 
quarter hours at all levels in the major field; however, the department may 
recommend up to 70 quarter hours. 

For its major program, a department will require from 15 to 30 quarter 
hours of specific courses or approved elective courses in related fields and 
may require language courses reaching the degree of proficiency specified 
by the department. Total requirements in the major and related fields, 
may not exceed 85 quarter hours. 

Each B. A. or B.S. degree program will include a minimum of 15 quarter 
hours of free elective s. 

Requirements for Associate Degrees 

Each associate degree program at Armstrong State College will include 
as part of its curriculum the following requirements: (1) English 111, 112; 
(2) History 251 or 252; (3) Political Science 113; (4) one course to be chosen 
from Areas I, II, or III of the Baccalaureate Core; (5) three credit hours of 
Physical Education. The student in an associate degree program is re- 
quired to complete successfully the Regents' Examination and to take an 
Exit Examination in his/her area of concentration. 



Additional Requirements for Degree Programs 

For specific course requirements and for curriculum outlines of specific 
degree programs, see departmental listings of course offerings and degree 
programs. 



VIII. Department of 
Special Studies 

Armstrong State College recognizes the need for a program of compen- 
satory education for students whose academic deficiencies might prevent 
their completing collegiate work successfully. The Department of Special 
Studies has been organized to provide that program. Institutional credit 
only is awarded for all courses numbered below 100 which are offered by 
the department. Institutional credit does not apply to the requirements for 
any degree program or graduation from the college. 

Courses in the Department of Special Studies receive students from the 
following four sources: 

1. A conditionally admitted student must enroll in those courses appro- 
priate to the removal of his specific areas of weakness as indicated by 
the results of the testing programs through which the student re- 
ceived conditional admittance status. To insure realistic class sche- 
duling, the conditionally admitted student can enroll only in cour 
approved by the head of the department until such time as the 
student achieves regular admission status. 

2. The Department of Languages and Literature and the Department of 
Mathematics and Computer Science may place any student, on the 
basis of the student's performance on the English Placement Test or 
the Mathematics Diagnostic Test, in appropriate Special Studies 
courses. 

3. Any student may be placed in any Special Studies courses on the 
basis of an unsatisfactory performance on the Regents Examination. 

4. Any student may voluntarily enroll in any Special Studies 
course. 

NOTICE: Veterans and others entitled to Veterans Administration Edu- 
cational Benefits may be certified only for a total of 45 credit hours in 
Special Studies courses. Only 15 hours may be attempted in each of the 
basic skills of English, Mathematics, and Reading. 

Faculty of the Department of Special Studies 

Professor John R. Hansen, Head; Associate Professor Brown; Assistant 
Professors Cottrell, Dandy, Harris, Padgett, and Summerville; Counselor 
Jarriel. 

Course Offerings 

ENGLISH 98— Basic Composition. (5-0-5). offered each quarter. 

This is the study and practice of sentence and paragraph writing. Stu- 
dents learn to write clear, correct sentences and to connect those sen- 
tences in order to produce developed, unified, and coherent paragraphs. 

ENGLISH 99— Intermediate Composition. (5-0-5). < offered each quar- 
ter. 



This is the study and practice of writing the short theme. Students learn 
organizational patterns and standard American usage. 

MATHEMATICS 98-Arithmetic and Elementary Algebra. (5-0-5). 
Offered each quarter. 

Review of arithmetic. Introduction to negative integers and elementary 
algebra, including simple polynomials and equations. 

MATHEMATICS 99 -Intermediate Algebra. (5-0-5). Offered each 
quarter. Prerequisite: A student must have attained one of the following 
prior to enrolling — (1) a score of at least 10 on the Mathematics Diagnostic 
Test (dates for this test appear in the Academic Calendar in this Bulletin) 
or (2) a grade of P in Mathematics 98. 

Rational expressions; factoring of polynomials; linear and quadratic 
equations; graphs of linear functions; rational exponents; radicals. 

READING 98— Reading Skills. (5-0-5). Offered each quarter. Not open 
to students having credit for Reading 99. 

This course is appropriate for conditionally admitted students and other 
students experiencing serious difficulty in reading. Word attack skills, 
comprehensive skills, and vocabulary building are stressed. 

READING 99— Developing Reading Maturity. (5-0-5). Offered on de- 
mand. 

This course is appropriate for students preparing for the Regents Exam- 
ination and for students experiencing moderate difficulty in reading. Com- 
prehension skills, vocabulary enrichment, test-taking strategies, and 
reading fluency are stressed. 

STUDY TECHNIQUES 99-Effective Study Techniques. (1-2-2). Of- 
fered on demand. 

This course is designed to develop systematic and efficient study habits 
for academic success. Special emphasis will be placed on time manage- 
ment, listening skills, memory techniques, reading flexibility, note-taking 
systems, textbook mastery, and test-taking strategies. 



IX. School of Arts and 
Sciences 

Robert A. Burnett, Dean 

The School of Arts and Sciences provides, by virtue of its professional 
staff, scholarly resources and physical facilities, the opportunity for quali- 
fied students to obtain the best possible education attainable within the 
structure of a liberal baccalaureate program or through curricula leading 
to a specialized degree. The goals of the school are: 

To acquaint all students, by means of a core curriculum in the liberal arts 
and sciences, with the diversity of the intellectual and cultural achieve- 
ments of man; 

To assist them in developing the skills necessary to think and to express 
themselves clearly and creatively; 

To enable them to understand and assume their responsibilities as free 
men and women in a democratic society; 

To provide a liberal baccalaureate education, supported by sound in- 
struction, scholarly resources, and a commitment of free inquiry. 

The School of Arts and Sciences includes the Departments of Biology, 
Chemistry and Physics, Fine Arts, History and Political Science, Lan- 
guages and Literature, Mathematics and Computer Science, and Psychol- 
ogy. The following degree programs are offered by those departments: 

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in English 

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in History 

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Music 

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Political Science 

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Psychology 

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Biology 

Bachelor of Science with a Major in Chemistry 

Bachelor of Science with a Major in the Mathematical Sciences (choice of 
concentrations in Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Computer Sci- 
ence, Mathematics Education) 

Associate in Arts (General) 

The departments in the School of Arts and Sciences cooperate with 
departments in the Schools of Education and Human Services in the 
offering of professionally oriented programs leading to baccalaureate or 
specialized degrees: 

Bachelor of Music Education 

Bachelor of Science in Art Education 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 

Teacher Certification programs in English, History, Music. Political 
Science, Psychology (Behavioral Science), Biology. Chemistry. Math- 
ematics. NOTE: ADDITIONAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 
SUPPLEMENTARY TO THOSE LISTED IN THIS SECTION 
ARE OUTLINED IN THE SCHOOL OK EDUCATION SECTION 
OF THIS BULLETIN. 



A student may combine with a major field of study one of the following 
minor concentrations offered by departments within the School of Arts and 
Sciences: 

American Civilization Mental Health 

Art Museum/Preservation Studies 

Botany Music 

Chemistry Philosophy 

Computer Science Physical Science 

Drama/Speech Physics 

English Political Science 

Foreign Language Psychology 

History Russian Studies 

Journalism Zoology 

Linguistics 

Program for the Degree 

Associate in Arts* 

(General) 

For the two-year degree of Associate in Arts, a student must complete at least 45 
quarter hours of course-work in this program at Armstrong State College. The 
program is designed to provide a substantial liberal education as a base for upper- 
division specialization. 

Quarter Hours 

1. English 111, 112, 211, and one course selected from: 20 

Art 200, 271, 272, 273; Music 200; 
Philosophy 200, 201; English 222 

2. History 114 or 115 and History 251 or 252 10 

3. One of the following two-course sequences: 10 

Biology 101, 102 
Chemistry 128, 129 
Chemistry 121, 122 
Physics 211, 212 
Physics 217, 218 
Physical Science 121, 122 

4. Mathematics 101 and 103 or 195 or 220 or 290 10 

5. Political Science 113 and one of the following courses: 10 

Anthropology 201, Economics 201, 
Psychology 101, Sociology 201 

6. Physical Education 3 

P.E. 103 or 108 and two activity courses 

7. Concentration and/or Electives 30 

The concentration may be specified by a department 
from appropriate courses. If not, the student may 
select courses which are open to him.** 

8. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 93 



'Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission" 
section of this Bulletin. 

'If a student plans to continue work at a later date in a baccalaureate degree curriculum, he 
should select courses that will meet the listed requirements for that degree program. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Professor Leslie B. Davenport, Jr., Head: Professor Thorne; Associate 
Professors Guillou and Pingel; Assistant Professors Beumerand Brower; 

Instructor Restivo; Teaching Associate Dixon. 

The Major in Biology 

The major in biology consists of Biology 101, 102, Botany 203, Zoology 

204, and at least 40 quarter hours credit in biology courses (botany, 
zoology, etc.) numbered 300 or above. The majority of the courses in the 
major numbered 300 or above must betaken in the Biology Department at 
Armstrong State College. 

In addition, biology majors must complete elementary Statistics and the 
course sequence in organic chemistry (15 quarter hours). The course in 
general college physics (15 quarter hours) is strongly recommended and 
should be considered essential for those who expect to continue the study 
of biology beyond the B.S. degree. 

Each student acquiring a major in biology must include in his program 
the following courses: Biology 370; Biology 480; Botany 410 or Zoology 410; 
one course in botany numbered 300 or above, other than Botany 410; and 
one course in zoology numbered 300 or above, other than Zoology 410. If 
credit for any of the first three required units is transferred to Armstrong 
from another college, the department may require that it be validated by 
examination. 

To be admitted to courses in biology above the freshman level (those 
numbered 200 or above), the student must have completed the prerequi- 
sites for each with at least a grade of "C" for each prerequisite. To be 
eligible for a B.S. degree in biology, the student must have a grade of at 
least "C" for all upper division courses (those numbered 300 or above) in 
biology. 

Beginning students who have successfully completed strong courses in 
biology in high school are advised to take examinations for advanced 
placement or for credit for Biology 101 and/or Biology 102. Arrangements 
to take these examinations may be made with the head of the department. 

In order to receive Core Curriculum credits for the biology laboratory 
science sequence by taking biology in the Savannah State-Armstrong 
exchange program, a student must take the ENTIRE sequence often 
quarter hours either at Armstrong State College or at Savannah St 
College. 

Students majoring in biology may concurrently complete all pre-medical 
and/or pre-dental requirements and all requirements for secondary teach- 
ing certification in science (biology). The Biology Department co-ordinal 
the program in Medical Technology. 

Students majoring in biology and/or pursuing a pre-professional pro- 
gram should work closely with an assigned departmental advisor in plan- 
ning their undergraduate programs. 



Program for the Degree 
Bachelor of Science with a Major in Biology 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* 75 

1. English 111, 112, 211 and one course selected from: 20 

English 222; Art 200, 271, 272, 273; 
Music 200; Philosophy 200, 201 

2. History 114, 115 10 

3. History 251 or 252 5 

4. Political Science 113 5 

5. One of the following: 5 

Economics 201; Psychology 101; 
Sociology 201 

6. Mathematics 101 (or 103 or 104 if placement 

examination allows) and 220 10 

7. Biology 101, 102; Botany 203**, Zoology 204** 20 

B. Courses in Major Field 40 

Biology 370, 480 10 

Botany 410 or Zoology 410 ■ . . 5 

Additional Courses (junior-senior level) 25 

C. Related Fields 25 

Chemistry 128, 129 10 

Chemistry 341, 342, 343 15 

D. Electives 45 

(Selected from Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural 
Sciences, Education. Physics 211, 212, 213 and a 
foreign language sequence are strongly recommended.) 

E. Physical Education 6 

Physical Education 117 and 103 or 108 3 

Physical Education Activities Courses 3 

F. Regents and Exit Examinations . 

TOTAL 191 

The student completing the major in Biology may concurrently complete 
secondary teaching certification requirements by completing the following 
program of studies. 

Program for Secondary School Teachers of Science 
with a Major in Biology 

Quarter Hours 
A. General Requirments* 75 

1. English 111, 112, 211 and one course selected from: 20 

Art 200, 271, 272, 273; Music 200; 
Philosophy 200, 201; English 222 

2. History 114, 115 10 

3. History 251 or 252 5 

4. Psychology 101 and one of the following courses: 10 

Economics 101 
Political Science 113 
Sociology 201 

5. Mathematics 101 (or 103 or 104, if placement 

examination allows); 220 10 

*Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admissions" 
section of this Bulletin. 
**Should be completed before beginning upper division courses. 



Quarter Hours 

6. The following courses: 20 

Biology 101, 102 

Botany 203 and Zoology 204 

B. Courses in Major Field in 

Students must complete the requirements for a major 
including Biology 370, 480; Botany 410 or Zoology 410 

C. Courses in Other Sciences in 

Chemistry 128, 129, 341, 342, 343 25 

Physics 211 (Mathematics 103 is prerequisite); 212, 213 L5 

D. Physical Education 6 

Physical Education 103, 117 3 

Three courses selected from: :-; 

P.E. 101, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 200, 

201, 202, 203, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209 

E. Professional Sequence 10 

Education 203, 330, 444, 446, 447, 448 30 

Psychology 301; Special Education 205 L0 

F. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 201 

The Department also supervises the degree program in Medical Tech- 
nology, requirements of which follow. 

Program for Degree 
Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology* 

QuarU r Hours 

1. English 111, 112, 211, and one course selected from: 20 

Art 200, 271, 272, 273; Music 200; 
Philosophy 200, 201; English 222 

2. History 251 or 252 5 

3. Political Science 113 5 

4. History 114, 115 10 

5. Mathematics 101 (or 103 or 104, if placement 

examination allows); 220 1 < » 

6. Psychology 101 or Sociology 201 5 

7. Physics 211 (Mathematis 103 is prerequisite); 212; 213 15 

8. Chemistry 128-129, 281, 341, 342, 343, and 380 

9. Biology 101-102, Zoology 204, 356, 

Biology 351, 370, and Zoology 372 

10. Physical Education 6 

11. Internship in Clinical Medical Technology MS 

12 Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



Minor Concentrations 

The following minor concentrations are available in the Department of 
Biology. For completion of each of the minors, the student must earn 
grades of "C" or better in each course offered for the minor. 

The minor in Botany requires a total of 25 hours: Biology 101, 102; 
Botany 203 and two courses selected from Botany 305, 323, 125. 

*Certain courses may be exempted with credit awarded. See "Admission" Bection of this 
Bulletin. 



The minor in Zoology requires a total of 25 hours: Biology 101, 102; 
Zoology 204 and two courses selected from Zoology 325, 355, 356, 372, 425, 
and Entomology 301. 

Course Offerings 
Biology 

BIOLOGY 101-PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY. (4-3-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: none. 

Structure and function of cells; biological chemistry; structure, function, 
and development of flowering plants. 

BIOLOGY 102-PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY. (4-3-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Biology 101. 

Structure, function, and development of vertebrate animals; genetics; 
ecology; evolution. 

BIOLOGY/PHYSICS 205-RADIATION BIOLOGY. (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: Physics 213 or 218 or 202, and a two-quarter sequence in 
anatomy and physiology or general biology. 

Sources, propagation, and interactions of ionizing radiation and its bio- 
logical effect. (Credit may not be applied toward a major in biology or in 
chemistry.) 

BIOLOGY 210-MICRO-ORGANISMS AND DISEASE. (4-3-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: Chemistry 201 or 122 and Zoology 209. 
An introduction to the study of microorganisms with primary emphasis 

on bacteria. The morphology, life history, and importance to public health 

of representative bacteria, fungi, viruses, and protozoa are considered. 

Credit for this course may not be applied toward a major in biology. 

BIOLOGY 310-MAN AND THE ENVIRONMENT. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Completion of 75 quarter hours credit in college courses. 
Consideration of the interactions between humans and the support 

systems of the earth which are essential to their existence. Credit for this 

course may not be applied toward a major in biology. 

BIOLOGY 351 -BACTERIOLOGY. (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: 10 hours of biological science, Chemistry 128-129. 
A survey of micro-organisms with special emphasis on bacteria and their 

relationships to man. 

BIOLOGY 352-MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY. (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Biology 351 and permission of the instructor. 
A comprehensive study of the disease-causing microbes in terms of their 

diagnosis, pathology, and epidemiology. 

BIOLOGY 354-MORPHOLOGIC HAEMATOLOGY. (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: Biology 102 and Chemistry 129. 

Cytology of normal and pathologic human blood and bone marrow with 
emphasis upon antigenic determination in blood banking. 



BIOLOGY 358-HISTOLOGICALTKCHNiyrK. (0-1! 

Winter. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102. 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, stain- 
ing, and mounting plant and animal materials for study. 

BIOLOGY 370-GENETICS. 
Winter. Prerequisites: Biology 101, 102; Chemistry 128, 129; Biology 

351 and junior status recommended. 

An introduction to the principles of biological inheritance. 

BIOLOGY 410-CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY. 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: At least third quarter junior status; 
two courses in biology numbered 300 or above; and organic chemistry. 

A consideration of the functional relationships between microscopic 
anatomy and cell chemistry, emphasizing permeability, metabolism, and 
growth. 

BIOLOGY 440-CYTOLOGY. (2-6-5) 

Summer. Prerequisite: Two courses in biology numbered 800 or abovi . 
The study of cells, their cytoplasm and nuclei, growth, differentiation, 

and reproduction. 

BIOLOGY 450-EVOLUTION. (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Major in biology (at trust 15 qtr. hrs. credit in 

biology courses numbered 300 or above). 
Modern concepts in organic evolution. 

BIOLOGY 480-GENERAL ECOLOGY. 1-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: Tiro courses in biology numberedSOO orabovi . 
A survey of the principles of ecology and their application to the welfare 

of humans, co-ordinated with a study of populations and communities in 

the field. 

BIOLOGY 490-PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGY. (1-5 hours credit I 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: At least 20 hours credit in biology 
courses numbered 300 or above; a B average in biology courses and 
overall work: consent of department head: agreement oj a staff rm mber to 
supervise work. 

Problems to be assigned and work directed by a member oft he depart- 
ment. Supervised research including literature search, field and/or labora- 
tory investigation, and presentation of an acceptable, written report of 
results. Credit will depend upon the work to be done. Both credit and 
proposed work must be approved in advance, in writing, by the faculty 
member to supervise the work and by the department head. 

Botany 

BOTANY 203-SURVEY OF THE PLANT KINGDOM. 
Spring, Fall. Prerequisites: Biology 101 and 102. 

Morphology and phylogeny of the division- of the plant kingdom, with 
emphasis upon the evolution of the land flora. 



BOTANY 305-IDENTIFICATION OF 

FLOWERING PLANTS. (0-10-5). 

Spring. Prerequisite or corequisite: Botany 203. 

Studies in the identification of plants with emphasis on local flora. 

BOTANY 323-PLANT ANATOMY. (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Botany 203. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems of vascular 
plants, and a comparative study of the structure of roots, stems, leaves, 
flowers, and fruits. 

BOTANY 410-PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: Botany 203 and Organic Chemistry. 
A survey of physiologic processes occurring in plants and the conditions 

which affect these processes. 

BOTANY 425-PLANT MORPHOLOGY. (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Botany 323. 

Comparative studies of vascular plants with emphasis on form, struc- 
ture, reproduction, and evolutionary relationships. 

Entomology 

ENTOMOLOGY 301 -INTRODUCTORY ENTOMOLOGY. (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequsite: Zoology 20Jf. 

An introduction to the study of insects — their structure, identification, 
and biology. 

Zoology 

ZOOLOGY 204-SURVEY OF THE ANIMAL KINGDOM. (3-4-5) 
Winter, Summer. Prerequisites: Biology 101 and 102. 
An evolutionary survey of the major animal phyla. 

ZOOLOGY 208-HUMAN ANATOMY AND 

PHYSIOLOGY I. (3-4-5) 

A basic course considering the gross anatomy, histology, and physiology 
of the human organ systems. Intended primarily for majors in nursing and 
dental hygiene; credit for this course may not be applied toward a major in 
biology. 

ZOOLOGY 209-HUMAN ANATOMY AND 

PHYSIOLOGY II. (3-4-5) 

Prerequisites: Zoology 208 and Chemistry 201 or 122. 

A continuation of the basic course considering the anatomy and physiol- 
ogy of the human. Credit may not be applied toward a major in biology. 

ZOOLOGY 210-FUNCTIONAL HUMAN ANATOMY 

FOR MEDICAL RADIOGRAPHER. (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Zoology 208. 

Detailed skeletal anatomy; gross systemic anatomy and histology, with 
functional highlights of circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and 
reproductive systems. 



ZOOLOGY 211-CARDIOPULMONARY 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Zoology 209. 

The cardiopulmonary system is studied with special emphasis on func- 
tional anatomy. The physiology of the heartbeat, the control of circulation, 
respiration, and blood pressure, and partial movement across membranes 
will also be studied. 

ZOOLOGY 325-ADVANCED INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. (3 I 5) 
Spring. Prerequisite: Zoology 204. 

A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and natural 
history of the major invertebrate groups. 

ZOOLOGY 355— EMBRYOLOGY. 

Fall. Prerequisites: Zoology 204 or equivalent in am, the- biological 

science. 

An elementary course in embryology in which the chick is used to 
illustrate the basic principles of developmental anatomy. 

ZOOLOGY 356-COMPARATIVE ANATOMY 
OF THE VERTEBRATES. 

Winter. Prerequisite: Zoology 204. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the 
vertebrates. 

ZOOLOGY 357-ANIMAL HISTOLOGY. 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Zoology 204. 

A study of the tissues and their organization into organs and organ 
systems in animals. 

ZOOLOGY 372-PARASITOLOGY. (3- 

Fall. Prerequisite: Zoology 204. 

A comparative study of the internal and external parasites of man and 
other animals. 

ZOOLOGY 410-GENERAL VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY. (3 
Fall. Prerequisites: Zoology 204 and Organic Chemistry. 
An introduction to the general physiologic processes of the vertebrates. 

ZOOLOGY 425-MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. (2 I 

Summer. Prerequisite: Zoology 325, or permission of instructor and 

depaiiment head. 

Studies in the identification and ecologic distribution of marine inverte- 
brates as exemplified by collection from the southeastern coastal region. 

ZOOLOGY 429-ENDOCRINOLOGY. 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Zoology \10 and one otiu rcow 
biology numbered 800 or a hue, . 

Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metabolism and 
reproductive cycles. 



ZOOLOGY 435-COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Zoology 204 and Organic Chemis- 
try. 

Studies in various groups of animals of the functions of organ systems 
involved in the maintenance of homeostasis under varying conditions 
within normal habitats and of in vitro reactions of tissues and systems 
under laboratory conditions. 

Marine Science Center 

The following courses are offered at the Marine Science Center on 
Skidaway Island. Five quarter hours of credit from these courses may be 
applied within the major in biology. All credits from these courses may be 
applied as electives toward the B.S. degree in biology. These courses at 
the Marine Science Center are co-operatively sponsored by Armstrong 
State College, Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia State University, 
Georgia Southern College, and the University of Georgia. 

BIOLOGY 430-ESTUARINE ECOLOGY. (6-6-5) 

Summer (five weeks). Prerequisites: Chemistry 128, 129; Zoology 201*; 
two courses in biology numbered 300 or above; or permission of instructor. 
Math 104 recommended. 

The evolution and development of estuaries, substrates, physical pro- 
cesses, communities, ecosystem functions, ecosystem dynamics and anal- 
ysis. The study area will include the estuarine complex of the Carolinian 
province as exemplified along the coast of Georgia. 

ZOOLOGY 405-ICHTHYOLOGY. (6-6-5) 

Summer (five weeks). Prerequisites: Zoology 204 and one course in 

zoology numbered 300 or above, or permission of instructor. 

The taxonomy, distribution, ecology, and evolution of fishes with special 

reference to the fishes of eastern North America. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 

Professor Henry E. Harris, Head; Professors Brewer, Robbins, and 
Stratton; Associate Professor Whiten; Assistant Professor Pestel; In- 
structor Jaynes; Temporary Instructor Goette. 

The department offers one degree program, the Bachelor of Science 
with a major in chemistry, designed to give depth in the fields of chemis- 
try, yet flexible enough to accommodate a range of career goals. Students 
majoring in chemistry may concurrently complete all pre-medical and/or 
pre-dental requirements and all requirements for secondary teaching cer- 
tification in science (chemistry). The department also participates in the 
Dual Degree Program of Armstrong State College and the Georgia Insti- 
tute of Technology under which students may earn simultaneously the 
B.S. degree in chemistry from Armstrong and the Bachelor's degree from 
Georgia Tech in a related field, such as chemical engineering. Students 
interested in learning more about the chemistry degree program or any 



course offered by the department should contact the department head. 
Any student who plans to pursue a degree in chemistry should contact the 
department head as early as possible for advisement and academic plan- 
ning. 

Program for the Degree 
Bachelor of Science with a Major in Chemistry 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* <;i 

1. English 111, 112, 211 15 

2. One of the following: 5 

Art 200, 271, 272, 273; English 222; 
Music 200; Philosophy 200, 201 

3. Mathematics 101, 103 10 

4. History 114, 115 and either History 251 or 252 15 

5. Political Science 113 5 

6. One of the following courses: 5 

Psychology 101, Anthropology 201, 
Sociology 201, Economics 201 

7. Physical Education 103 or 108, 117, and 

three activities courses 6 

B. Major Field Requirements 60 

1. Chemistry 128, 129, 281, 341, 342, 343, 380, 491, 492, 493 47 

2. Approved electives from: 13 

Chemistry 421, 441, 448, 461, 462, 480, 497, 498, 499 

C. Related Field Requirements 30 

1. Physics 211, 212, 213 or 

Physics 217, 218, 219 15 

2. Mathematics 104 5 

3. Approved electives 10 

D. Approved General Electives 40 

Electives chosen to meet specific educational goals 

E. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

Program for Secondary School Teachers 
of Science with a Major in Chemistry 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* 61 

1. English 111, 112, 211 15 

2. One of the following: 5 

Art 200, 271, 272, 273; English 222; 
Music 200, Philosophy 200, 201 

3. Mathematics 101, 103 10 

4. History 114, 115 and either 251 or 252 15 

5. Political Science 113 5 

6. Psychology 101 5 

7. Physical Education 103 or 108, 117, and 

three activities courses 6 

B. Major Field Requirements 60 

1. Chemistry 128, 129, 281, 380, 341. 342, 343, 491, 492, 490 47 

2. Approved 300-400 level chemistry electives 13 



•Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admissions*' 
section of the Bulletin. 

oi 



Quarter Hours 

C. Related Field Requirements 30 

1. Biology 101, 102 10 

2. Physics 211, 212, 213 or 

Physics 217, 218, 219 15 

3. Mathematics 104 5 

D. Professional Sequence 40 

1. Education 203, 330, 444, 446, 447, 448 30 

2. Psychology 301; Special Education 205 10 

E. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

Minor Concentrations 

The department offers the following minor concentrations. Students 
majoring in chemistry may not seek a minor in chemistry or physical 
science. 

The minor in Chemistry requires twenty credit hours with grades of "C" 
or better in upper division chemistry courses chosen from the following: 
Chemistry 341, 342, 343, 380, 421, 431, 461, 491, 492, 493. 

The minor in Physics requires twenty-three credit hours from courses 
designated as physics with a grade of "C" or better in each course. 

The minor in Physical Science requires ten credit hours of a laboratory 
sequence in chemistry, physical science, or physics plus fifteen credit 
hours chosen from: Astronomy 301, Chemistry 301, Geology 301, Oceano- 
graphy 301, Meterology 301. A grade of "C" or better is required in each 
course. 

Course Offerings 

Chemistry 

CHEMISTRY 121, 122-GENERAL 

CHEMISTRY. (4-3-5 for each course) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 101. (Credit in these courses 
may not be applied to a major in chemistry.) 

These courses include a study of the fundamental laws and theories of 
inorganic chemistry, a survey of organic chemistry, and an introduction to 
biochemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 128-129-GENERAL CHEMISTRY (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: College Algebra or concurrently. Offered each quarter. 
These courses are the first two of the series 128, 129, 281 required to 
complete an academic year of General Chemistry. A study of the funda- 
mental principles and laws of chemistry with a quantitative approach to 
the subject. These courses are designed for the science, pre-medical and 
engineering student. The laboratory work includes an understanding of 
fundamental techniques. 



CHEMISTRY 201 -ESSENTIALS OF 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY. 0-5) 

Offered each quarti r. 

An introduction to inorganic, organic, and biochemistry with emphasis 
on applications in human physiology and clinical chemistry. Experimental 
principles will be illustrated with classroom demonstrations. 

CHEMISTRY 202-PHYSICAL PRINCIPLES. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 201. 

This course 1 provides a study of the physical principles ofgas behavior, 
acid-base calculations, weak acid ionization, buffer solutions, pH measure- 
ments, blood gas measurements, and other subjects of special interest to 
persons in allied health science.-. 

CHEMISTRY 281 -QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 128. Fall and S/>rm(/. 

This course is the third of the series 128, 129, 281 required to complete an 

academic year of General Chemistry. Study of ionic equilibria and separa- 
tion methods. Homogeneous solutions involving dissociation, hydrolysis 
and buffer action, and heterogeneous systems showing the influence of pH 
and complexation of solubility are illustrated. Various chemical and chro- 
matographic techniques are used as a basis for qualitative analysis. 

CHEMISTRY 301-THE CHEMISTRY OF LIFE. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of laboratory s<- /<■/><■< completed. Of- 
fered o)i demand. 

An introductory course covering selected areas of applied biochemistry. 
This course is not recommended for chemistry, biology, or premedical 
students. 

CHEMISTRY 341-342 -ORGANIC 

CHEMISTRY. (4-3-5 for each cour 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 129. Fall, Winter. 

These courses include the study of aliphatics. aromatic hydrocarbons 
and their derivatives, polyfunctional compounds, and polynuclear hydro- 
carbons. Organic reactions are emphasized in terms of modern theory. 

CHEMISTRY 343-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. Spring. 

A continuation of the organic chemistry sequence •"» 11 . 342. This course 
completes the fundamental study of organic chemistry with a consider- 
ation of carbohydrates, amino acids, and heterocyclics with their related 
compounds. 

CHEMISTRY 350-CHEMICAL LITERATURE. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry SU2. Offered on demand. 

A study of the use of the chemical library and the important journals. 
references, and information sour- 



CHEMISTRY 380-QUANTITATIVE INSTRUMENTAL 
ANALYSIS. , (2-9-5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 281. Winter, Summer. 

A study of the principles of gravimetric, volumetric, spectrophotome- 
try, and electrometric methods of analysis. The laboratory will provide 
practice in techniques and application of these principles. 

CHEMISTRY 397-SCIENTIFIC GLASS-BLOWING. (0-4-2) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. Offered on demand. 
Properties of glass for scientific apparatus; introduction of glass working 

equipment; planning of sequential joining operations; demonstration of 

major techniques for joining and working glass; supervision of individual 

students in preparing test-pieces. 

CHEMISTRY 421 -ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. (3-3-4) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 380. Offered on demand. 

Selected topics in inorganic chemistry tending to increase students' 
understanding of mechanisms of chemical reactions. Emphasizes the peri- 
odicity of elements. 

CHEMISTRY 431-432-SEMINAR. (3-0-3 for each course) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 31*3. Offered on demand. 
Selected topics for group discussion. 

CHEMISTRY 441 -ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 3J>3. Fall. 

A further study of important organic reactions emphasizing theories of 
reaction mechanisms of organic chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 448-ORGANIC QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. (2-9-5) 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 34,3. Offered on demand. 
Systematic approach to the identification of organic compounds. 

CHEMISTRY 451-HISTORY OF CHEMISTRY. (5-0-5) 

Spring, odd years. Prerequisites: Junior standing and Chemistry 129. 
The development of science surveyed from antiquity to the present. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of ideas, men who made significant 
contributions, evolution of chemical theories, and the modern social impli- 
cations of science. 

CHEMISTRY 461-BIOCHEMISTRY. (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 3J+3. Offered on demand. 

A study of the chemical nature of cellular constituents and cellular 
metabolism. Subject topics include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, enzy- 
mes, vitamins and coenzymes, anaerobic carbohydrate metabolism, lipid 
metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and 
photosynthesis. 

CHEMISTRY 462-BIOCHEMISTRY. (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry J>61. Offered on demand. 

A study of the metabolism of ammonia and nitrogen-containing com- 
pounds, the biosynthesis of nucleic acids and proteins, metabolic regula- 
tion, and selected topics. 



CHEMISTRY 463-CLINICAL CHEMISTRY. (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 3^3. Offered on demand. 

A study of the principles of chemistry applied in the clinical laboratory. 
Topics subjects to include instrumentation and microtechniques. 

CHEMISTRY 480-ADVANCED INSTRUMENTAL 

ANALYSIS. (2-9-6) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 380, 3^2. Offered on demand. 

Includes study of principles involved in the operation and the laboratory 
use of special instruments for analysis. 

CHEMISTRY 491-492-493-PHYSICAL 

CHEMISTRY. (3-3-4 for each cour 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 380, Physics 213, Mathematics 104. Winter, 
Spring. 

Fundamental principles of physical chemistry including the study of 
solids, liquids, gases, thermochemistry, thermodynamics and solutions. 
These courses will also cover a study of chemical equilibria, chemical 
kinetics, electrochemistry, colloids, quantum mechanics and nuclear 
chemistry. 

CHEMISTRY 497-498-499 -INDEPENDENT 

STUDY. (1-5 hours credit each course) 

Prerequisite: Consent of the Head of the Department. Offered each 
quarter. 

Designed to permit qualified students to pursue supervised individual 
research or study. Emphasis will be placed on the literature search, 
laboratory experimentation, and presentation of an acceptable written 
report. Both the credit and proposed work must be approved in writing by 
the faculty member who will supervise the work and by the department 
head. Open to transient students only with the permission of the Dean of 
the Faculty at Armstrong and of the college from which the student comes. 

CHEMISTRY 496-INTERNSHIP. (Credit variable to \2 hours) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: Chemistry $4$, 880 and 
permission of the Department Head. 

The student will pursue a meaningful project in industry, government or 
other institutional setting. The project will be determined, supervised, 
and evaluated by the sponsor of the activity and the student's faculty 
adviser. Application and arrangement must be made through the depart- 
ment by mid-quarter preceding the quarter of internship. Open to tran- 
sient students only with permission of the Dean of the Faculty at Ann- 
strong and the appropriate official of the school from which the student 
comes. 

Marine Science Center 

The following course is offered at the Marine Science Center on Skida- 
way Island. The course is cooperatively sponsored by Armstrong State 
College, Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia State University, Geor- 
gia Southern College and the University of Georgia. 



OCEANOGRAPHY 430-APPLIED OCEANOGRAPHY. (6-4-5) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 128, 129; Biology 101, 102. Offered Summer 
Quarter. 

The aspects of physical, chemical, and biological sciences which are 
marine oriented as applied to specific problems in the ocean and its envi- 
rons. Collection and interpretation of field data stressed, utilizing vessels 
and equipment of the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography. 

Physical Science 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 121-PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT. (4-3-5) 
Prerequisite: admission requirements. Offered each quarter. 
An elementary study of the fundamental laws and concepts of physics 

and astronomy. This course is designed for non-science majors interested 

in a descriptive survey. The laboratory study is designed to supplement 

the study of theory. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 122-PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT. (4-3-5) 
Prerequisite: admission requirements. Offered each quarter. 
An elementary study of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry 
and geology. This is a descriptive course which includes the classifiction of 
elements, basic chemical reactions, and atomic structure designed for the 
non-science major. The laboratory study includes experiences which aug- 
ment class discussion. 

ASTRONOMY 301-INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of laboratory science completed. Of- 
fered on demand. 

A study of the planetary system, stars, stellar structure, and cosmol- 
ogy. 

GEOLOGY 301-PRINCIPLES OF GEOLOGY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory science completed. 

Offered on demand. 

An introduction of physical and historical geology. A study of the origin, 

evolution, and structure of the earth's crust, and geologic history. 

METEROLOGY 301-PRINCIPLES OF METEROLOGY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Ten quarter hours of laboratory science completed. Of- 
fered on demand. 

An introduction to the description of the state of the atmosphere and to 
the physical laws that describe atmospheric phenomena. 

OCEANOGRAPHY 301-PRINCIPLES OF 

OCEANOGRAPHY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Ten quarter hours of a laboratory science completed. 
Offered on demand. 

A study of the basic principles of oceanography. Topic subjects to 
include the distribution of water over the earth, nature and relief of the 
ocean floors, tides and currents, chemical properties of sea water and 
constituents, and applications of oceanographic research. 



Physics 

PHYSICS 201, 202-RADIATION PHYSICS. (3-2-4 for each course) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 101. 

These courses deal with the basic concepts involved in production, 
propagation, and detection of electromagnetic radiation. Particular em- 
phasis will be given to mechanisms describing the interaction of X-Rays 
with matter, radiation protection, photographic detection, dosimetry, and 
circuitry. 

PHYSICS/BIOLOGY 205 -RADIATION BIOLOGY. (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: Physics 213 or 218 or 202, and two quarter sequence in 

anatomy and physiology or general biology. 

Sources, propagation, and interactions of ionizing radiation and its bio- 
logical effects. (Credit may not be applied toward a major in biology or in 
chemistry.) 

PHYSICS 211-MECHANICS. (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 103. Fall. 

The first part of the sequence Physics 211-212-213 in general physics. 
Basic classical physics, including mechanics, sound, and heat. Designed for 
students with aptitude in mathematics below the level of calculus. Selected 
experiments to demonstrate applications. 

PHYSICS 212-ELECTRICITY, MAGNETISM, 

BASIC LIGHT. (4-2 5 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 103 and Physics 211. Winter. 
The second part of the sequence Physics 211-212-213. Basic electricity, 
magnetism, and geometrical optics. 

PHYSICS 213-LIGHT PHENOMENA, MODERN PHYSICS. (4-2 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 103 and Physics 212. Sprint/. 

The last part of the sequence Physics 211-212-213. Continues the study 
of light from the viewpoint of physical optics, and concludes with the study 
of atomic and nuclear physics. Laboratory work includes two selected 
experiments of advanced scope. 

PHYSICS 217-MECHANICS. (5-3-6) 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 104. or concurrently. Fall. 
The first part of the sequence Physics 217-218-219 in general physics. 

Basic classical physics, including mechanics, sound and heat. Designed 

especially for engineering students and recommended for science majors. 

Selected experiments to demonstrate applications. 

PHYSICS 218-ELECTRICITY, MAGNETISM, 

BASIC LIGHT. (5 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 104 and Physics 217. Winter. 

The second part of the sequence Physics 217-218-219. Basic electricity, 

magnetism, and geometrical optics. 



PHYSICS 219-LIGHT PHENOMENA, MODERN PHYSICS. (5-3-6) 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 10 % and Physics 218. Spring. 
The last part of the sequence Physics 217-218-219. Continues the study 

of light from the viewpoint of physical optics, and concludes with the study 

of atomic and nuclear physics. Laboratory work includes two selected 

experiments of advanced scope. 

PHYSICS 380-INTRODUCTORY QUANTUM 

MECHANICS. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Physics 213 or Physics 21 9 and Mathematics 201 . Offered 
on demand. 

An introduction to quantum mechanical principles with applications in 
atomic and molecular structure. 

PHYSICS 412-ELECTRONIC MEASUREMENTS 

FOR SCIENTISTS. (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Physics 212 or Physics 218. 

Circuit theory and digital/analog electronics dealing with measure- 
ments, control concepts, and instruments that are used by experimental 
scientists. 

PHYSICS 417-MECHANICS. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Physics 217 or 211 and Mathematics 201. Physics 218 or 

212 and Mathematics 3^1 are recommended. Offered on demand. 

Statics, kinematics, and dynamics of particles and of systems of particles 

are developed using Newtonian principles. 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

Professor Harry Persse, Head; Associate Professor Brandon; Assistant 
Professors Ambrose, Nadalich, and Radebaugh. 

Degree Programs in Music 

The Department of Fine Arts offers the Bachelor of Arts degree with a 
major in music and the Bachelor of Music Education degree. 

Admission Requirements 

Since the college-level study of music presupposes a considerable back- 
ground in music, as well as an aptitude for it, an audition is required for 
admission to the music degree program. The audition will be used to 
determine the student's level of proficiency in his instrument and his 
potential for success in the program. 



Programs for the Degrees 

Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Music 
Bachelor of Music Education 

QudHi r Hon rs 

A. General Requirements* 71 

1. English 111, 112, 211 15 

2. Music 210 5 

3. History 114, 115, and 251 or 252 15 

4. Mathematics 101, 290 in 

5. Political Science 113 5 

6. One of the following courses: 5 

Psychology 101 (required in the B.M.Ed, program), 
Economics 201, Sociology 201, Anthropology 201 

7. Laboratory science sequence 10 

8. Physical Education 103 or L08 and 117 and 

three activity courses 6 

B. Courses in the Major Held 54 

Music 111, 112, 113, 140, (6 credits); 211, 212, 213, 240, 
(6 credits); 251 or 254, (6 credits); 312, 340, (6 credits); 
371, 372, 373 

C. Additional Requirements for 

Bachelor of Arts Degree only 66 

1. Music 281, 412, 440 ' 12 

2. Approved Music electives !» 

3. Two courses selected from: 10 

Art 271, 272. 273 

4. Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 15 

5. Electives 20 

6. Recital 

D. Additional Requirements for the 

Bachelor of Music Education Degree only 69 70 

1. Music 230, 232, 233, 235, 281, 350, 351, 3(51. 400 19 

2. One of the following options: KM 1 

a. (Choral emphasis) Music 22s, 353, 480, and one course 
from 414, 415, or 416 

b. (Instrumental emphasis) Music 227, 231, .234, 352, 181, 
and one course from 417, 418, or 410 

c. (Kevboard emphasis) Music 227, 352, or 353, 120, 121. 
480 or 4M 

3. Education 203, 330, 44(5, 447, 448 25 

4. Psychology 301 and Special Education 205 1<> 

5. Drama/Speech 22S 5 

E. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL. BACHELOR OF ALTS DEGREE 191 

TOTAL, BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION DEGREE 194 195 

Minor Concentrations 

The department offers the following minor concentrations: 

The minor in .4/7 requires a total of 25 hours: Art 111. 112; one course 

selected from Art 271. 272. 273; ten hours selected from Art 201, 202, 213, 

330, 331. 
The minor inMui sic requires a total of 29 hours: Applied Music (6 hours 

in one area): Music Theory 111, 112, 113 (9 hours); Music Ensemble 251. 

"Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit award* 

section of this Bulletin. 



252 or 254 (6 hours); Music History and Literature (8 hours); Recital 
Attendance. 

Additional Requirements for Music Majors 

1. Meet a recital attendance requirement as directed by the faculty. 

2. Enroll for applied music each quarter until the applied music require- 
ment has been met (except when student teaching). 

3. Participate in a large ensemble of the college each quarter of atten- 
dance (except when student teaching). Voice principals are required 
to enroll for chorus and band instrument principals for concert band. 
Students with a choice of ensemble must remain in the chosen ensem- 
ble for the duration of the academic year. Upon recommendation of 
the applied music instructor in the principal instrument, a keyboard 
student may substitute accompanying for participation in a large 
ensemble. However, a minimum of six quarters of large ensemble is 
required. 

4. Participate in student recitals as directed by the applied music in- 
structor. A student must perform in a quarterly student recital at 
least once a year. 

5. Demonstrate minimum keyboard proficiency (the ability to play 
scales, cadences, hymns and simple piano pieces). Students deficient 
in keyboard skills upon entering a music degree program will enroll in 
Music 226 (I, II, III), Class Piano, until the requirement is met. A 
grade of C or better in three quarters of Class Piano shall constitute 
completion of the piano proficiency requirement. The student must 
complete this requirement by the end of the sophomore year to 
continue in a music degree program. 

6. Present a recital as required in the specific degree program. For the 
B. A. degree with a concentration in performance, a half recital in the 
junior year and a full recital in the senior year are required. With a 
concentration in theory-composition the presentation of a program of 
original compositions or a comparable practical exercise is required. 
FortheB.M.E. degree, a half recital in the senior year is required. In 
the B.M.E. program, upon recommendation of the applied music 
instructor, a jury examination may be substitued for the recital. 

The applied music level for entering or transfer students will be deter- 
mined by audition. In the Bachelor of Arts degree program a minimum of 
eighteen hours of applied music will be in the principal instrument, with at 
least six credits at the 440 level. In the Bachelor of Music Education 
degree program, a minimum of twelve hours of applied music will be in the 
principal instrument with at least six credits at the 340 level. The quarterly 
applied music grade will be determined in part by a jury examination 
before a committee of the music faculty. 

Applied Music Fees 

Applied music courses consist of one twenty-five minute private lesson 
per week (Music 130) or a combination of private and class lessons (Music 



140,240, 340, 440). A special fee of $31.00 for Music L30 or $62.00 for the 
Music 140 series is charged quarterly to students not admitted to a music 

degree program, to music majors enrolled for less than ten hours, and to 
music majors enrolled for more than one applied course. The applied music 

fee is refundable only if the student does not meet his first scheduled 
lesson. 

Course Offerings 
Applied Music 

MUSIC 130-APPLIED MUSIC. (one credm 

Prerequisite: Sufficient music background, determined by audition or 
Music 100. 

One twenty-five minute lesson per week in brass, organ, percussion. 
piano, strings, voice, or woodwinds. Applicable to a music degree only for a 
secondary applied credit. May be repeated for credit. 

MUSIC 140-APPLIED MUSIC. (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Open to music majors and a limited number of non- 
majors by and it ion only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings. 
voice or woodwinds. May be repeated for credit. 

MUSIC 240-APPLIED MUSIC. (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Competency at the Music i [0 level as determined by jury 

examination . 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, 
voice or woodwinds. May be repeated for credit. 

MUSIC 340-APPLIEI) MUSIC. (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Competency at the Music 24-0 level as deU rmim d by jury 

examination. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, 
voice or woodwinds. May be repeated for credit. 

MUSIC 440-APPLIED MUSIC. (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Competency at the Music 8J4.O level as deU rmim d by 

examination. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, 
voice or woodwinds. May be repeated for credit. 

Music 

MUSIC 100-RUDIMEXTS OF MUSIC. 
Offered on demand. 

An introduction to the principles of music reading with applications to 
the keyboard, guitar and simple wind instruments. May not be used for 

credit toward a degree in music. 



01 



MUSIC 111-ELEMENTARY THEORY I. (3-2-3) 

Fall. 

An introduction to the basic theoretical principles of music including 
sightsinging, eartraining and keyboard harmony. 

MUSIC 112-ELEMENTARY THEORY II. (3-2-3) 

Winter. 

A continuation of Music III with emphasis on part- writing and diatonic 
material. 

MUSIC 113-ELEMENTARY THEORY III. (3-2-3) 

Spring. 

A continuation of Music 112 introducing seventh chords and diatonic 
modulation. 

MUSIC 200-INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC LITERATURE. (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand music by means of 
analysis of style, forms, and media of musical expression, 

MUSIC 210-HONORS INTRODUCTION TO 

MUSIC LITERATURE. (5-0-5) 

Winter and Summer. Prerequisite: Music major status or permission of 
the instructor. 

A course designed for the student with a practical musical background or 
previous listening experience. Emphasis will be on the development of 
perception of style and form through listening. May be used as a substitute 
for Music 200 in the Core Curriculum. 

MUSIC 211-INTERMEDIATE THEORY I. (3-2-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Music 113. 
A continuation of Music 113 with emphasis on chromatic harmony. 

MUSIC 212-INTERMEDIATE THEORY II. (3-2-3) 

Winter. 
A continuation of Music 211. 

MUSIC 213-INTERMEDIATE THEORY III. (3-2-3) 

Spring. 

A continuation of Music 212 with emphasis on twentieth century tech- 
niques. 

MUSIC 226-CLASS PIANO I, II, III. (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music major status or permission of 

instructor. 

A study of keyboard techniques with emphasis on the skills needed to 

fulfill the piano proficiency requirement. 

MUSIC 227-CLASS VOICE. (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music major status or permission of 

instructor. 

A study of voice production techniques with practical application to 

standard song literature. Not open to students whose principal instrument 

is voice. 



MUSIC 228-DICTION IN SINGING. (2-0-2) 

Winter. 

A study of phonetics and pronunciation of Italian, German, French, and 
Latin as applied to singing. 

MUSIC 230-BRASS METHODS. (0-2-1 ) 

Prerequisite: Music 113. 

An introduction to the principles of brass instrument performance and 
pedagogy. 

MUSIC 231-BRASS METHODS. (0-2-1) 

Prerequisite: Music 230. 
Continuation of Music 230. 

MUSIC 232-PERCUSSION METHODS. (0-2-1) 

Prerequisite: Music 113. 

An introduction to the principles of percussion instrument performance 
and pedagogy. 

MUSIC 233-WOODWIND METHODS. (0-2-1) 

Prerequisite: Music 113. 

An introduction to the principles of woodwind instrument performance 
and pedagogy. 

MUSIC 234-WOODWIND METHODS. (0-2-1 1 

Prerequisite: Music 233. 
Continuation of Music 233. 

MUSIC 235-STRING METHODS. (0-2-1 1 

Prerequisite: Music 113. 

An introduction to the principles of string instrument performance and 
pedagogy. 

MUSIC 251-SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE. (0- 

Open to qualified students. 

MUSIC 252 -JAZZ ENSEMBLE. (0-2-1 1 

Open to qualified students. 

MUSIC 254-CHORUS. (0-3-1 ) 

Open to qualified students. 

MUSIC 255-CHAMBER ENSEMBLE. (0-2-1 1 

On demand. 

Open to all qualified students in the performance media of brass, 
woodwind, string, keyboard, voice, and percussion instruments. 

MUSIC 256-KEYBOARD ACCOMPANYING. (1-0 1 

On demand. 

MUSIC 257-OPERA WORKSHOP. (2-0-1 1 

MUSIC 281-CONDUCTING. 
Alternate years. Prerequisite: Music 113. 
An introduction to the techniques of conducting and interpretation. 



MUSIC 312-FORM AND ANALYSIS. (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Music 213. 

The study of the principles of form in music and techniques of harmonic 
analysis. 

MUSIC 320-MUSIC FOR THE 

ELEMENTARY TEACHER. (5-0-5) 

Winter, Summer. 

An introduction to music skills and materials for the elementary class- 
room teacher. Not open to music majors. 

MUSIC 350-MUSIC IN THE LOWER SCHOOL. (3-0-3) 

Fall. 

A course for music majors emphasizing analysis and evaluation of tech- 
niques and materials for teaching music in the lower school. 

MUSIC 351-MUSIC IN THE MIDDLE 

AND UPPER SCHOOL. (3-0-3) 

Spring. 

A course for music majors emphasizing analysis and evaluation of tech- 
niques and materials for teaching music in the junior and senior high 
schools. 

MUSIC 352-BAND METHODS. (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. 

A course dealing with the organization, maintenance and development 
of school instrumental ensembles. 

MUSIC 353-CHORAL METHODS. (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music 227. 

A course dealing with the organization and development of school choral 
organizations, problems of choral singing, and fundamentals of choral 
conducting. 

MUSIC 361-ORCHESTRATION AND ARRANGING. (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music 213. 

An introduction to the techniques of arranging and scoring for vocal and 
instrumental ensembles. 

MUSIC 371-MUSIC HISTORY. (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: One year of music theory or permission of the instructor. 
The history of music in Western Civilization from its origins through the 

Renaissance. 

MUSIC 372-MUSIC HISTORY. (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: One year of music theoi~y or permission of the instructor. 
The history of music in Western Civilization in the Baroque and Classic 

periods. 

MUSIC 373-MUSIC HISTORY. (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Music 213 or permission of the instructor. 
The history of music in Western Civilization in the Romantic Period and 

in the 20th century. 



MUSIC 400-SEMINAR IN MUSIC EDUCATION. 

Offered on den/and. Prerequisites: Musk- 350, 351. 
A survey course for music- education majors of current i rends in Instruc- 
tion and research techniques. 

MUSIC 411— COMPOSITION, d to 5 hours) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Musk- ju, $12, 

MUSIC 412-COUNTERPOINT. 
Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Mush- 213. 
A study of contrapuntal practices of 18th century music. 

MUSIC 414— SONG LITERATURE I. 

Fall. 

A survey of German song literature. 

MUSIC 415-SONG LITERATURE II. (2-0-2) 

Winter. 

A survey of French song literature. 

MUSIC 416-SONG LITERATURE III. 2-0-2 

Spring. 

A survey ofthe song literature of English, Italian and Russian music and 
others. 

MUSIC 417-REPERTOIRE AND PEDAGOGICAL 
TECHNIQUES OF BRASS INSTRUMENTS. (2-0 2 

Prerequisite: Junior status or permission ofthe instructor. 

A survey ofthe literature and teaching techniques ofthe brass instru- 
ments. 

MUSIC 418-REPERTOIRE AND PEDAGOGICAL 
TECHNIQUES OF WOODWIND INSTRUMENTS. (2 I 

Prerequisite: Junior status or permission ofthe instructor. 
A survey ofthe literature and teaching techniques ofthe woodwind 
instruments. 

MUSIC 419— REPERTOIRE AND PEDAGOGICAL 
TECHNIQUES OF PERCUSSION [NSTRUMEN1 

Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of tin instructor. 

A survey ofthe literature and teaching techniques of the percu 

instruments. 

MUSIC 420-421— PIANO LITERATURE. 2 - 2 each coiu 

A survey of literature for the piano. 

MUSIC 422— OPERA LITERATURE. 

offered on demand . Pren quisites: Music 200or 210 or pi n 
instructor. 
A study of operatic masterpieces from the origin.- ofthe form to the 

present. 






MUSIC 480-ADVANCED CHORAL CONDUCTING. (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Music 281, 312. 
Advanced techniques for the choral conductor/ 

MUSIC 481-ADVANCED INSTRUMENTAL 

CONDUCTING. (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Music 281, 312, 361. 

Advanced techniques for the instrumental conductor. 

MUSIC 490-DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDY. (1 to 5 credits) 
Open to transient students only with permission of the Dean of Faculty 
at Armstrong and the college from which the student comes. 

Art 

ART 111-BASIC DESIGN I. (0-10-5) 

Fall. 

An introduction to two-dimensional design through problems in draw- 
ing, composition, and color. 

ART 112-BASIC DESIGN II. (0-10-5) 

Spring. 

The fundamentals of three-dimensional design introduced through 
sculptural projects in various media. 

ART 200-INTRODUCTION TO THE VISUAL ARTS. (5-0-5) 

Fall, Spring. 

A study of artistic theories, styles, media and techniques and their 
application in masterworks of art from all ages. Not recommended for art 
majors. 

ART 201 -PAINTING I. (0-6-3) 

Prerequisite: Art 111 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to painting in oils from various observed subjects and 
from sketches. 

ART 202-PAINTING II. (0-6-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Art 111 or permission of instructor. 
A continuation of Art 201. 

ART 213-FIGURE DRAWING. (0-6-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Art 111 or permission of instructor. 
An introduction to drawing the human figure. Includes basic anatomy 

for the artist, the study of master drawings of the human figure, and 

drawing directly from live models. 

ART 271 -HISTORY OF ART. (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

A survey of the visual arts in Western Civilization from archaic Greece 
to the Late Middle Ages. 

ART 272-HISTORY OF ART. (5-0-5) 

Winter. 
A continuation of Art 271. Renaissance through Rococo art. 



ART 273— HISTORY OF ART. (5-0-5) 

Spring. 
A continuation of Art 27^. Nineteenth and twentieth century art. 

ART301-PAINTIN<; III. (0-10-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Art ill and 201 or 202. 
Advanced techniques directed toward figurative images. Pictorial com- 
position. Includes study of selected master painters regarding their tech- 
nical means and aesthetic accomplishments. 

ART302-PAINTING IV. LO-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Art 301. 
A continuation of Art 301. Includes non-figurative and abstract images. 

ART320-ART FOR THE ELEMENTARY TEACHER. I 1 

Fall, Summer. 

A study, with studio experience, of materials and methods for teaching 
art at the elementary school level. 

ART 330— CERAMICS I. (0-10-5) 

Fall, Winter. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
Fundamentals of hand-built stoneware pottery including pinch, coil and 

slab construction, glaze-making, kiln loading and firing. Additional experi- 
ences may include primitive firing or Raku. 

ART 331-CERAMICS II. (0-10-5) 

Wi)iter, or on demand. Prerequisite: Art 330. 

Fundamentals of wheel-thrown pottery plus a more intensive explora- 
tion of glazing and firing including Raku. 

ART 332— SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN CERAMICS. (0-10-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Art 330 and permission oftfu 
structor. 

The content of this class is flexible and may include in-depth experiences 
in any of the following: Raku firing, primitive firing, kiln construction, 
building of pottery equipment (wheels, tools, etc.), glaze calculation, etc. 
May be repeated for credit. 

ART 350-SERIGRAPHY. LO-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Art ill or 320. 

An introduction to printmaking through the processofsilk screen print- 
ing. The entire process will be covered including the construction of screen 
printing equipment, preparation of special printing inks and various sten- 
cils (glue, tusche, paper, photoemulsion, etc.) and matting of the finished 
prints. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Roger K. Warlick, Head: Professors Beecher, Burnett, 

Clark, Covle, Duncan. Gross, Lanier. McCarthy, and Newman; Associate 



Professors Arens and Patterson; Assistant Professors Boney, Comaskey, 
Rhee, and Stone; Instructors Banner and Robertson. 

All students are reminded that any who receive degrees from the Uni- 
versity System of Georgia are required to demonstrate proficiency in U.S. 
and Georgia History and Constitutions. This requirement may be met by 
the successful completion of Political Science 113 and History 251 or 252 or 
may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Academic 
Regulations" section. 

A major in Political Science or History is most useful to those who plan to 
enter teaching, library or archival work, publishing, journalism, historic 
preservation, museology, historic site curation, or such professional fields 
as international business, law or theology. Either major is also a desirable 
foundation for opportunities in or related to government (e.g., civil and 
foreign service, A.I.D., U.S. LA., ACTION, teaching abroad, etc.). Be- 
yond these fields there is an enormous variety of organizations (local, 
national, and international) whose philanthropic, sectarian, or economic 
interests require people with the skills and sensitivity developed by a 
major in History or Political Science. 

Major in History 

Students majoring in History should satisfy the college core require- 
ments for the Bachelor of Arts degree during the Freshman and Sopho- 
more years. To complete the major requires, beyond Western Civilization 
(History 114-115) and U.S. History (History 251-252), forty quarter hours 
from courses numbered 300 or above (with grades of "C" or better) includ- 
ing History 300. Students should register for History 300 in the Sopho- 
more or early in the Junior year, or in the first possible quarter after 
making the decision to major in History. The major program must also 
include: (a) 25 quarter hours as approved by faculty advisor in related 
fields such as anthropology, history of art and music, economics, litera- 
ture, political science, philosophy, psychology, sociology, or statistics; and 
(b) a fifteen quarter hour foreign language sequence, or proficiency in a 
language through the 103 level. Students who contemplate graduate work 
in history, however, are strongly advised to continue their linguistic study 
beyond this elementary level. The history faculty will consider substitu- 
tions only when compelling reasons argue against fulfilling the language 
requirement and only when the proposed substitute offers an additional 
research skill or a study in depth of a foreign culture. In selecting course 
work, a student may emphasize the history of one particular area (e.g., 
U.S., European, or Russian- Asian- African-Latin American), but must 
take at least 10 quarter hours of history outside the area of concentration. 
Opportunities for Independent Study work exist in all three concentration 
areas, but no more than 10 such hours may be counted among the forty (40) 
upper division history hours required for the major. 

Students who hope to work in history-related fields upon graduation 
should consider doing additional work (beyond the forty required academic 
hours noted above) in the Internship Program.* Adding a minor in Mu- 
*For prerequisites, see listing for HISTORY 395. 



seum and Preservation studies will further qualify the student for an 
internship with the agencies listed below. Through this program unique 
opportunities are provided for qualified students to gain practical experi- 
ence while making a realistic- assessment of the possibilities offered by 
their field of interest. Cooperative arrangements with Historic Savanna!) 
Foundation, Georgia Historical Society. Savannah Landmark Project, 
Oatland Island Center, and with such museums and historical sites as 
Telfair Academy, Ft. Pulaski, Juliette Low Center, and Ft. King George, 
permit placement of students in positions relating to: 

(a) archival and manuscript curation, 

(b) historic site administration and interpretation, 

(c) museum studies, and 

(d) historic preservation. 

The specific nature of the internship experience will then be recorded on 
the student's transcript so as to be of value in subsequent job applications. 

Graduate courses (500 level) are open to qualifed undergraduates with 
advisor approval and permission of instructor. 

Program for the Degree 
Bachelor of Arts with a Major in History 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* HI 

1. English 111, 112, 211 and one of the following: 20 

Art 200, 271. 272, 278; Music 200; 
Philosophy 200, 201; English 222 

2. Mathematics 101; Mathematics 108, 19."). 220. or 290 lo 

3. Laboratory Science Sequence lo 

4. History 114. 115, History 251, 252 2<> 

5. Political Science 113 and one of the following: 1<» 

Psychology 101, Anthropology 201, 
Sociology 201, Economics 201 

6. Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 15 

7. Physical Education 103 or 108 and 117 and throe 

activity courses 

B. Courses in Major Field 1" 

1. History 300 5 

2. History courses 300 level or above (with at least 

10 quarter hours outside area of concentration) 

Concentration Areas: 

a) U.S. History: 

HIS. 351. 352. 365, 367, 370, 371. 374, 375. 376, : 
400. 454. 455. 485-486, 190. 505, 514. 515. 510 

b) European History: 

HIS. 333, 330,"34(), 341. 342. 313. 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 
349, 350. 41<). 483-484, 495. 536 

c) Russian- Asian- African- Latin American: 

HIS. 310, 312, 320, 321, 322, 329, 330, 128,431, 181-482, 

C. Courses in Related Fields 2"» 

To be chosen in fields such as anthropology, history of art 
and music, economics, literature, foreign languages, political 
science, sociology, psychology or statistics 

D. Electives 

E. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

•Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. Sec "Admiac 
section of this Bulletin. 



Minor Concentrations 

The minor concentration in History is both simple and practical. It is 
practical because the notation of a History minor on the transcript indi- 
cates to an employer that the applicant has some solid liberal arts back- 
ground with its accompanying insight into the development and function- 
ing of modern society and that the applicant has made an extra effort to 
refine research and writing skills so essential to dealing with that society. 
Whatever the major one chooses, a minor in History will strengthen the 
student's academic record. The minor is simple because of its require- 
ments: 

Twenty (20) hours of upper division History courses (300 level or higher) 
with grades of "C" or better. At least one course must be taken in each of 
the special areas noted above in the major program description. 

The department offers a minor concentration in Russian Studies. The 
minor, available on an interdisciplinary basis, requires 20 hours at the 
intermediate and advanced levels. 

Hours 

1. Russian 201 (assumes completion of Russian 101, 102, and 
103 as prerequisites); Political Science 349 (Comparative 
Government — Soviet Union) 10 

2. Choice of ten hours from: 

History 329, 330, 428, 431, 481 (Independent Study in Russian 
History); Comparative Literature 400 (Topics in Russian Litera- 
ture); Political Science 440 (Independent Study in Comparative 

Government — Soviet Union); History 535 10 

The department offers a minor concentration in Museum and Preserva- 
tion Studies. This minor requires 25 hours of which History 300 must be a 
part. The remaining 20 hours will be taken in one of the following tracks: 
Museum Studies: MPS 410, 411, 412, 495 
Preservation Studies: MPS 412, 420, 421, 498 
The student should plan to acquire basic knowledge in the major or related 
fields of Art History, Anthropology, American Studies, History, Public 
Administration, or other areas appropriate for utilization in Museum and 
Preservation Studies. 

Major in Political Science 

Students majoring in Political Science should satisfy the college core 
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts during their Freshman and Sopho- 
more years. To complete a Political Science major requires, beyond Ameri- 
can Government (113), forty quarter hours of upper division courses in the 
field (with grades of "C" or better). Further, the program must include at 
least one course from each of the following groups: 

I. American Political Institutions 
II. International Relations 

III. Political Theory 

IV. Comparative Government 



The major s program must also include Mathematics 220, and at least 25 
hours of course-work in such fields as Economics, History. Geography, 
Mathematics, Computer Science, Philosophy. Psychology, or Sociology. 

The Political Science major allows the option of a foreign language 
(French or German preferred) through the L03 level or a sequence of 
computer science courses. Students who contemplate graduate work in 
Political Science, however, are strongly advised to take the foreign lan- 
guage option and to continue their linguistics study beyond the L03 level. 

Program for the Degree 
Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Political Science 

Quartet Hums 

A. General Requirements* 

1. English 111. 112, 211 and one of the following: 2<) 

Art 200, 271, 272. 273; Music- 200; 
Philosophy 200, 201; English 222 

2. Mathematis 101, 22n 10 

3. Laboratorv Science Sequence lo 

4. History 114, 115; History 251 or 252 L5 

5. Political Science 113 and one of the following: lo 

Psychology 101, Anthropology 201, 
Sociology 201, Economics 201 

6. Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 or Computer Science 110. 

225, and Computer Science 136, 146, or 231 15 

7. Physical Education 103 or 108 and 117 and three 

activities courses »'« 

B. Courses in Major Field LO 

At least five quarter hours must be taken 

from each of the following areas: 

a) American Political Institutions: 

POS. 300, 304, 306, 307. 317. 318, 403. 418, 511 

b) International Affairs: 

POS. 320, 325, 326, 329 

c) Political Theorv: 

POS. 331, 332. 333. 535 

d) Comparative Government: 

POS. 341. 346. 348, 349. 540, 546 

C. Courses in Related Fields 25 

To be chosen in field such as: 

Computer Science, Economics. Geography, History. 
Mathematics. Philosophy. Psychology, or Sociology 

D. Electives 1" 

E. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

Minor Concentration 

The minor in Political Science noted on a student's transcript indi 
to an employer that the applicant for a position has some solid liberal arts 
background with its accompanying insight into the development and func- 
tioning of modern society. It also indicates that the applicant has made 
extra effort to refine the research and writing skills essential in dealing 

•Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission" 

section of this Bulletin. 



with that society. Whatever the major, a Political Science minor will 
strengthen the student's academic record. The minor requires: 

Twenty (20) hours of upper division Political Science courses (300 level 
or higher) with grades of "C" or better. At least one course must be taken 
from each of the special areas noted in the description of the major in 
Political Science. 

Program for Secondary School Teachers 

of Social Science 

(History or Political Science) 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* 86 

1. English 111, 112, 211 and one of the following: 20 

Art 200, 271, 272, 273; Music 200; 
Philosophy 200, 201; English 222 

2. Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 (required in history concen- 
tration) or Computer Science 110, 225, and Computer Science 
136 or 146 or 231 (allowed in the political science 
concentration) 15 

3. History 114, 115; History 251 or 252 15 

4. Political Science 113 and Psychology 101 10 

5. Mathematics 101, 220 10 

6. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

7. Physical Education 103 or 108 and 117 and three 

activities courses 6 

B. Courses in History Concentration Only 70 

1. History 300 5 

2. U.S. History ' 10-15 

History 371 (required if History 252 was taken in the 
General Requirements) or History 378 (required if 
History 251 was taken in the General Requirements); 
five to ten hours to be selected from History 351, 352, 
365, 367, 370, 374, 375, 376, 379, 400, 454, 455, 
485-486, 496, 505, 515, 516 

3. Russian, Asian, African, Latin- American History 10 

To be selected from History 310, 312, 320, 321, 
322, 329, 330, 428, 431, 481-482, 535 

4. European History 10-15 

To be selected from History 333, 336, 340, 341, 342, 343, 
344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 410, 483-484, 495, 536 

5. Supporting Work 30 

To be selected from two of the following fields with a 
minimum of ten quarter hours to be taken from each field: 

a) approved upper division electives in political science; 

b) Economics 201 and approved upper division electives; 

c) approved electives in behavioral sciences (sociology, 
anthropology, and psychology) 

Courses in Political Science Concentration Only 70 

1. Approved courses from each of the following areas: 40 

a) Political Institutions (300, 304, 306, 307, 317, 
318, 403, 418, 511); 

b) International Relations (320, 325, 326, 329); 

*Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission" 
section of this Bulletin. 



Quarter Hours 

c) Political Theory (331, 332, 333, 535); 

f) Comparative Government (341, 346, 348, 349, 540, 546). 

2. Supporting Work :;n 

To be selected from two of the following fields, with a 
minimum often quarter hours to D€ taken from each field: 

a) History 251 or 252 and approved upper division 
history electives; 

b) Economics 201 and an approved upper division elective; 

c) approved electives in behavioral sciences (sociology, 
anthropology, and psychology) 

C. Professional Sequence in 

1. Psychology 301, Special Education 205 10 

2. Education 203, 330, 440, 446, 447. 44* 30 

D. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL, BOTH CONCENTRATK >NS 196 



Course Offerings 
Economics 

ECONOMICS 201-PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: At minimum, eligibility to • 

Mathematics 101. 

Micro and macro economic principles. 

History 

HISTORY 114-CIVILIZATION I. (5 I 

Offered each quarter. 

A survey of the main currents of political, social, religious, and intellec- 
tual activity from the time of the ancient Middle-Eastern civilizations to 
1715. Throughout the course the major civilized traditions are considered 
and comparative methods used to facilitate interpretations of them. 

HISTORY 115-CIVILIZATION II. 

Offered each quarter. 

A continuation of History 114 to the present. 

HISTORY 191-HONORS CIVILIZATION I. (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: B's or better in High School History and an SA T 
verbal score of at least 550. 

This course replaces History 114 for selected student.-. While the sub- 
ject matter will be the same as for History 114. the treatment of it will vary 
greatly. Likewise, instruction will go beyond the usual lecture method, 
allowing students to read widely and carry out their own research under 
the direction of the professor. 

HISTORY 192— HONORS CIVILIZATION II. 
Winter. Prerequisite: History 191 or a gradi oj ".\" > h Hi. 

A continuation of History 191, this course replaces History 115. 



HISTORY 251-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1865. (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 111. 
A survey of the political, economic, and social- history of the United 

States to the end of the Civil War. 

HISTORY 252-AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865. (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for English 111. 
A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the United 

States from 1865 to the present. 

HISTORY 300-HISTORICAL METHOD. (3-4-5) 

Summer and Winter. Required of all History majors and of Museum 

and Preservation Studies minors. 

An introduction to the nature and method of historical research, treating 

problems of investigation, organization, and writing through discussion 

and actual research experience in local history. 

HISTORY 395-INTERNSHIP. (Credit variable, up to 5 hours) 

Open to transient students only with permission of the Dean of Faculty 
at Armstrong and the college from, which the student comes. Prerequisites: 
Senior standing, a minimum GPA of 3.0 in upper division History 
courses, and admission by approval of a departmental committee. 

The student will pursue an individually designed course project involv- 
ing off-campus study and research in a government or private agency. 
Projects are normally designed to require the full eleven week quarter for 
completion, during which time the student will be under the joint supervi- 
sion of the sponsoring agency and his faculty advisor. Application and 
credit arrangements must be made through the department in advance, 
normally by mid-quarter preceding the quarter of the internship. 

This internship will be credited among electives, not as a part of the 
minimum 40 hours of traditional work required for the major. 

United States History 

HISTORY 351-HISTORY OF AMERICAN THOUGHT I. (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1979. 
An examination of the principal trends in American thought to 1865. 

HISTORY 352-HISTORY OF AMERICAN THOUGHT II. (5-0-5) 
Fall, 1980. 
A continuation of History 351 to the present. 

HISTORY 365-THE AMERICAN INDIAN. (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1981. 
A study of the history and cultures of the aborigines of the Americas. 

HISTORY 367-AMERICAN URBAN HISTORY. (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1980. 

A study of the process of urbanization in America from colonial times to 
the present, with attention to the causes of urban expansion, institutional 
development, class structure and mobility, problems of the city, reform, 



1A/1 



the image of the city in popular thought, and the impact of urbanization on 

national life. 

HISTORY 370— HISTORY OF SAVANNAH, 

1733 TO THE PRESENT. (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1979. 

Begins with a history of local Indians, emphasis on the founding of the 

colony at Savannah and on the colonial. Revolutionary, antebellum and 

Post-Civil War periods. Political, economic, social, religious and artistic 
trends are discussed and placed in context of Georgia and U.S. history. 

The course will involve considerable research in primary sources availa- 
ble locally. 

HISTORY 371-COLONIAL AND 

REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA. (5 

Spring, 1980. 

A study of the discoveries of the New World and the settlement and 
growth of the English colonies of North America, the American triumph 
over France in the New World, the drastic change in British colonial policy 
and the rise of American opposition to it, the achievement of independence 
and the establishment of the United States under the Constitution. 

HISTORY 374-WOMEN IN AMERICAN HISTORY. (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1981. 

Women in American History: An examination of the changing political, 
social, and economic roles of the American woman from colonial times to 
the present. Emphasis will be given to the pre-Civil War feminist reform 
movements, woman's broader social and economic role after the war, her 
awakening awareness of the need for political power, and the mid-20th 
century revolution. 

HISTORY 375— CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION. (5 

Winter. 

The causes and significance of the American Civil War, with minor 
consideration of the military campaign: political, economic and social as- 
pects of reconstruction. 

HISTORY 376-FOUNDATIONS OF MODERN AMERICA. 
Winter, 1980. 

An analysis of institutions and forces which molded American life in the 
late 19th and early 20th centuries, including politics, economics, society, 

and thought. 

HISTORY 378-RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY. 

Spring, 1980. 

The course covers twentieth century American History, with emphasis 
on political, economic, and social issues. 

HISTORY 379— CONTEMPORARY AMERICA. 

Spring. 1981. 

An examination of the society of the United States since World War II. 
with special emphasis given to the major social and cultural trends. 

m:, 



HISTORY 400-SEMINAR IN AMERICAN HISTORY. (5-0-5) 

Permission of instructor required for admission. Offered on demand. 
Designed to permit a group of advanced students to pursue intensive 

research on a special topic in the field to be defined by the instructor. 

HISTORY/POLITICAL SCIENCE 416/516-UNITED 
STATES: CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY. (5-0-5) 

A study of the origins, content, and expansion of the Constitution of the 
United States. 

HISTORY 454-STUDIES IN AMERICAN DIPLOMACY. (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1979. Prerequisite: History 251 or equivalent. 

Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from colo- 
nial times to World War I. 

HISTORY 455-STUDIES IN AMERICAN DIPLOMACY. (5-0-5) 
Winter, 1980. 
A continuation of History 454 to the present. 

HISTORY 485-486-INDEPENDENT STUDY 

IN UNITED STATES HISTORY. (1-5 hours credit) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: History 300 and at least 15 
additional hours in upper division History coures (with a minimum GPA 
of 3.0), an overall GPA of 2.5 (after completion of 120 hours), and an 
approved application. Open to transient students only with the permission 
of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the college from which the 
student comes. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and 
reading in the chosen field under the supervision of a member of the 
History faculty. An application must be filed with the department, in 
advance, normally by mid-quarter preceding the independent study. A full 
description of the requirements and an application may be obtained in the 
departmental office. 

HISTORY 496-AMERICAN HISTORIOGRAPHY. (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1980. 

A study of the writing of American history from colonial times to the 
present with emphasis on the historical philosophies and interpretations of 
the major schools of thought as well as individual historians. Recommen- 
ded especially to students contemplating graduate work in History. 

NOTE: 500-level courses in HISTORY are open to qualified undergrad- 
uates with advisor approval and permission of the instructor. 

HISTORY 505-UNITED STATES: 1914 TO PRESENT. (5-0-5) 

Summer, 1979. 

Covering the most recent period in U.S. History, the course emphasizes 
political, economic, and social issues. 



1fl£ 



HISTORY 514-UNITKD STATES: 

DIPLOMATIC HISTORY I. (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1980, evening. 

Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from colo- 
nial times to World War I. 

HISTORY 515-UNITED STATES: 

DIPLOMATIC HISTORY II. (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1981, evening. 
A continuation of History 514 to the present. 

HISTORY 516-UNITED STATES 

CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY. (5 5) 

Summer, 1979. 

A study of the origins, content, and expansion of the ( institution of the 

United States. 

European History 

HISTORY 333-MODERN GERMANY, 1789-1933. (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1981. 

A study of German from the pluralism of the Holy Roman Empire 
through the German conferation to the unified Reich. Attention will l^- 
given to the political, social, and cultural developments in Austria, Prus- 
sia, and the "Third Germany." 

HISTORY 336-MODERN EAST CENTRAL EUROPE. (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1980. 

A survey of the history of the nations between Germany and Russia in 
the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics to be covered include the rise of 
nationalism, the gaining of independence, problems in establishing democ- 
racy, experience during World War II, and the establishment of commu- 
nist control. 

HISTORY 340— ENGLISH HISTORY, 1660-1815. (5 

Spring, 1981. 

An investigation of the Restoration monarchies, the constitutional revo- 
lution of 1688, the rise of ministerial responsibility in the early L8th 
century, the American colonial revolt, and England's relationship to the 
French Revolution. 

HISTORY 341-ENGLISH HISTORY. L485-1660. (5 I 

Winter, 1981. 

An analysis of political, consitutional, economic, and religious issues 
under the Tudors and early Stuarts, including the English Civil War. 

HISTORY 342— ANCIENT HISTORY. 

Winter, 1981. 

A study of the early civilizations of the Middle East, the Greek city 
states, the Roman republic and empire, with special emphasis on the 

social, political and cultural contributions of these ancient people 



HISTORY 343-EARLY MIDDLE AGES, A.D. 333-C.1000. (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1980. 

The history of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire through the 
Carolingian period with special emphasis on the institutional develop- 
ments which led to the emergence of stable kingdoms out of the chaos of the 
barbarian invasions. 

HISTORY 344-THE HIGH MIDDLE AGES, 

C. 1000 TO C.1300. (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1981. 

The history of Europe from c.1000 to c.1300 with emphasis on the 
struggle between church and state, the Crusade movement, and the 12th 
century intellectual renaissance, all of which profoundly influenced the 
development of the various medieval kingdoms. 

HISTORY 345-THE LATE MIDDLE AGES 

AND RENAISSANCE. (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1981. 

The history of Europe from c. 1300 to 1517 with emphasis on the political, 
cultural, and intellectual developments which transformed, medieval and 
Renaissance society. 

HISTORY 346-REFORMATION ERA. (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1979. 

A study of the controversial era emphasizing its major issues and move- 
ments, and their development through the Thirty Years War. Political, 
social, and economic, as well as religious facets of the upheaval will be 
considered. 

HISTORY 347-THE FRENCH REVOLUTION 

AND NAPOLEON. (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

The ideas and events of the Old Regime and the Enlightenment in 
France, with emphasis on the impact of the French Revolution and the 
career of Napoleon upon the major European nations. 

HISTORY 348-THE HISTORY OF EUROPE 

FROM 1815 to 1900. (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1980. 

A study of the most important social, political, and intellectual directions 
of European history from the Congress of Vienna to the end of the nine- 
teenth century. 

HISTORY 349-ABSOLUTISM AND 

THE ENLIGHTENMENT. (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1981. 

The primary focus of this course is the social and intellectual history of 
western Europe during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 



108 



HISTORY 350-EUROPE IN THE 

TWENTIETH CENTURY. (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

A study of the major developments in Europe since L900, with emphasis 

upon the origins and impact of the First and Second World Wars. 

HISTORY 410-SEMINAR IN EUROPEAN HISTORY. h0-5) 

Permission of instructor required for admission. Winter, 1980. 

A detailed analysis of a specific problem in European history by exami- 
nation of primary materials. 

HISTORY 483-484-INDEPENDENT STUDY IN- 
EUROPEAN HISTORY. (1-5 hours credit) 

Available each quarter. 

See History 485-486 (United States History) for prerequisites and ad- 
mission requirements. 

HISTORY 495-EUROPEAN HISTORIOGRAPHY. (5 I 

Fall, 1980. 

A study of the writers of history in the Western cultural tradition, with 
an emphasis on the historical philosophies, interpretations, and problems 
raised by the major modern European historians. Recommended spe- 
cially to students contemplating graduate work in History. 

NOTE : 500-level courses i)i HISTORY are open to qualified undergrad- 
uates with advisor approval and permission of the instructor. 

HISTORY 536-EUROPEAN DIPLOMATIC HISTORY. 5-0-5) 

Summer, 1980. 

An intensive study of the origins and development of European diplo- 
macy, the instruments of power, the interrelationship of diplomacy and 
military forces, the limits of national power, economic objectives, and the 
fundamentals of national objectives. Europe's special political and military 
role will be examined, as it applies to Great Britian, France. Germany, 
Russia, Austria, and Spain. 

Russian, Asian, African, Latin-American History 

HISTORY 310-LATIN AMERICA. 

Fall, 1979. 

An introductory course in Latin-American history with consideration 
given to institutions of the areas as well as events and personalities. 

HISTORY 312-HISTORY OF AFRICA. 

Spring, 1980. 

A survey of African civilizations from ancient times, with major empha- 
sis on development of the continent since 1800. 

HISTORY 320-TRADITIONAL CHINA. 

Fall, 1980. 

The history of Fast Asia civilization from ancient times through the 
eighteenth century, with emphasis on characteristic political, economic, 

and social developments. 

i no 



HISTORY 321-MODERN CHINA. (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1981. 

The history of China from the nineteenth century to the present, with 
emphasis on political, social, economic, and intellectual developments. 

HISTORY 322-HISTORY OF JAPAN. (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1980. 

A survey of the history of Japan, with major emphasis placed upon the 
development of Japan since 1600. 

HISTORY 329-MEDIEVAL RUSSIA. (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1979. 

A survey of the economic, social, and political development of the Rus- 
sian state from its foundation in the 9th century through its modernization 
by Peter the Great in the early 18th century. 

HISTORY 330-MODERN RUSSIA. (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

A survey of Russian history from Peter the Great to the present. The 
major political, cultural, economic, and social developments of Russia in 
both the Imperial and Soviet periods will be covered. 

HISTORY 428-RUSSIA AND THE WEST. (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1980. 

A detailed study of the impact of Western influence on the Muscovite 
state in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 

HISTORY 431-THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION. (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1980. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 
An examination of the Russian revolutionary tradition, the causes for 

the collapse of Tsarism, the Bolshevik Revolution, and victory in the 

Russian Civil War. 

HISTORY 481-482-INDEPENDENT STUDY IN RUSSIAN/ 
ASIAN/AFRICAN/LATIN-AMERICAN HISTORY.(l-5 hours credit) 

Available each quarter. 

See History 485-486 (United States History) for prerequisites and ad- 
mission requirements. 

NOTE: 500-level HISTORY courses are open to qualifed undergradu- 
ates with advisor approval and permission of instructor. 

HISTORY 535-HISTORY OF RUSSIAN 

FOREIGN POLIGY. (5-0-5) 

Summer, 1981. 

This course reviews historically the development of Soviet foreign policy 
toward Western European states, notably Germany, and also with the 
non-European world through 1917-1940, World War II, and Cold War 
phases. Special attention will be given in this last phase to U.S. -Soviet 
rivalry, Soviet relations with other communist states in Eastern Europe, 
China, and the Third World, and to the recent moves toward detente. 



110 



.Museum and Preservation Studies 

MPS 410-CURATORSHIP. (6-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: History 800. 

Deals with the historical background and purpose of curatorship, con- 
servation, restoration technology, research including authentication, cata- 
loging and organizing collection.-. 

MPS 411— INTERPRETATION. 
Winter. Prerequisite: History 300. 

A study of exhibits, educational programs and community out reach, 
tour planning and guiding, publication.-, electronic media, and other inter- 
pretation techniques. 

MPS 412— ADMINISTRATION. (5 

Spring. Prerequisite: History 800. 

A study of organizational techniques and policy, public relations and 
marketing, membership, budgeting, personnel relation.-, security, insur- 
ance and such other topics as are pertinent. 

MPS 420-AN INTRODUCTION TO 

HISTORIC PRESERVATION. (5-0-6) 

Winter. Prerequisite: History 800. 

A survey of the field including values, principles, practices; develop- 
ment of planning and organization for preservation; preservation law, 
economics and politics. 

MPS 421-ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY. 
Summer. 

A study of various styles of American architecture, Georgian, Federal, 

Neoclassical, Eclecticism and modern; slides from Historic American 
Building Survey; landscape architecture. Visiting speakers and field trips 
will be used. 

MPS495-INTERNSHIP IN MUSEUM STUDIES. 
Prerequisites: MPS £10, 411 , and U2 with a "Cork iter in < ach co 

The student will pursue an individually designed course project involv- 
ing off-campus study and research in a government or private agency 
involved in museum work. Projects are normally designed to require the 
full eleven week quarter for completion, during which time the student will 
be under the joint supervision of the sponsorsing agency and his faculty 
sponsor. 

MPS 498— INTERNSHIP IX PRESERVATION STUDIES. 

Prerequisites: MPS />20, WJ. \21 with a "C" or h, fa 
See MPS 495 for description, except that placement will be with an 
appropriate preservation agency. 



Ill 



Geography 

GEOGRAPHY 111-WORLD HUMAN GEOGRAPHY. (5-0-5) 

Winter and Summer. 

A survey of world human geography, emphasizing population character- 
istics, topographic features, distribution of economic activities and geopo- 
litical problems within the major geographic regions. Consideration of 
adequacy of resources to support expanding world populations. 

Political Science 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 113-GOVERNMENT OF 

THE UNITED STATES. (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

A study of the structure, theory, and functions of the national govern- 
ment in the United States and some of the major problems of the state and 
local government. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 300-RESEARCH METHODS. (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Political Science 113. 

This course deals with the methods and techniques of research in the 
behavioral sciences. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to evaluate 
research. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 304-POLITICS OF 

BUREAUCRACY. (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or equivalent. 

This is a one-quarter course that is primarily concerned with organiza- 
tional theory and bureaucratic behavior, whether public or private, but 
with an emphasis on the behavior of the bureaucracy of the national 
government. Attention will also be given to political process as it unfolds in 
the administration of laws enacted by the Congress. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 306-LOCAL GOVERNMENT. (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or equivalent. 
A study of the environment, structure, function, political processes, and 
policies of city, county, and other local governments in the United States. 
Special attention will be given to the city governments of Savannah, Ga.; 
Charleston, S.C.; and Gainesville, Fla. Large diverse cities, such as At- 
lanta, Jacksonville, Tampa, and Miami will also be compared in a more 
limited fashion and contrasted with Savannah, Charleston, and Gaines- 
ville. Policies examined will include finance (raising and spending money), 
•education, welfare, pollution, transportation, and law enforcement. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 307-STATE GOVERNMENT. (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or equivalent. 
A study of the environment, structure, function, political processes, and 
policies of state governments in the United States. Special attention will 
be given to the governments of Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina and 
to their role in the federal system. Policies examined will include finance 
(raising and spending money), pollution, transportation, and law enforce- 
ment. 

112 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 317-CONSTITUTIOXAL LAW I. (5-0-5) 
Fall. Prerequisite: Political Science 118 or equivalent. 
A study of the development of the United States government through 

judicial interpretation of the Constitution. The case study method of 

analysis is used, but some attention Is given also to recent behavioral 

writing on judicial decision-making. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 318-CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II. (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Political Science 118 or equivalent. 

A continuation of Political Science 317. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 320-INTERNATIOXAL RELATION 
THE FAR EAST 

Fall, 1979. 

Contemporary international politics in the Far Fast are examined in 
terms of such broad historical trends as the decline of imperialism, the 
development of nationalism, and the rise of the U.S., U.S.S.R., People's 
Republic of China, and Japan as major powers in Asia. 

Some attention will be given to contemporary key issues such as the 
Sino-Soviet conflict, the future of Formosa, U.S. -Japan Mutual Security 
Treaty revision, and U.S. -Japan economic interaction. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 325-INTERNATIONAL 
ORGANIZATION. (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Political Science 118 or permission of instructor. 

A survey of the development, principles, structures and functions of 
international organizations, with emphasis upon the role of these institu- 
tions in the maintenance of peace. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 326-INTERNATIONAL LAW. C^-:» 

Spring. Prerequisite: Political Science 118 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to selected public international law topics including: 
recognition, state succession, jurisdiction, extradition, nationality, the 
law of treaties, the law of diplomacy, and the law of war. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 329-INTERNATIONAL 

RELATIONS. 5 0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Political Science 118 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the theories, forces, and practices dominating con- 
temporary international relations. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 331-POLITICAL THEORY I. (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

An historical study of the development of ideas relative to the state and 
government from Socrates and Plato to the Seventeenth Century. Atten- 
tion is directed primarily to the political thought of a selected group of 
eminent philosophers. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 332— POLITICAL THEORY [I. 
Winter. Prerquisite: Political Sciena 881 or pi rn 

A continuation of Political Science 331, from the 17th to the 20th cen- 
tury. 

i l :> 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 333-CONTEMPORARY 

POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES. (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Political Science 332 or permission of instructor . 

A continuation of Political Science 332, including a general survey and 
analysis of the important ideological currents of our time with selected in- 
depth readings from original sources. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 341-POLITICS OF 

DEVELOPING NATIONS. (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1980. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or permission of in- 
structor. 

An analysis of the theories, concepts, and the process of the political 
development and modernization of the emerging nations. 

A general introduction to the concepts and problems of political integra- 
tion, transformation of political culture, elite recruitment/political social- 
ization, and political processes of selected emerging nations. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 346-COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT: 
EAST ASIA. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or permission of instructor. 

A comparative examination of the contemporary political institutions, 
processes, and ideas of the People's Republic of China, Japan, and Korea. 
Examines the development of these political systems with particular em- 
phasis on historical, social, cultural, and contemporary-issue dimensions. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 349-COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT: 
SOVIET UNION. (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1981. Prerequisite: Political Science 113 or permission of in- 
structor. 

An analytical and comparative study of the political system of the 
U.S.S.R. and the Soviet bloc of nations in Eastern Europe. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 395-INTERNSHIP. (Credit variable, 

up to 5 hours) 

Prerequisite: Junior (with 3.5 GPA) or Senior standing (with a 3.0 GPA 
minimum) . 

The student will pursue an individually designed course project involv- 
ing off-campus study and research in a government or private agency. 
Projects are normally designed to require the full eleven-week quarter for 
completion, during which time the student will be under joint supervision 
by the sponsoring agency and his faculty advisor. Application and arrange- 
ments must be made through the department by mid-quarter preceding 
the quarter of the internship. 

Open to transient students only with permission of the Dean of Faculty 
at Armstrong and the college from which the student comes. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 400-SENIOR SEMINAR. (5-0-5) 

Admission will be subject to approval of the instructor. Offered on 

demand. Designed to permit superior students to pursue research and 

reading in some field of political science under the supervision of the staff. 



114 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 403-PUBLIC POLICY 

DEVELOPMENT. (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Political Science 304 orpermission ofthe instruc- 
tor. 

This course is primarily concerned with a study of the theoretical aspects 
of decision-making theories (i.e., rational/comprehensive model vs. incre- 
mental model), political aspects of policy-making process, mobilization of 
political support, and the cost/benefit aspects of the public policy-making. 

Some attempt will be made to apply the general theory of public policy- 
making to specific settings of welfare policy, urban problems, and national 
defense/foreign policy. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 410-INDEPENDKNT STUDY IX 
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT. (credit variable) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: A minimum of 120 credit hours, 
including at least 20 hours in Political Science at the 300-levi I or about . 
Admission is by approval of a departmental committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and 
reading in some field of political science under the supervision of a member 
of the staff. Emphasis will be on wide reading, conferences with the 
advisor and written reports and essays. Normally open only to students 
with a B average (3.0) in Political Science and at least a 2.5 GPA overall. 
Applications must be filed with the Department by mid-quarter preceding 
the quarter independent study is contemplated. 

Open to transient students only with permission of the Dean of Faculty 
at Armstrong and the college from which the student comes. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 418-ADMINISTRATIVE LAW. (5-0-6) 

Spring. Prereuisite: Political Science 113. 

This course explores the framework of law governing administrative 
agencies including: administrative power and its control by the courts, the 
determination and enforcement of administrative programs, discretion of 
administrative officials and their powers of summary actions, hearings 
before administrative boards, and the respective spheres of administra- 
tive and judicial responsibility. 

Some attention will be given to the problem of the maintenance of 
traditional procedural safeguards in administrative law and the problem of 
civil rights and relation to administrative boards. Leading cases will be 
examined. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 420-INDEPENDENT STUDY IX 
INTERNATIONAL RELATIOXS. edit variable) 

Arailable each quarter. 

See Political Science 410 for prerequisites and admission requirements. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 430— INDEPENDENT STUDY IX 
POLITICAL THEORY. (credit variable) 

Available each quarter. 

See Political Science 410 for prerequisites and admission requirements. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 440-INDEPENDENT STUDY IN 
COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT. (credit variable) 

Available each quarter. 

See Political Science 410 for prerequisites and admission requirements. 

NOTE: The following graduate courses in Political Science are open to 
qualified undergraduates with advisor approval and permission of the 
instructor. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 511-AMERICAN PRESIDENCY. (5-0-5) 

Summer, 1980. 

Offers an in-depth survey of the office of the presidency, with the 
principal emphasis on the relations of the executive branch with the 
Congress and the court system. Some attention will be given to the 
evolution of the presidency to its present dominant position in the Ameri- 
can political process. (Completion of a survey course in American History 
is desirable.) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 535-ORIGINS OF 

TOTALITARIANISM. (5-0-5) 

Summer, 1979; Fall, 1980. 

An analysis of the socio-psychological basis of modern totalitarian move- 
ments. Major emphasis will be placed on pre- World War II Nazi Germany. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 540-COMPARATIVE 

POLITICAL ANALYSIS. (5-0-5) 

Summer, 1980. 

This course is mainly theoretical. It deals with the various approaches, 
concepts, and methodologies that are being used in the analysis of com- 
parative politics, viz: the traditional approach (formal-legal), group theory 
of politics, systems analysis, structural-functional analysis, communica- 
tions theory, decision-making theory, game theory, etc. At the same time, 
each approach is examined as it is used in comparing the politics of various 
countries. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 546-FAR EASTERN GOVERNMENT 
AND POLITICS. (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1979. 

Description and comparative analysis of the political systems of Commu- 
nist China and Japan. Special attention is given to historical development, 
political institutions and processes, political culture, political socialization, 
and contemporary problems. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES AND 
LITERATURE 

Professor Hugh Pendexter, III, Head; Professor Emeritus Lubs; Pro- 
fessors Anchors, Easterling, Jones, Killorin, Strozier; Associate Profes- 
sors Brooks, Brown, Noble; Assistant Professors Harper, Harris, 
Jenkins, Ramsey, Suchower, Welsh and White. 



Entering students should begin the required English composition se- 
quence no later than the second quarter of their attendance. By doing so, 
students will have had the opportunity to complete the required sequence 

before taking the Regents Examination. 

Students enrolled in the degree programs which require a foreign lan- 
guage must show proficiency in the appropriate language at the required 
level by successfully completing standardized examinations administered 
by members of the foreign language faculty. This requirement applies to 
students enrolled at Armstrong State College and taking their foreign 
language courses on this campus and to students who, while enrolled at 
Armstrong State College, take their foreign language courses on another 
campus. Students transferring to Armstrong State College, after having 
completed the required foreign language sequence at another college, with 
grades of "C" or above, are not required to complete the proficiency 
examinations at Armstrong. 

Entering freshmen who wish to exempt the foreign language require- 
ment may do so by successfully completing the proficiency examination 
through the level required in a specific degree program. For further 
information on the exemption process, the student should contact the 
Head of the Department of Languages and Literature. 

Major in English 

Students majoring in English should satisfy the college core require- 
ments for the Bachelor of Arts degree during the Freshman and Sopho- 
more years. Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in each :->< K) or 1* N I 
level course included in the major. Graduate courses (500 level) are open to 
qualified undergraduates with Advisor's permission and permission of the 
instructor. 

Program for the Degree 
Bachelor of Arts with a Major in English 

(^ // n rtt T ; 

A. General Requirements* 1<»1 

1. English 111, 112, 211, 222 20 

2. Mathematics 101, 290 1" 

3. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

4. History 114, 115 and History 251 or 252 15 

5. Political Science 113 and one course selected from: 1<> 

Psychology 101, Anthropology 201, 
Sociology 201, Economics 201 

6. Foreign Language 101, 102, 103, 201 20 

7. Two courses selected from: 10 

Art 200. 271, 272, 273; Music 200; 
Philosophy 201; Drama/Speech 227, 228 

8. Physical Education 103 or 108 and 117 and three 

activities courses 

B. Courses in Major Field M) 

1. English 406 

•Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit award* 

section of this Bulletin. 



Quarter Hours 

2. One course in English Literature before 1800 

to be selected from: 5 

English 300, 302, 304, 320 

3. One course in English Literature after 1800 

to be selected from: 5 

English 305, 306, 307 

4. One course in American Literature to be selected from: 5 

English 308, 309, 310 

5. Ten hour survey of World Literature: 

English 327, 328 10 

6. Two additional courses in English Language 

or in Literature 10 

C. Related Field Requirements 25 

Courses numbered 300 or above in the following areas: 
Art, Drama/Speech, History, Literature, Music, Philosophy 

D. Approved Electives 25 

E. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

Program for Secondary School Teachers of English 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* 101 

1. English 111, 112, 211, 222 20 

2. Mathematics 101, 290 10 

3. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

4. History 114, 115; History 251 or 252 15 

5. Political Science 113 and Psychology 101 10 

6. Foreign Language 101, 102, 103, 201 20 

7. Drama/Speech 228 or 314 and one of the following: 10 

Art 200, 271, 272, 273; 

Music 200; Philosophy 200, 201 

8. Physical Education 103 or 108 and 117 and three 

activities courses 6 

B. Courses in Major 40 

1. English 406 

2. One course in British Literature before 1800 

to be selected from: 5 

English 300, 302, 304, 320 

3. One course in British Literature after 1800 

to be selected from: 5 

English 305, 306, 307 

4. One course in American Literature to be selected from: 5 

English 308, 309, 310 

5. Ten hour survey of World Literature 10 

English 327 and 328 

6. English 325 or 410 5 

7. One additional English course — 300 or 400 level 5 

C. Related Field Requirements 20 

Four courses (300 level or above) to be selected from the 
following disciplines: Art, Drama/Speech, History, 
Music, Philosophy 

D. Professional Sequence 45 

1. Psychology 301; Special Education 205 10 

2. Education 203, 330, 425, 439, 446, 447, 448 35 

E. Regents and Exit Examinations ^~ 

"Certain courses, may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission" 
section of this Bulletin. 



Minor Concentrations 

The following minor concentrations arc available from the Department 
of Languages and Literature. For completion of each of the minor.-, the 
student must earn a grade of "C" or bettor in each course offered for the 
minor. 

The minor in American Civilization requires the completion of Ameri- 
can Civilization 382 and 403 (10 hours), with a choice of three of the 
following (15 hours): AC/English 308, 309, 310; AC/History351, 362, 376, 
378. 

The minor in Drama/Speech requires Dr/S 22.^ (5 hours) and electivea 
(20 hours) chosen from Dr/S courses at the 300/400 level. 

The minor in Foreign Language requires 25 hours in any one foreign 
language. 

The minor in Journalism requires 20 hours to be chosen from: 
English/Journalism 840; DrS/Joumalism 347, 350; Journalism 343, 364, 
400. 

The minor in Linguistics requires 20 hours to be chosen from: 
English/Linguistics 325, 340, 410; Linguistics 385, MX). 

The minor in Philosophy requires 20 hours to be chosen from Philosophy 
courses at the 300/400 level. 

The minor in English requires 20 hours to be chosen from English 
courses at the 300/400 level. 

Course Offerings 

American Civilization 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 225-INTRODUCTION TO 
AMERICAN CIVILIZATION. 

Offered on demand. 

Themes and issues of American Civilization since colonial times, with 
emphasis on modern setting, using Interdisciplinary approaches. 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 308— Same as English 308 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 309-Same as English 309. 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 310— Same as English 310. 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 382-DIRECTED READING 

IN AMERICAN CULTURE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Ten hours in approved A 
Civilization courses. 

A study of both fine and popular arts of the United State.- under the 
supervision of an American Civilization staff member. 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 1'):; -INDEPENDENT STUDY 
Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of all other requin 

American Civilization minor. 

Designed to permit the student to pursue individual research in some 
aspects of American Civilization under the supervision <>f an American 

Civilization staff member. 



Comparative Literature 

English 211 is prerequisite to all 300-400 level Comparative Literature 
courses. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 317-ANCIENT EPIC. (5-0-5) 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 318-ANCIENT 

DRAMA (5-0-5) 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 400-SPECIAL 
TOPICS. (5-0-5) 

To be announced as offered. 

Drama/Speech 

Successful completion of English 111 is prerequisite to all 
Drama/ Speech courses except 227. 

DrS 217-PUBLIC SPEAKING. (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. 

Theory and practice in varied public speaking situations; emphasis on 
organization, clarity, and delivery technique. 

DrS 227-THEATRE LABORATORY. (0-3-1) 

Offered every quarter. 

Practical experience in theatre. The student will work on the Masquers' 
production of the quarter. Only one hour of credit may be earned per 
quarter. The maximum total credit allowed in Theatre Laboratory is five 
quarter hours. 

In the summer students may take up to five hours credit in DrS 227 by 
working part-time in summer theatre workshop (DrS 450). 

DrS 228-FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: English 111. Offered every quarter. 

Practice and theory of oral communication. Each student makes several 
major speeches. The physiology of the speech mechanisms is covered, and 
articultion is studied within the framework of the International Phonetic 
Alphabet. 

DrS/FILM 340-DEVELOPMENT OF THE CINEMA. (5-0-5) 

A study of the history and development of the cinema with special 
emphasis on the American dominance of the medium. 

DrS 341 -ORAL INTERPRETATION. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: English 111. 

A practical course in the oral interpretation of poetry and prose. The 
techniques of literary analysis are stressed along with the vocal techniques 
needed to communicate an author's mood and meaning. 



DrS342-ADVAX('KI) ACTING. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: English ill plus at least two credit 
hours in DrS 227. 

Intensive study of characterization and stylo of acting from several 
points: historical, critical, practical, theoretical, and experimental. Em- 
phasis on development performance skills. 

DrS 345-HISTORY OF THE THEATRE. 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: English 111. 
A survey of theatrical art from its beginning to the present day. The 
course emphasizes the development of the physical theatre. 

DrS 346-PLAY PRODUCTION. 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: English ill. 

A course in the theory and practice of acting and directing, with special 
attention to image-making on stage. Individuals under supervision pro- 
pare and execute the production of scenes and short plays. 

DrS/JOURNALISM 347-BASIC TV PRODUCTION. (2-9-5) 

A course in the theory and practice of television production styles. 
forms, and concepts, with special emphasis on the critical appreciation of 
electronic communication technique. 

DrS/FILM/JOURNALISM 350-FILM AS AX ART. (5 

Study of film theories or of genres with emphasis on critical appreciation 

of film as an art form. (Course may be repeated when topic changi 

DrS 400-SPECIAL TOPICS. (1-5XH1-5). 

Prerequ isite: English 111. 

The special subject matter in this course will be determined and an- 
nounced by the professor at the time when the course is offered. 

DrS 450-451-452— DRAMA WORKSHOP. (0-15-5 each course) 

Offered in summer only. 

This course is summer stock theatre for credit. Students will be din 
and instructed by a member of the faculty who is a professional in the 
theatre. All aspects of production will be studied. 

DrS 490— INDEPENDENT STUDY. '1 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: S< nior status plus English in plus 
at least one .loo level DrS course. Open to transit nt stua\ nts only with fix 
permission of Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and tin collegt from which 
the student comes. 

English 

ENGLISH 107-RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION. 
Training in the gathering, ordering, and presenting of information with 

emphasis on persuasiveness and accuracy. The students will be expe 
to write informative and persuasive prose. This course may not satisfy the 
requirements in Area I of the Core. 



ENGLISH 110-ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

This course is designed to prepare students whose native language is 
other than English to do normal college work in composition. Students who 
pass the course will be eligible for English 111 or, upon recommendation by 
the instructor, for English 112. Admission is by placement test or by 
permission of the instructor. The course may not be used in Area I of the 
Core unless the student meets the proficiency level established by the 
department. 

ENGLISH 111-COMPOSITION AND FICTION. (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

Assignment to this course is based upon the results of the Diagnostic 
Test for placement in beginning English courses or upon successful com- 
pletion of English 99, 107, or 110. The instruction focuses on rhetoric, 
organization of ideas, and techniques of reading. 

ENGLISH 112-COMPOSITION AND POETRY. (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of English 

111 or English 191. 

ENGLISH 191-HONORS COMPOSITION. (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

Instruction in this course will not follow the traditional lecture method 
only; the student will read widely and write a research paper (or papers) in 
the fashion which the instructor thinks will best discipline him for indepen- 
dent study. This course replaces English 111 for students selected by the 
department on the basis of admission test scores. 

ENGLISH 192-HONORS COMPOSITION AND 

INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: English 191 or a grade of "A" in English 111. Winter. 

In this course the student will read more extensively than for English 

112 and will write critical papers. 

ENGLISH 211-COMPOSITION AND DRAMA. (4-2-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: English 112 or English 192. 
This course is prerequisite to all 300-400 level courses in English and 

Comparative Literature. 

ENGLISH 222-LITERATURE AND THE 

HUMAN CONDITION. (5-0-5) 

Offered every quarter. Prerequisite: English 211. 

A course ordered around one or all of these questions: (1) man's nature, 
needs and goals; (2) his place in nature; (3) his relationship to human 
society. The works read may investigate in depth one point of view on 
these questions or may explore several contrasting viewpoints. The stu- 
dent will be asked to order and express, at least tentatively, his own views. 
No term or research paper required. 



ENGLISH 250-INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITION. (5-0-5) 

Institutional Credit. Offered on demand. 
A course designed to correct deficiencies in writing revealed by the 

Regents Examination. Prerequisite: Completion of the English core re- 
quirements of the student's program. Docs not count in the core. 

ENGLISH 211 is prerequisite for all 300-400 level courses. 

ENGLISH 300-EARLY ENGLISH LITERATURE: 
BEGINNINGS THROUGH 1603. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 302-17TH CENTURY BRITISH 

POETRY AND PROSE: 1603-1700. (5-0-5) 

Offered on den/ and. 

ENGLISH 304-18TH CENTURY BRITISH 

POETRY AND PROSE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 305-19TH CENTURY I: BRITISH 

ROMANTIC POETRY AND PROSE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 306-19TH CENTURY II: BRITISH 

VICTORIAN POETRY AND PROSE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 307-20TH CENTURY BRITISH 

POETRY AND PROSE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 308-AMERICAN I: BEGINNINGS 
THROUGH COOPER. 

Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 309-AMERICAX II: EMERSON 

THROUGH TWAIN. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 310-AMERICAN III: RISE OF 

NATURALISM TO THE PRESENT. (5-0 5 

Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 320-BRITISH DRAMA: 
BEGINNINGS THROUGH 1750. 

Offered an demand. 

ENGLISH 322— MODERN BRITISH, AMERICAN, AND 

CONTINENTAL DRAMA: [SBEN TO THE PRESENT. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 



ENGLISH/LINGUISTICS 325-ADVANCED GRAMMAR. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

This is a study of current approaches to grammar (including generative- 
transformational); phonology, morphology and syntax will be studied. 

ENGLISH 327-WORLD LITERATURE I. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

A study of major works and movements in world literature through the 
Renaissance. 

ENGLISH 328-WORLD LITERATURE II. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 
A study of major works and movements in modern world literature. 

ENGLISH 329-INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY 

RESEARCH AND WRITING. (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. 

A course intended to increase the student's skill in gathering research 
materials and using bibliographies, to improve the style and mechanics of 
his scholarly papers and to familiarize him with literary terminology. 
Highly recommended for those majors who plan to teach or enter graduate 
school. 

ENGLISH 331-CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. (5-0-5) 

(Does not apply toward English major). Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 332-LITERATURE FOR ADOLESCENTS. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. (Does not apply toward the English major except 
for candidates for secondary teacher certification.) 

ENGLISH/LINGUISTICS 340-ADVANCED COMPOSITION. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: English 211 or consent of instructor 
(does not apply toward English major). 

The study of expository and report techniques. 

ENGLISH 342-CREATIVE WRITING. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: English 222 or consent of instructor . Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 400-SEMINAR. (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Topic to be announced as offered. Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 401-SEMINAR. (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Topic to be announced as offered. Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 405-CHAUCER. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 406-SHAKESPEARE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 407-MILTON. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 



ENGLISH/LINGUISTICS 410-HISTORY OF 
ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

ENGLISH 490-INDEPENDENT STUDY. (] 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Senior status and English 211. Op< n 
to transient students only with tin />< rmission ofthi Dean oj Faculty at 
Armstrong and the college from which tin student comes. 

ENGLISH 491— INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1 >-0-(l 5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Si nior status and English 211. <>/» >< 
to transient students only with tin permission ofthi Dean of Faculty at 
Armstrong and the college from which tin st,,<h ,,t comes. 

Foreign Language 

French 

FRENCH 101-102-103— ELEMENTARY 

FRENCH. 0-5) (5-0-5) (5 

Offered each year. 

A course for beginners. The approach is primarily oral, and daily prac- 
tice with tape recordings is required.* 

To receive credit for French 103, a student must successfully complete 
the appropriate national standardized tost. 

FRENCH 201-INTERMEDIATK FRENCH. (5 I 

Offered o)i demand. Prerequisite: three (//metres of college French <>r 
three years of high school French. 

Further reading of texts, and oral and composition practice. To receive 
credit for French 201, a student must pass the appropriate national stan- 
dardized test. 

FRENCH 300-COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION. 

Winter. Prerequisite; French 201. 

FRENCH 301-FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 

MIDDLE AGES AND THE RENAISSANCE. 

Offered on den/and. Prerequisite: French 201. 

FRENCH 302-FRENTH CLASSICAL DRAMA. 
Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Fn nch 201. 
Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. 

FRENCH 304-FRENCH LITERATURE OF 
THE 19TH CENTURY. 
Offered on demand. Prerequisite: French 201. 

A study of Romantic prose, poetry, and drama, with lectures and discus- 
sions in French. 

FRENCH 305— FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 
19TH CENTURY: REALISM AND NATURALISM. 
Offered on demand. Prerequisite: French 201. 

'Students who own tape machiru s may <■>>< <-k 
tapes are recorded at 7*fai.p.8. 



FRENCH 351-352-353-STUDY ABROAD 

IN FRANCE. k (15 hours credit). 

Prerequisite: French 103. 

This course is a summer quarter's residence and study in France in 
conjunction with the Study Abroad Program of the University System of 
Georgia. The program is offered in Dijon for a period of nine weeks. During 
this time the student will receive intensive instruction in language and 
culture and will be expected to engage in co-curricular activities sponsored 
by the University of Dijon and USG. 

FRENCH 401-FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 

TWENTIETH CENTURY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: French 201. 

This course is a study of contemporary prose, poetry, and drama with 
lectures and discussions in French. This course, normally the last course in 
French that a student would take, includes a serious term paper of consid- 
erable magnitude to be written in French. 

FRENCH 490-INDEPENDENT STUDY. (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Senior status and French 201 . Open 
to transient students only with permission of the Dean of Faculty at 
Armstrong and the college from, which the student comes. 

German 

GERMAN 101-102-103-ELEMENTARY 

GERMAN. (5-0-5) (5-0-5) (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. 

Elements of reading and writing: basic vocabulary; simple conversation; 
essentials of grammar.* To receive credit for German 103, a student must 
pass the appropriate national standardized test. 

GERMAN 201-INTERMEDIATE GERMAN. (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Three quarters of college German or three years of 

high school German. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. To receive 

credit for German 201, a student must pass the appropriate national 

standardized test. 

GERMAN 211-SCIENTIFIC GERMAN. (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Same as 201. 

Readings in scientific and technical material with special attention to 
grammatical difficulties encountered in this literature. 

GERMAN 300-COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: German 201. 



*Students who own tape machines may check copies of taped lessons out of the library. These 
tapes are recorded at 7V2.i.p.s. 



GERMAN 305-19TH CENTURY 

GERMAN LITERATURE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: German 201. 

GERMAN 307-20TH CENTURY 

GERMAN LITERATURE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: German 201. 

GERMAN 351-352-353— STUDY ABROAD 

IN GERMANY. (15 hours credit) 

Prerequisite: German 103. 

This course is a summer quarter's residence and study in Germany in 
conjunction with the Study Abroad Program of the University System of 
Georgia. The program is offered in Germany for a period of nine weeks. 
During this time the student will receive intensive instruction in language 
and culture and will participate in University sponsored activities. 

GERMAN 490-INDEPENDENT STUDY. (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Senior status and German 201. Open 
to transient student only with permission of the Dean of Faculty at 
Armstrong and the college from which the student comes. 

Latin 

LATIN 101-102-103-ELEMENTARY 

LATIN. (5-0-5) (5-0-5) (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. 

Essentials of grammar; readings from selected Latin authors. 

LATIN 201-INTERMEDIATE LATIN. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Further reading in Latin literature with special emphasis on Vergil and 
Ovid. 

Russian 

RUSSIAN 101-102-103-ELEMENTARY 

RUSSIAN. (5-0-5) (5-0-5) (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. 

These courses provide the student with the elements of Russian read- 
ing, composition, and conversation.* To receive credit for Russian 1 <>■"». a 
student must pass the appropriate national standardized test. 

RUSSIAN 201-INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN. (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Russian 103. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. To receive 
credit for Russian 201, a student must pass the appropriate national 
standardized tests. 



'Students who own tape machines may check copies of taped lessons out ofthe library. Th« 

tapes are recorded at 7V&i.p.s. 



Spanish 

SPANISH 101-102-103-ELEMENTARY 

SPANISH. (5-0-5) (5-0-5) (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. 

These courses provide the student with the elements of Spanish reading, 
composition,. and conversation.* To receive credit for Spanish 103, a stu- 
dent must pass the appropriate national standardized test. 

SPANISH 201 -INTERMEDIATE SPANISH. (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Three quarters of college Spanish or three years of 

high school Spanish. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. To receive 

credit for Spanish 201, a student must successfully pass the appropriate 

national standardized test. 

SPANISH 300-COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION. (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 . 

SPANISH 351-352-353-STUDY ABROAD 

IN SPAIN. (15 hours credit) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 103. 

This course is a summer quarter's residence and study in Spain in 
conjunction with the Study Abroad Program of the University System of 
Georgia. The program is offered in Salamanca for a period of nine weeks. 
During this time the students will receive intensive instruction in language 
and culture which will be complemented by a number of excursions. 

SPANISH 490-INDEPENDENT STUDY. (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Senior status and Spanish 201 . Open 
to transient students only with the permission of the Dean of Faculty at 
Armstrong and the college from, which the student comes. 

Journalism 

JOURNALISM 227-JOURNALISM LABORATORY. (0-3-1) 

Offered on demand. 

Practical experience in journalism. Students will work under instruction 
on the college newspaper staff. Only one hour's credit may be earned per 
quarter. The maximum total credit allowed in Journalism Laboratory is 
five quarter hours. Admission by permission of the instructor. 

JOURNALISM 340-See English 340. 

JOURNALISM 343-JOURNALISTIC WRITING. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: English 211. 

Investigation of and intensive practice in the techniques of modern 
journalism with emphasis on writing for newspapers and periodicals. 

JOURNALISM 347-See DrS 347. 



*Students who own tape machines may check copies of taped lessons out of the library. These 
tapes are recorded at 7V2i.p.s. 



JOURNALISM 350-See DrS 350. 

JOURNALISM 364-COPY EDITING AND LAYOUT. (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Journalism 3J/.0 or 343 or permission of instructor. 

This is an intensive workshop in preparing copy for the press. Emphasis 
is on editing, on rewriting, and on makeup of pages. 

JOURNALISM 400-TOPICS IN JOURNALISM. (3-0-3) 

This is a seminar on topics of interest and utility to journalists in all the 
media. Individual topics will be announced. The course may be taken for 
credit more than once as topics change. 

Linguistics 

LINGUISTICS 325-See English 325. 

LINGUISTICS 340-See English 340. 

LINGUISTICS 385-DIALECTS OF 

AMERICAN ENGLISH. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: English/ Linguistics -12.') or Speech 228. 

Investigates and describes major American dialects in terms of their 
phonology, morphology, lexicon, and syntax. Both geographic and social 
dialects are covered. 

LINGUISTICS 400-TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS. (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: English/ Linguistics 325 orUlO or Linguistics -is.', or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

A seminar in subjects of interest in both theoretical and applied linguis- 
tics. Topics will be announced, and the course may be taken more than once 
for credit as topics change. 

LINGUISTICS 410-See English 410. 

Philosophy 

Successful completion of English ill is prerequisite to oil Philosophy 

courses. 

PHILOSOPHY 200-NATURE, CULTURE, AND CHOICE. (5-0-5) 

Prerequ isite: English ill. 

The central notion is that man transforms nature into culture by means 
of symbol systems. The course asks what needs of human nature arc 
served thereby and what ethical consequences are involved. It stresses the 
assumptions and methods defining the humanities and science and. in 
ethics, focuses on professional issues. 

PHILOSOPHY 201-INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. (6-0-5) 

Offered o» demand. Prerequisite; English ill 

The fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning and function of philoso- 
phy, and the vocabulary and problems of philosophy. Includes a survey of 
the basic issues and major types of philosophy and shows their sources in 
experience, history, and representative thinker.-. 



PHILOSOPHY 301-HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY: 

ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL. % (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: English 111. 

An historical introduction to philosophy, tracing the development of 
European philosophy from the early Greeks through the Middle Ages, 
with emphasis on selected works of major philosophers. 

PHILOSOPHY 302-HISTORY OF 

PHILOSOPHY: MODERN. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: English 111. 

European philosophy from the Renaissance through Kant, emphasizing 
selected works of major philosophers. 

PHILOSOPHY 303-19TH AND 20TH CENTURY 

PHILOSOPHY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: English 111. Offered on demand. 

A study of the major philosophers in philosophical movements of the 
19th and 20th centuries. 

PHILOSOPHY 400-SPECIAL TOPICS. (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: one 200 or 300 level philosophy 
course. 

The specific subject matter in this course will be determined and an- 
nounced by the professor at the time when the course is offered. 

PHILOSOPHY 490-INDEPENDENT STUDY. (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Senior status and one 300-level Phi- 
losophy course. 

The student, with the advice and consent of his supervising professor 
and of the department head, will select the topic for supervised indepen- 
dent study and will submit a prospectus for department approval before 
the quarter in which the course is to be taken. Open to transient students 
only with permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Professor Richard M. Summerville, Head; Professor Emeritus Winn; 
Professors Hinkel and Hudson; Associate Professors Kilhefner, Munson, 
Netherton, and Shipley; Assistant Professors Findeis, Geoffroy, and 
Leska. 

The department offers four baccalaureate (four-year) programs of 
study, with each leading to the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in 
the mathematical sciences. Under this one baccalaureate degree designa- 
tion students may pursue concentrations entitled "Mathematics," "Ap- 
plied Mathematics," "Mathematics Education," and "Computer Science." 
The mathematics education concentration is specifically designed to pre- 
pare teachers of secondary mathematics and is an approved program for 



the Georgia Teacher's Professional Four- Year Certificate (T-4). The De- 
partment of Mathematics and Computer Science also participates in the 
Dual Degree Program of Armstrong State College and the Georgia Insti- 
tute of Technology, under which students may, in five years of study, earn 
simultaneously the B.S. degree in the mathematical sciences (applied 
mathematics) from Armstrong and the Bachelor's degree in any one of a 
number of fields of engineering from Georgia Tech. 

Students who wish to consider pursuing any of the above degree pro- 
grams should consult with the department head before their first quarter 
in residence for advisement and planning of their academic programs. 

Program for the Degree 

Bachelor of Science with a Major in the 

Mathematical Sciences 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* 96 

1. English 111, 112, 211 15 

2. One of the courses: 5 

Art 200, 271, 272, 273; English 222; 
Music 200; Philosophy 200, 201 

3. One of the sequences: 10 

Biology 101-102; Chemistry 128-129 (required for 
dual degree students); Physics 217-218 

4. History 114, 115, and either 251 or 252 15 

5. Political Science 113 5 

6. One of the courses: 5 

Psychology 101 (required for the concentration 
in Mathematics Education), Sociology 201, 
Economics 201, or Anthropology 201 

7. Mathematics 101, 103, 104, 201, 202, 203 30 

8. Computer Science 110 5 

9. Physical Education 103 or 108, 117, and three 

activities courses 6 

B. Courses in the Major Field 55 

Each student majoring in the mathematical sciences must select 

one of the following four options and complete its requirements: 

OPTION ONE - MATHEMATICS: 

1. Mathematics 260, 311, 316, and either 312 or 317 16 

2. Mathematics 401, 402 - 

3. Approved mathematics electives (300-400 level) 16 

4. One foreign language or computer science sequence 15 

OPTION TWO - APPLIED MATHEMATICS: 

1. Mathematics 2(10. 316, 341, and either 342 or 353 17-18 

2. Computer Science 140' or 241 6 

3. Physics 217. 21s, 219; or Mathematics 321, 

322, 346, and Computer Science 325 18 

4. Approved mathematics electives (300-400 level) 15-1 J 

•Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission" 

section of this Bulletin. 



Quarter Hours 
OPTION THREE - MATHEMATICS EDUCATION: 

1. Mathematics 220, 260, 311, 316, 336 22 

2. Approved mathematics electives (300-400 level) 8 

3. Psychology 301 5 

4. Education 203, 330, 441, and Special Education 205 20 

OPTION FOUR - COMPUTER SCIENCE: 

1. Computer Science 241, 301, 302, 306 20 

2. Two courses from Computer Science 345, 401, 431 10 

3. Mathematics 260, and either Mathematics 220 or 321 10 

4. Approved electives in computer science, at most one of which 
may be selected from among C.S. 136, C.S. 146, C.S. 225 15 

C. Related Field Requirements 15 

In addition to the above requirements, each student majoring in 

the mathematical sciences must complete fifteen quarter hours of 
approved courses in one field of study related to his major. 
Students completing the major requirements under option one 
may not use the same field to meet this requirement as was used 
to meet requirement (4) of the major. Students completing the 
major requirements under option three must meet this 
requirement through student teaching (Education 446, 447, 448). 

D. Approved electives 25 

E. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

Minor Concentration 

The department offers a minor in Computer Science. The minor requires 
25 hours with an average grade of "C" or better. The student will take 
Computer Science 110, 231 or 241, 301, 306, and five quarter hours of 
additional approved coursework in Computer Science. 

Course Offerings 
Mathematics 

MATHEMATICS 101-COLLEGE ALGEBRA. (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: A student must have 
attained at least one of the following prior to enrolling: (a) a score of at 
least 4,20 on the mathematics portion of the SAT; or (b) a score of at least 20 
on the Mathematics Diagnostic Test; or (c) a grade of"P" in Mathematics 
099. Dates on which the Mathematics Diagnostic Test is administered are 
given in the academic calendar in the front of the catalogue. Present text: 
Swokowski, Fundamentals of College Algebra. 

Real number arithmetic; polynomial and rational expressions; linear and 
quadratic equations; functions and graphs; inequalities; absolute value; 
sequences and progressions; the binomial theorem; techniques of counting 
and elementary probability. (May be exempted by examination with aca- 
demic credit awarded.) 



MATHEMATICS 103-PRE-CALCULUS MATHEMATICS. (5-0-5) 
Fall, Winter, Sprint/, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or /» ■/■- 
mission of the department head. Present text: Flanders and Price, Intro- 
ductory College Mathematics with Linear Algebra and Finite Mathe- 
matics. 

Functions; polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic- 
functions; mathematical induction; complex numbers; matrices, determi- 
nants, and systems of equations. (May be exempted by examination with 
academic credit awarded.) 

MATHEMATICS 104-CALCULUS I. (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 103 or pi r- 

mission of the department head. Present text: Leithold, The Calculus with 

Analytic Geometry. 

Functions; limits; continuity; the derivative and its applications. (May 

be exempted by examination with academic credit awarded.) 

MATHEMATICS 195-APPLIED FINITE MATHEMATICS 

WITH CALCULUS. (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101. 
Present text: Lial and Miller, Mathematics: with Applications in the 
Management, Natural, and Social Sciences. 

A survey of elementary analytic, linear, and finite mathematics as they 
relate to commerce, business, and life situations. 

MATHEMATICS 201-CALCULUS II. (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 10£. 

Present text: Leithold, The Calculus with Analytic Geometry. 

The Riemann integral and its applications; differential and integral 
calculus of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; tech- 
niques of integration. (May be exempted by examination with academic 
credit awarded.) 

MATHEMATICS 202-CALCULUS III. (5 I 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201. 

Present text: Leithold, The Calculus with Analytic Geometry. 

Polar coordinates; conic sections; hyperbolic functions; indeterminate 
forms; improper integrals; Taylor's formula; infinite seri< 

MATHEMATICS 203— CALCULUS IV. (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Matin unities 202. 
Present text: Leithold, The Calculus with Analytic Geometry. 

Two and three dimensional vectors; parametric equations; solid analytic- 
geometry; differential calculus of several variables; multiple integration; 
line integrals. 

MATHEMATICS 220— ELEMENTARY STATISTICS. (5 I 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Matin < natics 101. 

Present text: Freund, Statistics: A First Course. 

Measures of central tendency and dispersion; probability distributions; 
inferences concerning means, standard deviations, and proportions; anal- 



ysis of variance; correlation; regression. (May be exempted by examina- 
tion with academic credit awarded.) 

MATHEMATICS 260-LOGIC, PROOF, AND SET THEORY. (5-0-5) 
Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201 . Present text: Lin and Lin, 

Set Theory: An Intuitive Approach. 

Elementary logic; naive set theory; relations and functions; Boolean 

algebras; ordering relations. 

MATHEMATICS 290-TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS. (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101. 

Present text: Wimbish, Mathematics: A Humanistic Approach. 

A terminal course of selected topics designed to portray the history, 

philosophy, and aesthetics of mathematics, and to develop an appreciation 

of the role of mathematics in western thought and contemporary culture. 

MATHEMATICS 311-312-ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I, II. 

311 - (U-O-U) - Fall (even years); 312 - (3-0-3) - Winter (odd years). 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 260. Present text: Hillman and Alexander son, 
A First Undergraduate Course in Abstract Algebra. 

Classical topics in the elementary theory of groups, rings, and fields. 

MATHEMATICS 316-317-LINEAR ALGEBRA I, II. 

316 - (U-O-U) - Winter; 317 - (3-0-3) - Spring. Prerequisites: Mathe- 
matics 203 (may be taken concurrently) and Mathematics 260. Present 
texts: Kolman, Elementary Linear Algebra; and Rorres and Anton, Ap- 
plications of Linear Algebra. 

Linear systems; vector spaces and linear transformations; matrices; 
determinants; normed linear spaces and inner product spaces. 

MATHEMATICS 321-322-PROBABILITY AND MATHEMATICAL 
STATISTICS I, II. 

321 - (5-0-5) - Fall (even years); 322 - U-O-V - Winter (odd years). 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 203 (may be taken concurrently). Present text: 
Freund, Mathematical Statistics. 

Probability spaces; random variables; algebra of expectation; random 
sampling; the law of large numbers; correlation and regression. 

MATHEMATICS 336-337-MODERN GEOMETRY I, II. 

336 - (U-O-U) - Fall (odd years); 337 - (3-0-3) - Winter (even years). 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 260. Present text: Ewald, Geometry: An Intro- 
duction. 

A survey of selected topics from Euclidean, spherical, projective, and 
finite geometry. 

MATHEMATICS 341-342-DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 1, 11.(4-0-4 
each) 

SU1 - Winter; 3U2 - Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 203. Present 
text:Boyce andDePrima, Elementary Differential Equations and Bound- 
ary Value Problems. 

Ordinary differential equations; series solutions; systems of first order 
differential equations; the Laplace transform; introduction to Fourier 



series; partial differential equations; Sturm-Liouville theory; applied 
problems. 

MATHEMATICS 346— MATHEMATICAL MODELING 

AND OPTIMIZATION. (4-0-4 1 

Spring (even years). Prerequisite: Mathematics 208. Present text: 
Cooper, Bhat and LeHlanc, Introduction to Operations Research Models. 
Design, solution, and interpretation of mathematical models for prob- 
lems in the social, life, and management sciences. Topics chosen from 
linear programming, dynamic programming, scheduling theory, Markov- 
chains, game theory, queueing theory, and inventory theory. 

MATHEMATICS 353-NUMERICAL ANALYSIS. (5-0-5) 

Summer (even years). Prerequisites: Mathematics 208 and Computer 

Science 110. Present text: Conte and deBoor, Elementary Numerical 

Analysis. 

Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; systems of linear equations; 

numerical integration and numerical solution of differential equations; 

matrix inversion; evaluation of determinants; calculation of eigenvalues 

and eigenvectors; boundary value problems. 

MATHEMATICS 360-MATHEMATICAL LOGIC. (3-0-3) 

Spring (odd gears). Prerequisite: Mathematics 260. Present text: 
Hunter, Metalogic: An Introduction to the Metatheory of Standard First 
Order Logic. 

The elementary statement and predicate calculus; formal systems; ap- 
plications of logic in mathematics. 

MATHEMATICS 391-BASIC IDEAS OF ARITHMETIC. 0-5) 

Winter, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101. Present text: Cope- 
land, Mathematics and the Elementary Teacher. 

Fundamental concepts of arithmetic as they relate to the elementary 
school; current elementary school methods and materials used in arithme- 
tic instruction. (Credit will not apply toward a degree in the mathematical 
sciences.) 

MATHEMATICS 392-BASIC IDEAS OF GEOMETRY. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Mathematics S91 . Presi nt text: Haag, 

Hardgrove, and Hill, Elementary Geometry. 

Fundamental concepts of geometry as they relate to the elementary 
school; current elementary school methods and materials used in geometry 
instruction. (Credit will not apply toward a degree in the mathematical 
sciences.) 

MATHEMATICS 400-PUTNAM SEMINAR. (0-2-1 1 

Fall. Prerequisites: Mathematics 208, 260. 

A variety of mathematical problems, considered with the aim of develop- 
ing problem solving techniques. 

MATHEMATICS 401-402— ADVANCED CALCULUS I, II ach) 

hOl - Fall (odd gears): [02 - Winter (even years). Prerequ 

Mathematics 208, 260. Present text: Sagan, Advanced Calculus. 



The real number system; sequences; limits of functions; the Bolzano- 
Weierstrass theorem; compactness; uniform continuity; the derivative; 
the Riemann integral; Euclidean n-space, sequences of functions, the 
Weierstrass approximation theorem; series; elementary functions. 

MATHEMATICS 406-FUNCTIONS OF A 

COMPLEX VARIABLE. (5-0-5) 

Summer (odd years). Prerequisites: Mathematics 203, 260. Present 
text: Churchill, Complex Variables with Applications. 

Complex numbers; elementary functions and transformations; the 
Cauchy theory; conformal mapping; Riemann's mapping theorem. 

MATHEMATICS 416-THEORY OF NUMBERS. (3-0-3) 

Fall (odd years). Prerequisites: Mathematics 203, 260. Present text: 
Adams and Goldstein, Introduction to Number Theory. 

Divisibility and congruence; quadratic reciprocity; diophantine equa- 
tions; number-theoretic functions and their applications; selected ad- 
vanced topics from algebraic and analytic number theory. 

MATHEMATICS 436-TOPOLOGY. (3-0-3) 

Spring (even years). Prerequisite: Mathematics U01 . Present text: Du- 
gundji, Topology. 

Topological spaces and homeomorphisms; separability; compactness; 
connectedness; completeness; metrizability; introduction to homotopy the- 
ory. 

MATHEMATICS 470-HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS. (3-0-3) 

Fall (even years). Prerequisites: Mathematics 203 and six quarter 
hours of 300-4.00 level courses in mathematics. Present text: Eves, An 
Introduction to the History of Mathematics. 

A survey of the development of mathematics from its empirical begin- 
nings to its present state. 

MATHEMATICS 490-SPECIAL TOPICS. ((l-5)-0-(l-5)). 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor 
and permission of department head. 

Individual readings and research under the direction of a member of the 
mathematics faculty. 

MATHEMATICS 496-497-498-INTERNSHIP IN 

MATHEMATICS. ((0-l)-(12-15)-5 each) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: Permission of the depart- 
ment head. 

Experience, in a variety of mathematical applications suited to the 
educational and professional aspirations of the student, under the direction 
of the faculty and appropriate off-campus supervisory personnel. (Open to 
transient students only with permission of the Dean of Faculty at Arm- 
strong and that of the appropriate official of the college from which the 
student comes.) 



Computer Science 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 110-INTRODUCTION TO 

COMPUTING. (4 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101. 
Present text: Bent and Sethares, BASIC: An Introduction to Computer 
Programming. 

BASIC programming and program structure; elementary logic and 
Boolean algebra; algorithms; How charts; debugging; computer solutions 
of numeric and non-numeric problems; characteristics and applications of 
computers in modern society. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 136-RPG PROGRAMMING. (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Computer Science 110. Present text: Shell// ami 

Cashman, Introduction to Computer Programming — RPG. 

Introduction to the language and programming applications for small 

computer systems using RPG. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 146-FORTRAN PROGRAMMING. (3-4-5) 
Summer. Prerequisite: Computer Science 110. Present text: Gottfried, 

Programming with FORTRAN IV. 

FORTRAN syntax, arrays, input/output, subroutines, programming 
techniques. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 225-STATISTICAL PROGRAMMING FOR 
THE SOCIAL SCIENCES. (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: Mathematics 220 and Computer Science 110. 
Present text: Nie, et.al.. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. 

Uses of computers in statistical analysis, including the study of statisti- 
cal methods, the programming of statistical analyses, and data analysis 
using packaged systems. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 231 -PROGRAMMING PRINCIPLES 
WITH COBOL. (3-4-5) 

Winter, Summer. Prerequisite: Computer Science 110. Prist, it texts: 
Murach, Standard COBOL; and Chaiand Chai, Programming Standard 

COBOL. 

The COBOL programming language: basic syntax, input/output, de- 
bugging, table-handling, sorting, searching, sequential file manipulation; 
structured programming for COBOL; JCL for COBOL programs. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 241 -PROGRAMMING PRINCIPLES 
WITH PL/1. (3-4-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisites: Mathematics 103 ami CompuU r ScU >><■> 
110. Present text: Hughes, PL/1 Structured Programming. 

The PL/1 programming language: basic syntax, input/output, debug- 
ging, array structures, non-numeric processing, sequential file manipula- 
tion; structured programming for PL/1; JCL for PL/1 programs. 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 301-COMPUTER ORGANIZATION 

AND PROGRAMMING. > (4-3-5) 

Winter, Summer. Prerequisite: Computer Science 231 or Computer 
Science 21+1. Present text: Kuo, Assembler Language for FORTRAN, 
COBOL, and PL/1 Programmers. 

Introduction to systems programming via in-depth coverage of as- 
sembler programming; operating systems; addressing techniques, inter- 
nal storage structure; machine-level representation of instructions and 
data; subroutines; I/O; linkers and loaders; macro-facilities; mass data 
storage facilities. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 302-DATA STRUCTURES. (4-3-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Computer Science 24-1 , 301. Present text: Tremblay 
and Sorenson, An Introduction to Data Structures with Applications. 

Internal representation of arrays, queues, trees, stacks, and lists; hard- 
ware characteristics of large computer systems; concepts related to the 
interaction between data structures and storage structures for the 
generating, developing, and processing of data. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 306-DATA AND 

PROGRAMMING MANAGEMENT. (3-4-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Computer Science 231 or Computer Science 
2^1. Present texts: Shelly and Cashman, OS Job Control Language; and 
Brown, System/360 Job Control Language. 

Indexed sequential, direct, relative files; programs involving file manip- 
ulations in COBOL or PL/1; utility programs; partitioned data sets; proce- 
dure libraries; JCL required for the aforementioned topics. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 325-SYSTEM SIMULATION. (3-4-5) 

Spring (odd years). Prerequisites: Computer Science 110, Mathematics 

203, and either Mathematics 220 or Mathematics 321 . Text: To be selected. 

(formerly C.S. 320) 

The use of random number generators and the statistical evaluation of 

their output; simulation theory and techniques; elementary simulations; a 

simulation language or advanced simulations. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 331-SYSTEMS ANALYSIS 

AND DESIGN. (4-3-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: Co?nputer Science 301, 306. Present texts: Li, 
Design and Management of Information Systems; and Semprevivo, Sys- 
tems Analysis: Definition, Process, and Design, (formerly C.S. 432) 

Principles and techniques of systems analysis, including personnel and 
machine requirements, file considerations, problem formulation, analysis 
aids, iterative requirements of the design phase, and implementation 
criteria and evaluation; readings and case studies related to analysis and 
design, and a student project incorporating the techniques studied in an 
appropriate real-world environment. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 342-COMPARATIVE LANGUAGES.(3-4-5) 

Winter (even years). Prerequisite: Computer Science 241 . Present text: 
Peterson, Introduction to Programming Languages, (formerly C.S. 242) 



Comparative study of programming languages including facilities for 
recursion, procedures, storage allocation techniques, string processing, 

and passing of parameters. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 345— PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES: 

THEORY AND DESIGN. I 1-3-5) 

Spring(even years). Prerequisites: Computer Scu na 302,842. Pn 
text: Pratt, Programming Languages: Design and Implementation, (for- 
merly C.S. Shi) 

Formal definition of programming languages: specification of syntax and 
semantics; precedence rules for operators; translation between infix, pre- 
fix, and postfix notations; subroutines and coroutines; block structures; list 
structures; string structures. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 353-NUMERICAL ANALYSIS. (5-0-5) 

Summer (even years). Prerequisites: Mathematics 203 and Computer 

Science 110. Present text: Conte and deBoor, Elementary Numerical 
Analysis. 

Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; systems of linear equations; 
numerical integration and numerical solution of differential equations; 
matrix inversion; evaluation of determinants; calculation of eigenvalues 
and eigenvectors; boundary value problems. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 401-SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING I. 1 1 
Winter (odd years). Prerequisite: Computer Science 302. Present text: 

Habermann, Introduction to Operating System Design. 

Software requirements for support of computer systems, especially in a 
multi-programmed environment; addressing techniques; file system or- 
ganization and management, I/O; control systems; spooling; interrupts; 
reentrant code; user services; executive systems. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 431-CONTROL AND 

ORGANIZATION OF INFORMATION. (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: Computer Science 302, 306. Present text: Mar- 
tin, Computer and Data Rase Organization. 

Information analysis and logical design of information systems and data 
bases; consideration of hardware, access methods, management and con- 
trol functions, communicating with the data base, and integrated systems. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 490-SPECIAL TOPICS IN- 
COMPUTER SCIENCE. ((0-5M0-15MM5)). 
Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: ( 'oust ntofthi instructor 

and permission of the depart mint head. 

Individual or group readings and research under the direction of a 

member of the faculty. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 496-497-498- INTERNSHIP 

IN COMPUTER SCIENCE. ((0-lM12-15)-5 each). 

Offered by special arrangement. Pn requisite: Pi rmissionofthi depart- 
ment head. 

Experience, in a variety of computing environments suited to the educa- 
tional and professional aspirations of the student, under the direction of a 



member of the faculty and appropriate off-campus supervisory personnel. 
(Open to transient students only with permission Qf the Dean of Faculty at 
Armstrong and that of the appropriate official of the college from which the 
student comes.) 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor C. Stewart Worthington, Head; Associate Professors 
Douglass, Lane; Assistant Professors Palefsky, Patchak, and O'Higgins. 

Students are advised to complete as many of the general degree require- 
ments as possible before entering their junior years. Psychology majors 
should take Psychology 101-220 before the end of their sophomore years. 
Suggested course distributions and annual schedules are available in the 
department office. All students are urged to seek advisement with regard 
to degree requirements and scheduling. 

Program for the Degree 
Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Psychology 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* 65 

1. English 111, 112, 211, and choice of: 20 

English 222 or Philosophy 200, 201 

2. Mathematics 101 and choice of: 10 

Mathematics 195 or 290 

3. History 114, 115 and choice of: : 15 

History 251 or 252 

4. Political Science 113 5 

5. One of the following sequences: ' 10 

Chemistry 128, 129; Physics 211, 212; 
Physical Science 121, 122 

6. Anthropology 201 or Sociology 201 5 

B. Courses in Major Field 50 

1. Psychology 220, 307, 308, 309, 312, 410, 411, 412 40 

2. Two of the following: 10 

Psychology 303, 305, 311 

C. Related Field Requirements 30 

1. Biology 101, 102 and Mathematics 220 15 

2. Foreign language sequence or 

computer science sequence 15 

D. Electives 40-55 

1. Upper division courses in anthropology, biology, chemistry, 
criminal justice, mathematics, psychology, sociology, or 

social work 15-30 

2. Unspecified electives 25 

E. Physical Education 103 or 108 and 117 and three 

activities courses 6 

F. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191-206 



^Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credits awarded. See "Admission" 
section of this Bulletin. 



Program f or Secondary School Teachers 

of Social Sciences 

( Behavioral Sciences) 

Qmirtt r Hon rs 

A. General Requirements* 71 

1. English 111, 112, 211, and choice of: 20 

English 222 or Philosophy 200, 201 

2. Mathematics 101 and choice of: 1<> 

Mathematics Hi.") or 290 

3. History 114, 115 and choice of: 15 

History 251 or 252 

4. Political Science 113 5 

5. One of the following sequences: 1<» 

Physics 211. 212; Physical Science 121. 122 

6. Anthropology 201 or Sociology 2(>l 5 

7. Physical Education 103 or 108 and 117 and three 

activities courses 6 

B. Courses in Psychology 55 

Psychology 220, 301, 303, 307, 308, 309, 311. 
312, 410. 411. 412 

C. Courses in Related Fields 30 

1. Biology 101, 102 and Mathematics 220 15 

2. Anthropology 300 or 450 5 

3. Sociology 201 and Sociology 350 or 450 1<> 

I). Electives .' ' 5-10 

To be chosen from Psvchologv 4<>5, 406; 
Social Work 320 

E. Professional Sequence 35 

1. Education 203. 331) 440. 440. 447. 448 3<» 

2. Special Education 205 5 

F. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196-201 



Minor Concentrations 

The department offers the following minors: 

The minor in Psychology requires 20 quarter hours of upper division 
work with grades of "C" or better. 

The minor in Mental Health Work requires 25 hours: Mental Health 
Work 201, 202, 203. 204, and Psychology 405 or 406. 

Course Offerings 

Anthropology 

ANTHROPOLOGY 201— MAN AND HIS CULTURE. (5-0-6) 

Fall. Offered on den/and. 

An introduction to the study of man as a cultural animal, the develop- 
ment of human societies from preliterate beginnings, the rise of complex 
social organizations with an outline study of the major cultures developed 
by man. 



^Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded ission' 

section of this Bulletin. 



ANTHROPOLOGY 300-PALEOANTHROPOLOGY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201. Spring. 

A survey of the data that illuminates the evolution of man. The major 
prehuman and human species, their ecology and cultures, will be dis- 
cussed. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 305-ETHNOLOGY OF 

NORTH AMERICA. (5-0-5) 

Cultural areas of North America (excluding Mexico), emphasizing cul- 
tural differences related to ecological factors; a look at origins, distribu- 
tion, and interrelations of native American cultures. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 310-ANTHROPOLOGY OF 

WOMEN AND MEN. (5-0-5) 

An examination of the social and cultural conditions that are the deter- 
minants and expressions of sex roles, based on cross cultural data from 
various cultures, ranging from foraging bands to complex society. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 450-INDEPENDENT STUDY. (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

By invitation of the professor. Offered on demand. Open to transient 
students only with permission of the Dean of the Faculty at Armstrong 
and the college from which the student comes. 

Mental Health Work 

MENTAL HEALTH WORK 101-INTRODUCTION 

TO MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS. (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

Survey of mental health facilities and institutions. Survey of history of 
mental health movement. Description of services provided, clients served, 
and administrative structure with emphasis on mental health agencies in 
Georgia. 

MENTAL HEALTH WORK 201-FOUNDATIONS OF 
BEHAVIORAL CHANGE. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: M.H.W. 101. Spring. 

Survey of theories of personality and behavior changing techniques 
arising from them. Emphasis on learning theory and environmental influ- 
ences. Introduction to research methodology. 

MENTAL HEALTH WORK 202-FOUNDATIONS OF 
BEHAVIOR ASSESSMENT. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: M.H.W. 101. Winter. 

Objective observation is emphasized, accurate recording of behavioral 
observations; collection and use of interview data; introduction to case 
study methods; use of reference in assessment. 

MENTAL HEALTH WORK 203-204-PRACTICUM. 

(5 credit hours each) 

Prerequisite: Mental Health Work 101, 201 , 202. 

The student will work a minimum of 12 hours per week in a community 
agency for a period of two quarters under the supervision of a professional 



employed by the agency. The student will also attend a one-hour seminar 
each week to discuss his agency experiences. Open to transient students 
only with permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes. 

Psychology 

PSYCHOLOGY 101-GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to the vocabulary, concepts, and methods of the science 
of behavior. Discussion and demonstrations assist in surveying all the 
areas of psychology. Psychology 101 is prerequisite to all other courses in 
the department. 

PSYCHOLOGY 220-INTRODUCTION TO 

PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH. (4-2-5) 

Pre req u is ite: Psych ology l 01 . 

An introduction to scientific methodology and its application to behavior 
analysis. Various techniques of data collection and the statistical analysis 
of such data are emphasized. 

PSYCHOLOGY 301-EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. . (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Offered each quarter. 
The application of behavioral science to the problem of learning in the 
classroom. Primarily for teacher preparation. 

PSYCHOLOGY 303-SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

The study of the behavior of others as determinants of the behavior of 
the individual. The cultural milieu and group pressures will be examined in 
terms of their effect on behavior. 

PSYCHOLOGY 305-DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

A study of the origin and development of psychological processes. The 
effects of maturational, learning, and social variables on human behavior 
are examined. 

PSYCHOLOGY 307-PERCEPTION. I 2-5). 

Prerequisites: Psychology 101 , 220. 

An experimental-theoretical approach to the nature of perception. Spe- 
cial attention is given to the psychological method. 

PSYCHOLOGY 308-LEARNING AND MOTIVATION. I 1 2 

Prerequisites: Psychology 101, 220. 

An examination of the methodology and theory associated with the 
various forms of learning and their motivational concomitants. 

PSYCHOLOGY 309-PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY. I !-:_'-:>> 

Prerequisites: Psychology 101, Biology 101-102. 

Introduction to the biological bases of behavior. The structure and 
function of the nervous system are studied and related to the behavior of 
humans and other organisms. 



PSYCHOLOGY 311-THEORIES OF PERSONALITY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

A study of selected personality theories with emphasis on normal behav- 
ior. Attention will be given to both experimental and clinical data. The 
determinants of personality structure and the development of personality 
will be examined from divergent points of view. 

PSYCHOLOGY 312-MEASUREMENT. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 220. 

An examination of the theory of measurement. Reliability and validity 
techniques are discussed, using current psychological tests as examples. 

PSYCHOLOGY 319-ANIMAL BEHAVIOR. (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: Psychology 101, 220. 

A study of the adaptations and behaviors with which living organisms 
cope effectively with their environment. The laboratory will provide an 
introduction to animal care, training, and experimentation. 

PSYCHOLOGY 320-INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

The applications of psychology to the problems of industry. Primarily for 
business majors. 

PSYCHOLOGY 405-BEHAVIOR DISORDERS. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

A study of the scientific and cultural bases of various conceptions of 
undesirable behavior. Application of principles derived from basic re- 
search will be emphasized. 

PSYCHOLOGY 406-BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Psychology 101. 

A study of proven methods of generating behavioral change, their 
empirical foundations, and their applications in clinical, educational and 
social settings. 

PSYCHOLOGY 410-HISTORY AND 

SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY. (5-0-5) 

Open only to psychology majors or by invitation of the professor. 

A study of the basic ideas in psychology from early animism to modern 
behavioristics. Special attention is given to the philosophical basis at 
various times in the history of psychology. 

PSYCHOLOGY 411-SENIOR SEMINAR (5-0-5) 

Open only to senior psychology majors or by invitation of the professor. 
A reading and discussion group which will concentrate on selected 

contemporary issues in psychology. Specific content will vary from year to 

year. 



PSYCHOLOGY 412-SENIOR SEMINAR. (5-0-5) 

Open only to senior psychology majors or by invitation of the professor. 

Spring. 

A reading and discussion group which will concentrate on selected 
contemporary issues in psychology. Specific content will vary from year to 
year. 

PSYCHOLOGY 450— INDEPENDENT STUDY. (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Open only by imitation of the professor, offered on demand. Open to 

transient students only with permission of the Drat/ of Faculty at Arm- 
strong and the college from which the st/nlent comes. 



X. School of Education 

Charles R. Nash, Dean 

Professors Harmond, Sims, W. Stokes, Burgess, Gadsden, Newberry, 
Sartor, Sumner, and Ward; Associate Professors Agyekum, Blalock, 
Bland, Cochran, Lawson, Robinson, Stephens, M. Stokes, and Tapp; 
Assistant Professors Ball, Bedwell, Bianchi, Black, Clayton, Ford, Knorr, 
White, and Thomas; Instructor Lariscy; Teaching Associate Burns. 



General Information 

The School of Education consists of three departments — the Depart- 
ment of Elementary Education (Dr. Thelma M. Harmond, Head); the 
Department of Physical Education and Athletics (Dr. Roy Sims, Head); 
and the Department of Secondary Education (Dr. William Stokes, Head). 
As a result of the approval by the Department of Health, Education, and 
Welfare of the Georgia Plan for the Further Desegregation of the Univer- 
sity System in early 1979, all Teacher Education programs were trans- 
ferred from Savannah State College to Armstrong State College, effective 
September, 1979. As of that date, Savannah State College no longer offers 
degree programs in Teacher Education. 

Degree Programs Offered 

Armstrong State College is currently authorized by the Board of Re- 
gents of the University System of Georgia to offer the following baccalau- 
reate degree programs in Teacher Education: 

Bachelor of Science in Education with majors in Art Education; Early 
Elementary Education; Middle School Education; Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation 

Bachelor of Music Education 

Bachelor of Arts in English, History, Political Science, Psychology 
(Behavioral Science) with programs for teacher certification at the 
secondary level 

Bachelor of Science in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematical Sciences with 
programs for teacher certification at the secondary level 

Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in Secondary Education in 
the teaching fields of General Science Education, French Education, 
Industrial Arts Education, Physics Education, Social Studies Educa- 
tion, Spanish Education, Trade and Industrial Education. All pro- 
grams in this category have been transferred to Armstrong State 
College from Savannah State College. For information concerning 
their current status, the student should check with the Head of the 
Department of Secondary and Special Education or with the Dean of 
the School of Education. 

The college also offers an Associate Library Media Specialist program 
which may consitute an area of concentration for elementary teachers 

146 



and an endorsement on the certificate for secondary teachers. The 
program is also intended to create an interest in lihrarianship. The 
courses are Library Science 310, 320, 410, and 4^0 (20 quarter hours 
credit). 
All Teacher Education programs are approved by the Georgia State 
Department of Education. Upon verification by the College that the stu- 
dent has completed successfully an approved program, the student applies 
to the State Department of Education for the appropriate certificate. 

Transfer Students — Savannah State College 

Teacher Education students who transfer to Armstrong State College 
from Savannah State College in the program exchange being implemented 
as part of the State Desegregation Plan and who will be able to complete 
their programs by August, 1980, may elect to receive their degrees from 
Armstrong or Savannah State College. If the student elects to receive the 
degree from Savannah State College, he/she must pursue the curriculum 
track for the appropriate program as identified in a supplement to this 
Bulletin. Course descriptions appear in the 1978-79 edition of the Savan- 
nah State College Bulletin and General Catalog. If he/she elects to receive 
the degree from Armstrong State College, he/she must meet the Arm- 
strong requirements for that degree. The transfer student from Savannah 
State College who will complete the requirements for the degree after 
August, 1980, must complete the appropriate Armstrong requirements. 
Any courses taken by the student at Savannah State College which are 
reasonably equivalent to courses required at Armstrong will substitute for 
these required courses. It is important that each student in a Teacher 
Education program meet with his/her assigned advisor early in the fall 
quarter and during each subsequent quarter to develop an approved 
program of studies and to make certain that he/she is meeting the require- 
ments leading toward the appropriate degree. 

Program Transfer — Transition Period 

The 1979-1980 academic year and summer, 1980 will serve as the period 
of transition for the transfer of Teacher Education programs from Savan- 
nah State College to Armstrong State College. Effective Fall Quarter, 
1980, a single curriculum track for each Teacher Education program will be 
in place. 

General Requirements 
Teacher Education Programs 

These requirements apply to all students in Teacher Education pro- 
grams at the Early Elementary, Middle School, or Secondary levels. 



Recommendation for Certificate 

To be recommended for a teaching certificate, a student must complete 
at Armstrong State College a majority of his courses in the following areas: 
the professional sequence, the teaching field, and the related field. 

Program, Completion 

A student must complete the college approved program for certification 
within the four years following his/her admission to the Teacher Education 
program. In the event that the student does not complete his program in 
four years, he/she must meet the requirements of the program in effect at 
that time. 

NTE Requirement 

All students completing Teacher Education programs are required to 
take both the Common Examinations and the appropriate Teaching Area 
Examination of the National Teacher Examinations. Students must sub- 
mit the scores from these examinations to the School of Education before 
the college can verify that an approved program has been completed. 
Additional information about these tests can be secured from the Office of 
Counseling and Placement. 

Academic Advisement 

A student who desires to become an elementary or secondary school 
teacher should apply during the first quarter of residence to the School of 
Education for academic advisement. He should follow without deviation 
the approved program. Upon admission to Teacher Education, students 
will be assigned advisors as follows: 

1. Early Elementary and Middle School education majors are assigned 
an advisor in the Department of Elementary Education who will 
assist the student in planning the total program of studies. 

2. Students pursuing secondary or all level programs will be assigned an 
advisor in the Department of Secondary Education to assist them 
concerning the professional sequence courses and certification re- 
quirements. In addition, students will have an advisor in the teaching 
field major to approve the courses in the teaching field. Assignment 
of the teaching field advisor will be made by the head of the academic 
department offering the major. Each student must have his second- 
ary teaching program approved in advance by both advisors. Special 
forms for this purpose are to be filed with each advisor and a copy 
given to the student. 

Admission to Teacher Education 

All students pursuing a program leading toward certification by the 
Georgia State Department of Education as teachers must apply for admis- 
sion to the Teacher Education program at Armstrong State College. This 
application will normally be filed during the third quarter of the sophomore 

148 



year or, for transfer students, in the first quarter of the junior year. 
Application forms may be secured from the office of the I )ean of the School 
of Education. The following criteria are used in admitting applicants to 
teacher education. 

1. Completion of at least (>() quarter hours of college credit with a 2.50 
GPA and completion of Education 203 and English 111, 112, and 211 
or their equivalents with a "C" or better. 

2. Satisfactory completion of the Regents Examination. 

3. Competence in oral and written expression. 

4. Indication of desirable attitude, character, and teaching potential. 

5. Statement of good health signed by a licensed physician. 

September Practicum 

The purpose of the September Practicum is to provide an opportunity 

for future teachers (1) to learn what teachers do at the beginning of a new 
school team, (2) to participate in experiences that will assist the prospec- 
tive teacher with future decisions concerning teaching as a career, and 
(3) to become acquainted with the organization and curriculum of a partic- 
ular school. 

The September Practicum occurs during the first two weeks of the 
public school term (usually in late August and early September) and should 
be scheduled during the student's junior or senior year. No credit is given 
for the September Practicum, but it is ^requirement in all of the teaching 
fields in the Armstrong State College Teacher Education Program. 

Application for the September Practicum should be made during the 
first week of the Spring Quarter for a September Practicum in the forth- 
coming September. The student should contact the Dean of the School of 
Education. 

Student Teachi)tg 

Student teaching, the culminating activity of the professional sequence, 
is provided in selected off-campus school centers. The full quarter of 
student teaching is arranged cooperatively by the college, the participa- 
ting schools, and supervising teachers. Completed applications for admis- 
sion to student teaching must be submitted to the Dean of the School of 
Education during the first week of the quarter preceding student teaching. 
While student teaching, the student is required to adhere to established 
policies and procedures of the cooperating school system in addition to 
those policies and procedures established by the college and the School of 
Education. 

A student is admitted to student teaching at the time assignment is 
made. While student preferences and other personal circumstances art- 
considered, the School of Education reserves the right to exercise its 
discretion in placement. The student will receive a letter of assignment. 
Orientation to student teaching will be held during tin- first several days of 



L49 



the quarter in which student teaching is scheduled. The following require- 
ments must be met before a student can enroll in student teaching: 

1. Be admitted to the Teacher Education Program. 

2. Have at least senior status. All teaching field course will normally 
have been completed. 

3. Have completed the required professional sequence courses with a 
grade of "C" or higher. Elementary majors must make a grade of "C" 
or higher on all specialized content courses. 

4. Have a 2.5 average on all courses attempted, and "C" or better in all 
courses acceptable toward the teaching field, concentration, and 
related elective. 

5. Have satisfactorily completed the related professional laboratory 
experiences including the "September Practicum." 

6. Have satisfactorily completed the Media Competency Examination. 

7. Be recommended by two academic professors and two members of 
the appropriate Education department, one of whom must be the 
student's advisor. 

8. Be approved by the Dean of the School of Education. 

9. Students in elementary education must have completed at the least 
four of the specialized content courses, including the Teaching of 
Reading with grades of "C" or better. 

A student will not be permitted to take additional courses during stu- 
dent teaching. Student teachers are not permitted to teach in a school in 
which their children are enrolled. 



Early Elementary, Middle School Education 

Program for the Degree 

Bachelor of Science in Education with a Major in 

Early Elementary Education 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* 81 

1. English 111, 112, 211 15 

2. Choice of Art 200, 271, 272, 273; Music 200; 

Philosophy 200, 201; or English 222 5 

3. Drama/Speech 228 5 

4. Sociology 201 or Anthropology 201 5 

5. Psychology 101 5 

6. History 114, 115 10 

7. Political Science 113 and History 251 or 252 10 

8. Laboratory Science 10 

9. Mathematics 101 and choice of: 

Mathematics 103, 195, 220, 290 10 

10. Physical Education 103 or 108 and 117 and three 

activities courses 6 

B. Electives . 12 

C. Specialized Courses 53 

1. Art 320, Mathematic 391, Music 320, Physical Education 320 . . .18 

2. Education 339, 340, 425, 426, 434 25 

""Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission" 
section of this Bulletin. 

150 



Quarter limns 

3. Two of the following: ID 

Education 308, 309, 310, 315; English 331 

D. Professional Sequence Courses 45 

1. Education 203, 205, 301, 307, 430, 446, 447, 44* 40 

2. Psychology 301 5 

E. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 19] 

Program for the Degree 

Bachelor of Science in Education with a Major in 

Middle School Education 

Quarter limns 

A. General Requirements* 76 

1. English 111, 112, 211 15 

2. Choice of: Art 200, 271, 272, 273; :, 

Music 200; Philosophy 200, 201; or English 222 

3. Sociology 201 or Anthropology 201 ."> 

4. Psychology 101 5 

5. History 114, 115 10 

6. Political Science 113 and History 251 or 252 10 

7. Laboratory Science 10 

8. Mathematics 101 and choice of 103, 195, 220, 290 10 

9. Physical Education 103 or 108 and 117 and three 

activity courses 6 

B. Elective^ 5-7 

C. Content Courses 40 

1. Select one 20 quarter hour concentration from: 20 

Language Arts or Mathematics or Social Studies or Science 

2. Select another 20 quarter hour concentration from: 20 

Art or Language Arts or Mathematics or Music or 
Physical Education or Science or Social Studies 

D. Specialized Courses 23-25 

1. Education 425; Mathematics 391 10 

2. Select three from the following: 13-15 

Art 320; Education 339, 340, 426, 434; 
English 331; Music 320; Physical Education 320 

E. Professional Sequence 15 

1. Education 203, 205, 301, 302, 431, 446, 447, 448 40 

2. Psychology 301 5 

F. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



Secondary Education 

Please see program outlines in the appropriate departmental listings for 
certification programs in Biology, Chemistry, English. History. Mathe- 
matics, Music, Political Science, Psychology (Behavioral Science). 



'Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission" 

section of this Bulletin. 

1K1 



Course Offerings 
Education 

EDUCATION 203-ORIENTATION TO TEACHING. (5-0-5) 

Each quarter. 

The study of the status of education and of teaching as a profession. The 
student engages in directed self-study and plans for the achievement of his 
professional goals. 

EDUCATION 205-INTRODUCTION TO 

EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN. (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

An orientation to exceptional children with emphasis on educational 
implications and rehabilitation requirements. Includes classroom discus- 
sion of and visitations to facilities for training. 

EDUCATION 301-CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND 

THE EDUCATIVE PROCESS. (2-8-5) 

Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: Education 203. 

A study of the developmental learning characteristics of pupils in rela- 
tion to ways in which the school environment may elicit further develop- 
ment. Students attend seminars on campus and serve as junior profes- 
sionals in selected elementary schools. Enrollment limited to 16 students 
per section. 

EDUCATION 302-CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 

IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL YEARS (4-8). (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

The study of the social, emotional, and developmental characteristics of 
the child and how these factors affect his/her performance during the 
middle school years. 

EDUCATION 307-GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 

OF THE YOUNG CHILD. (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education or permission of 
instructor. 

The study of inter-relatedness of the aspects of growth and develop- 
ment; physical-motor, social-emotional, and intellectual cognitive for the 
young child. A unification of theory and research utilizing directed obser- 
vations and a study of various measurements appropriate with young 
children will be included. 

EDUCATION 308-CHILD AND HIS FAMILY. (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education or permission of 
instructor. 

The study of children including the parent-child, parent-teacher rela- 
tionships and cultural factors which affect children and their families. 
Techniques for development of parent involvement in the total develop- 
mental process. 



152 



EDUCATION 309-MATERIALS AND METHODS OF 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education or permission of 
instructor. 

The study of auricular needs, materials and techniques appropriate for 
use with young children. 

EDUCATION 310-PRACTICUM IX NURSERY- 
KINDERGARTEN EDUCATION. (2-8-5) 
Offered on demand. Prerequisite or corequisite: Education 309. 

Provides opportunities for directed experience with children under six. 
Students attend seminars and work in selected preschool programs. 

EDUCATION 315-NORMAL SPEECH AND 

LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

The study of normal language development. This course traces develop- 
mental scales of speech and language growth across various age levels and 
includes the relationship between speech and language. Observations. 

EDUCATION 330-SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

AND METHODS. GENERAL. (3-6-5) 

Winter, Spring, and Summer. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher 
Education, Psychology 301. 

The study of secondary school curriculum and methods. Detailed study 
is given to techniques of systematic observation, preparation of behavioral 
objectives, analysis of critical incidents, production of media materials, 
practices of classroom control, and examination of instinct ion models. 
Directed practicum. 

EDUCATION 339-ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LANGUAGE ARTS 
METHODS AND CURRICULUM. (4-3 

Fall. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education . 

This course is designed to offer the student the opportunity to explore 
methods, content, and materials used in teaching the skills of communica- 
tion to children. 

EDUCATION 340-ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SOCIAL STUDIES 

METHODS AND CURRICULUM. (4 

Spring. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 
This course is designed to prepare preservice teachers to teach children 

fundamental social studies skills and process* 

EDUCATION 425— THE TEACHING OF READING. (5 

Winter, Summer. Prerequisites: Education 203 and Admission to 

Teacher Education . or permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to study the developmental reading program. 
Emphasis will be placed on reading skills, approaches, techniques, mate- 
rials and evaluation for classroom use. 



153 



EDUCATION 426-PRACTICUM IN INDIVIDUAL 

READING INSTRUCTION. . (2-8-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Education J>25. 

This course is designed to provide prospective teachers with directed 
practice in the teaching of reading. Special emphasis will be placed upon 
diagnosis and teaching of needed reading skills. Students will be required 
to tutor one remedial reader. 

EDUCATION 430-CURRICULUM AND METHODS (K-4) (5-0-5) 
Winter, Summer. Prerequisites: Education 301 and Psychology 301 , or 
permission of the instructor. 

The study of existing administrative organizations and instructional 
programs, evaluation procedures, and experiences in curriculum design at 
the primary level. The study and development of teaching methods, mate- 
rials, and equipment. Directed field experiences. 

EDUCATION 431-ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 
OF THE MIDDLE SCHOOL (4-8). (5-0-5) 

Winter, Summer. Prerequisites: Education 301 and Psychology 301, or 
permission of the instructor. 

The study of existing administrative organizations and instructional 
programs, evaluation procedures, and experiences in curriculum design at 
the middle school level. The study and development of teaching methods, 
materials, and equipment. Directed field experiences. 

EDUCATION 434-METHODS AND CURRICULUM OF 
ELEMENTARY SCIENCE. (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Provides prospective teachers with a better concept of the meaning of 
science, processes for translating this concept into classroom practice and 
a variety of ways for helping children learn science, with special emphasis 
on the kind of inquiry that engages them in the process of discovery. 

EDUCATION 439-SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

AND METHODS, ENGLISH. (5-0-5) 

Offered Fall of even years. Prerequisite: Psychology 301 and admission 
to Teacher Education. 

The study of secondary school English curriculum with emphasis upon 
materials and methods of teaching English. Directed observation. 

EDUCATION 440-SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

AND METHODS, SOCIAL SCIENCE. (5-0-5) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, Psychol- 
ogy 301. 

The study of secondary school social science curriculum with emphasis 
upon materials and methods of teaching social science. Directed observa- 
tion. 

EDUCATION 441-SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM 
AND METHODS, MATHEMATICS. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Mathematics 260. 



154 



The study of secondary school mathematics curriculum with emphasis 
upon materials and methods of teaching mathematics. Directed observa- 
tions. 

EDUCATION 443-METHODS AND CURRICULUM IX 
HEALTH, PHYSICAL AND RECREATION EDUCATION. (5-0-5 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, 
Psychology 301, Education 330. 

The study of secondary school Health, Physical and Recreation Educa- 
tion curriculum with emphasis upon materials and methods of teaching 
Health, Physical and Recreation Education. Directed observation. 

EDUCATION 444-SECONDARV SCHOOL CURRICULUM 
AND METHODS, SCIENCE. 

Offered Spring of even years. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher 
Education, Psychology 301, and Education 330. 

The study of secondary school science curriculum with emphasis upon 
materials and methods of teaching science. Directed observations. 

EDUCATION 446-447-448. -STUDENT 

TEACHING. (15 quarter hours) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: See "(hurra I Requirements: 
Teacher Ed neat ion Programs." 

Students are placed in selected schools for one quarter as full time 
student staff members. No additional credit hours may he earned while 
student teaching. Classroom experiences and other staff responsibilities 
are jointly supervised by the college staff, supervising teachers, and 
principals in the selected schools. Open to transient students only with 
permission of the Dean of the Faculty at Armstrong and of the college from 
which the student comes. 

Library Science 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 110-INTRODUCTION TO 

LIBRARY RESEARCH AND MATERIALS. (1-0-1) 

An orientation to the Lane Library, library terminology, general re- 
search methods, and major library aids, such as the card catalog, classifica- 
tion and subject heading guides, general periodical and newspaper in- 
dexes, encyclopedias, dictionaries, almanacs, handbooks and yearbooks. 
This is a survey course to acquaint the student with a library's potential to 
answer his information needs as a student, civilian, researcher, or bush • 
person. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE Ul-SPECIAL PERIODICALS 

AND BIBLIOGRAPHIES. (1 

A self-instructional survey of special periodical and hook Indexes as well 
as atlases; ga/etters; biographical tools; reviews and criticisms; and na- 
tional, state, local, and selected international and foreign documents. 
guides and tools. 



155 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 310-REFERENCE MATERIALS. (5-0-5) 

Study and evaluation of basic reference sources for effective reference 

service in elementary and secondary schools. Designed to give the student 

a working knowledge of a library as an information and resource center. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 311-PRINCIPLES OF LIBRARY 
RESEARCH AND MATERIALS. (1-0-1) 

A study of general research methodology and tools. The methodology 
aspect will focus on two main areas of concern, (1) the question-transfer 
and negotiation process, and (2) the ability to recognize ready reference, 
bibliographic and evaluative reference/research questions. The study of 
tools will focus on the recognition and application of the proper sources for 
solution. A research project approved by the professor is required as 
partial requirement for completion of course. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 312-INFORMATION RESOURCES 
IN THE HUMANITIES. (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced reference materials and search 
techniques in the Humanities. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 313-INFORMATION RESOURCES 
IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES. (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced reference materials and search 
techniques in the Social Sciences. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 314-INFORMATION RESOURCES 
IN THE SCIENCES. (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced reference materials and search 
techniques in the Sciences. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 320-CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION 
OF SCHOOL LIBRARY MATERIALS. (5-0-5) 

Introduction to the basic principles of cataloging and classification of 
books and audiovisual materials through the use of Dewey and Library of 
Congress classification. The card catalog, shelf list, physical procession, 
and procedure for ordering and using printed cards will be studied. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 410-MATERIALS SELECTION. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Selection and evaluation of books and non-book materials; emphasis on 
those which meet curriculum needs and interest, and which represent 
various levels of difficulty; ways of stimulating their use. Attention will be 
given to selection aids and reading guidance. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 420-SCHOOL LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION 
AND ORGANIZATION. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Basic organization of books, non-book materials, and services for effec- 
tive use in school libraries. Administering the budget, purchase of mate- 
rials, personnel, circulation, inventory, weeding, and instruction in the use 
of library materials will be considered. Examination of the improvement of 
instruction by correlating library use with school curricula. 

156 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND ATHLETICS 

Professor Roy J. Sims, Head; Associate Professor Tapp; Assistant 
Professors Bed well, Bianehi, Ford, Knurr; Instructor Lariscy; Teaching 
Associates Burns and Roberts. 

Duringthe freshman year, all students should take Physical Education 
117 (Basic Health) and 103 or 108 (Swimming). During the sophomore 
year, students may elect any three Physical Education activity coin 
with the last two numbers being between 01 to 09. Student- unable to 
participate in the regular program should plan an alternate program with 
the Head of the Department of Physical Education. For other department 
regulations see "Physical Education Program" in section VII of this Bul- 
letin. 

Physical Education majors are urged to complete their ( 'ore ( lurriculum 
requirements before entering their junior years. 

Program for the Degree 

Bachelor of Science in Education with a Major in 

Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* 75 

1. English 111, 112, 211, and one course selected from: 20 

Art 200, 271, 272, 273; Music 200; 
Philosophy 200, 201; English 222 

2. History 114, 115 10 

3. History 251 or 252 5 

4. Political Science 113 5 

5. One course selected from: 5 

Sociology 201, Economics 201, Anthropology 201 

6. Laboratory science sequence 1<> 

7. Mathematics 101 and Mathematics 220 or 290 L0 

8. Psychology 101 and Drama/Speech 228 10 

B. Courses in Major Field 71 

1. Physical Education 103 or 108; 106; 109; 205; 207 

or W.S.I.: and seven courses selected from: 12 

Physical Education 100, 101, 102, 104, 105, 
107, 108, 200, 201, 202, 204, 206, 208, 209 

2. One of the following required: 2 

Physical Education 212, 213. 214 

3. Physical Education 117. 210, 211. 228, 229, 312, 

314, 315, 317. 318, 321. 322. 330. 413. 420, 121 57 

C. Approved Electives v 

I). Professional Sequence 1" 

1. Education 203. 330, 443, 44<;. 447. 448 30 

2. Psychology 30] and Special Education 205 1" 

E. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 194 



"Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission" 

section of this Bulletin. 

IR7 



Course Offerings 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 100-BEGINNING 

WEIGHT TRAINING. (0-2-1) 

Fall. 

Emphasis on developing physical fitness through a variety of fundamen- 
tal weight training exercises. Introduction of mechanical principles and 
techniques necessary for the understanding of weight training programs. 
Only one of P. E. 100 or P. E. 204 may count as an activity course toward the 
six hours of required physical education. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 101-CONDITIONING. (0-2-1) 

Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts, tumbling lifts and carries, road work, 
dual combatives and games. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 102-TEAM SPORTS. (0-2-1) 

Winter. 

Consists of two of the following sports: basketball, volleyball and soft- 
ball. 

*PHYSICAL EDUCATION 103-ELEMENTARY SWIMMING.(0-2-l) 
Fall, Winter, Spring. (P.E. 202 or the American Red Cross WSI course 
may be substituted for P.E. 103 or 108). 

Beginning swimming strokes, skills, and knowledge pertaining to safety 
in, on, or about water. This course or its equivalent required of all stu- 
dents. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 104-BOWLING. (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Basic skills in bowling. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 105-BADMINTON. (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Basic skills in badminton. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 106-TUMBLING AND 

GYMNASTICS. (0-2-1) 

Fall, Summer. 

Fundamentals and practice in beginning tumbling and gymnastic appa- 
ratus. Required of Physical Education majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 107-TRAMPOLINE. (0-2-1) 

Winter. 

The teaching of the proper care and use of the trampoline. Under strict 
supervision, the student learns to perform the following skills: seat drop, 

*Either P. E . 103 or P. E . 108 is required for all students. Students may register for the course 
for which they feel qualified without taking a swimming test. The instructor of that course 
will administer the swimming test, and any student enrolled in the improper course will be 
required to change to the proper course. Any student who holds a valid senior life-saving 
certificate and/or a valid water safety instructor's certificate and/or passes the Armstrong 
swimming test may be exempted from the required swimming courses. 

158 



knee drop, front drop, back drop, pull over, cradle, turntable, swivel hips, 
spotting, and somersaults. 

♦PHYSICAL EDUCATION 108-INTERMEDIATE 

SWIMMING. (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. (V .E . 202 or t .he American RedCross WS1 course 
may be substituted for P.E. 103 or 108.) 

Four basic strokes, skills endurance and knowledge pertaining to safety 
in, on, or about water. Required, if advised by Physical Education Depart- 
ment. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 109-TUMBLING 

AND GYMNASTICS II. (0-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: P.E. 106 or permission of instructor. 
Continuation of P.E. 106 with additional practice of tumbling and gym- 
nastic apparatus. Required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 115-OFFICIATING 

OF FOOTBALL. (2-2-2) 

Fall. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interpretation, and actual experience 
in officiating in class games, intramural games, approved community 
recreation games, and public school games. Elective credit. Students must 
have permission of the department head or course instructor to enroll. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 116-OFFICIATING 

OF BASKETBALL. (2-2-2) 

Winter. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interpretation, and actual experience 
in officiating in class games, intramural games, approved community 
recreation games, and public school games. Elective credit, students must 
have permission of the department head or course instructor to enroll. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 117-BASIC HEALTH. (2-0-2) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 
A basic course in health education with emphasis on personal health. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 200-HANDBALL AND 
PADDLEBALL. (0-2-1) 

Winter. 

Basic instruction in handball and paddleball activities. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201 -ELEMENTARY TENNIS. (0-2-1 1 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Instruction in class organization and methods of teaching skill in tennis. 



•EitherP.E. 103 or P.E. 108 is required for all students. Students may register for the course 

for which they feel qualified without taking a swimming test. The instructor of that course 

will administer the swimming test, and any student enrolled in the improper course will he 
required to change to the proper course. Any student who holds a valid senior life-saving 
certificate and/or a valid water safety instructor's certificate and/or passes the Armstrong 
swimming test may be exempted from the required swimming cow 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 202-SENIOR LIFE SAVING 

COURSE IN SWIMMING. ' (0-2-1) 

Spring. 

The American Red Cross Senior Life Saving Course. (May be substitu- 
ted for Physical Education 103 or 108.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 204-ADVANCED 

WEIGHT TRAINING. (0-2-1) 

Spring. Prerequisite: P.E. 100 or permission of instructor. 

Emphasis on continued development of physical fitness through a va- 
riety of advanced weight training exercises. Improvement of maximal 
muscular strength and endurance in the main muscle groups of the body 
through progressive resistance exercises. Only one of P.E. 100 or P.E. 204 
may count as an activity course toward the six hours of required physical 
education. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 205-FOLK, SQUARE, 

SOCIAL DANCING. (0-2-1) 

Winter. 

Instruction and practice in all forms of folk, square, and social dancing 
with emphasis on teaching techniques. Required of Physical Education 
majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 206-BEGINNING 

MODERN DANCE. (0-2-1) 

Winter. 

Basic interpretative dancing. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 207-SWIMMING METHODS 

AND TECHNIQUES. ■ (0-2-1) 

Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: P.E. 108 or equivalent. 

Methods and techniques of teaching beginning swimming skills. Re- 
quired of majors not completing the Water Safety Instructor's Course 
(offered by the American Red Cross.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 208-GOLF. (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 
Basic techniques and instruction for the beginning golfer. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 209-INTERMEDIATE 

MODERN DANCE. (0-2-1) 

Spring. Prerequisite: P.E. 206 or permission of the instructor. 

A continuation of Physical Education 206 with emphasis on dynamics, 
composition, and choreography. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 210-PREVENTION AND 
TREATMENT OF ATHLETIC INJURIES. (2-1-2) 

Spring. 

Theory and practice of caring for and preventing injuries relating to a 
large variety of sports. Students will be required to assist in laboratory 
experiences with treating and preventive training through the athletic, 
intramural or physical education programs. Required of majors. 

160 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 211— SAFETY AND FIRST AID. (3-0-2) 

Fall, Whiter, Spring. 

The American Red Cross Standard and Advanced course in First Aid. 
Required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 212-COACHING FOOTBALL. (3-0-2) 

Fall. 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play, emphasiz- 
ing methods and drills used by leading coaches. One of the coaching com 
is required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 213-COACHING BASKETBALL. (3-0-2) 
Winter. 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play, emphasiz- 
ing methods and drills used by leading coaches. ( )ne of the coaching <•< »u r 
is required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 228-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION 
OF THE HUMAN BODY I. (3-4-5) 

Fall. 

A study of the skeletal and muscle systems of the human body. Credit 
may not be applied toward the core natural science requirement. Required 
of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 229-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION 
OF THE HUMAN BODY II. (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: P.E. 228. 

A continuation of P.E. 228 with emphasis on certain human organ 
systems such as circulatory, respiratory, nervous and digestive. Credit 
may not be applied toward the core natural science requirement. Required 
of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 312-MEASUREMEXT AND 

EVALUATION IN HEALTH, PHYSICAL AND 

RECREATION EDUCATION. (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

Lectures, laboratory and field experience in the development, evalua- 
tion and application of tests in health and physical education. Required <>f 
majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 314-SKILL TECHNIQUE 
Fall. Prerequisite: the student must hare completed courses in at !<<ist 

three of the sports listed or must hare permission of the instructor to 

enroll. 

Practice in teaching methods and techniques in individual and dual 

sports such as: gymnastics, trampoline, badminton, tennis, golf. Required 

of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 315— SKILL TECHNIQUES (0-2 

Fall, Winter y Spring. Prerequisite: P.E. ->1\. 

Laboratory experiences consisting of assisting and teaching individual 
and dual sports such as: gymnastics, trampoline, badminton, tennis, golf. 
Open to majors only. Required of majors. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 317-METHODS AND CURRICULUM 
OF HEALTH EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY AND 
SECONDARY SCHOOLS. (3-0-3) 

Spring. 

Selection of health content in school curriculum, preparation and presen- 
tation of health topics. Teaching method is emphasized and student partici- 
pation stressed. Required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 318-INTRAMURAL AND 
RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES. (3-0-3) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Organization and administration of intramural sports with emphasis on 
secondary and elementary school programs. The study of organization of 
recreation programs with emphasis on recreation programs in the commu- 
nity through city and county sponsored agencies, YMCA, Boys Club, etc. 
Required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 320-HEALTH AND PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION FOR THE ELEMENTARY 

SCHOOL TEACHER. (3-0-3) 

Winter, Summer. 

Theory and current practice in the teaching of health and physical 
education at the elementary school level. Designed to meet the require- 
ment for elementary certification. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 321-MOVEMENT EDUCATION. (3-0-3) 

Spring. 

Designed to equip the student to teach elementary physical education 
via the use of "movement education," i.e. the guided discovery method of 
teaching the concepts of Space Awareness, Body Awareness, Quality of 
Body Movement and Relationships. Required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 322-TECHNIQUES OF TEACHING 
AND OFFICIATING TEAM SPORTS. (3-0-2) 

Spring. Prerequisite: P.E. 102 or permission of the instructor. 

Analysis of skills involved with teaching and officiating team sports. 
Students will receive practice in teaching skills and officiating in class in' 
basketball, volleyball, soccer and Softball. Required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 330-KINESIOLOGY AND 
PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: P.E. 228. 

Mechanical analysis and the functions of the body in muscular work. 
Athletic movements, fatigue, training and fitness are considered. Re- 
quired of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 413-SPECIAL TOPICS 

IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: Education UhS. 

Research methods in health and physical education. Allows students an 
opportunity for in-depth pursuit into areas of their interests. Open to 
majors only. Required of majors. 

162 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 420-HISTORY, PRINCIPLES AND 
PHILOSOPHY OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

Historical and scientific background of the prat-tiros in health and physi- 
cal education. Required of majors. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 421-ORGANIZATION AND 

ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

AND ATHLETICS. (5-0-5) 

Spri)ig. Prerequisite: Ed neat ion ^S. 

Practice and policies in establishing, administering, and evaluating 
physical education and athletic programs. Such experiences as curriculum 
planning and selection, care and maintenance of equipment are included in 
this course. Open to majors only. Required of majors. 



XL School of Human 
Services 

James F. Repella, Dean 

The School of Human Services believes that the development of the 
student as an individual is a primary objective of a college education. The 
central role and function of the School of Human Services is to provide an 
appropriate academic, intellectual, and professional milieu to develop the 
skills required for a high level of professional competence. This includes 
the development of intellectual and physical competencies; personal values 
and beliefs; leadership abilities; a sense of integrity, self-worth, and self- 
reliance; and a sense of responsibility toward the community and society. 
To achieve these objectives, the goals of the School are: 

To prepare graduates who possess, at the appropriate level, the compe- 
tencies required in their professional endeavors, and whose practice is 
compatible with the ethics of democratic humanistic philosophy; 
To prepare an educational environment which will motivate the student 
to develop a life-long commitment to learning and service; stimulate 
creativity, flexibility, and independence of thought and judgement 
within acceptable professional and humanistic constraints; and foster 
appreciation for scholarship and critical reasoning; 
To develop the leadership abilities of students so they may function 
effectively as leaders both in their professions and. in their communi- 
ties; 
To anticipate and to identify problems and needs and to encourage 
change and open-mindedness in finding solutions through appropriate 
research; 
To develop the School as a planning and resource center for professional 

growth and community service; 
To complement other Schools of the College by providing programs of a 
uniquely professional character which enhance the educational oppor- 
tunities of Armstrong State College. 
The School of Human Services includes the Departments of Associate 
Degree Nursing, Baccalaureate Degree Nursing, CriminalJustice, Dental 
Hygiene, and the degree programs in Medical Record Technology, Re- 
spiratory Therapy, and Social Work. The School cooperates with the 
Department of Biology in the offering of a degree program in Medical 
Technology. The following degree programs are offered within the School: 
Associate in Science in Criminal Justice (with a concentration in Correc- 
tions or in Law Enforcement) 
Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene 
Associate in Science in Medical Record Technology 
Associate in Science in Nursing 
Associate in Science in Respiratory Therapy 
Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice 



164 



Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

Bachelor of Arts in Social Work 
The School also cooperates with the Department of Biology in the offering 
of a Bachelor of Science degree program in Medical Technology. 

The student may combine with a major field of study one of the following 
minor concentrations offered within the School of Human Services: Crimi- 
nal Justice and Social Work. 

DEPARTMENT OF ASSOCIATE DEGREE 
NURSING 

Assistant Professor Marilyn M. Buck, Acting Head; Assistant Profes- 
sors Keller, Massey, Miller, Silcox, D. Smith, P. Smith; Instructors Calla- 
way, Frasier; Part-Time Instructors Dutko, Kluttz, Mathews, Stodghill; 
Degree Program Assistant Pingel. 

Admission Requirements 

For admission requirements for the Associate in Science degree pro- 
gram in Nursing, refer to the section on "Admissions" in this Bulletin . 

Associate in Science in Nursing 

The Associate in Science degree program in Nursing provides the stu- 
dent with the opportunity to obtain a general education and to study 
nursing at the college level. The program is approved by The Georgia 
Board of Nursing and is fully accredited by The National League for 
Nursing (NLN). Graduates are eligible to take the State Board Examina- 
tion for lincensure to practice as Registered Nurses. 

Student Nurses participate in nursing laboratory experiences at local 
hospitals and other community agencies and are responsible for providing 
their own transportation. 

For progression through the Nursing Program, the following must be 
maintained: 

1. Natural science courses (Chemistry 201, Zoology 208, 209, Biology 
210) 

a. A passing grade in each course ("D" or better) that is a prerequi- 
site for the subsequent Nursing course. 

b. A "C" or better in at least two of these courses. 

c. A student may repeat only one of these cours 

2. Nursing courses 

a. A "C" or better in each Nursing course that is a prerequisite for 
the subsequent Nursing course. 

b. A student may repeat a given Nursing course only one time. 

c. A student may repeat only one Nursing course. 

3. The maintenance of an overall grade-point average of 2.0 is desirable 
throughout the Nursing Program. When a student first falls below 



the adjusted GPA* required for the respective accumulation of quar- 
ter hours**, the student will be placed on academic warning. If the 
student's GPA is not raised to the required adjusted GPA* the next 
quarter, the student will be dismissed from the program. 



Accumulated 


Required Adjusted 


Quarter Hours** 


GPA* 


0-15 


1.5 


16-30 


1.75 


31-45 


2.0 


46 and over 


2.0 



TO MEET CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS WITH THE 
COOPERATING CLINICAL AGENCIES, THE DEPARTMENT RE- 
QUIRES STUDENTS TO SUBMIT A COMPLETED HEALTH HIS- 
TORY FORM AND EVIDENCE OF NURSING LIABILITY INSUR- 
ANCE PRIOR TO PARTICIPATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICUMS. 

Program for the Degree 
Associate in Science in Nursing* 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. English 111, 112 10 

2. Zoology 208, 209 10 

3. Biology 210 and Chemistry 201 10 

4. Psychology 101 5 

5. Political Science 113 5 

6. History 251 or 252 5 

7. Elective 5 

8. Physical Education 117 and one activity course 

or three activities courses 3 

B. Courses in Major Field 51 

Nursing 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 201, 202, 206 

C. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 104 

Course Offerings 

**NURSING 100 AND 100-L-FUNDAMENTALS 

OF NURSING. (2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the Nursing program. Eligibility for Eng. 
Ill and Math 101. Pre- or Corequisite Nursing 104. and Zoology 208. Fall. 

This course is designed to provide the student with learning opportuni- 
ties for the understanding of basic needs of man. Emphasis is placed on 
understanding of self and the client. Assessment of needs, implementation 
of fundamental skills, and evaluation of action are inherent throughout the 
course. 



""Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission" 

section of this Bulletin. 
**May be exempted by examination with credit awarded. Students must be admitted to the 

program before examinations are allowed. 

166 



**NURSING 101 AND 101-L-FUNDAMENTALS 
OF NURSING. (2-6-5) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 104, Nursing 100, Zoology 208. I } r<- or cor- 

equisite: Chemistry 201 or Zoology 209. Winter, Spring. 

A continuation of Nursing 100. Needs of clients resulting from common 
stressors are emphasized. Skills of technical and interpersonal interven- 
tion are applied to assist the client to increase his adaptive potential. 

NURSING 102-MATERNAL-INFANT HEALTH. (2-6-5) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 100, Nursing 104, Zoology 208. Pre- or cor- 
equisite: Nursing 101, Chemistry 201 or Zoology 209. Winter, Spring. 

This course uses an individualized approach to assist the student to 
utilize the nursing process in helping the expectant family to maintain or 
improve their adaptation to the stress of a new member. Laboratory 
experiences are designed to give the student opportunity to develop and 
practice nursing skills related to maternal and infant health. 

NURSING 103-PSYCHIATRIC-MENTAL 

HEALTH NURSING. (2-6-5) 

Prerequisites: Nursing 104, Nursing 100, Zoology 208. Pre- or co- 
requisite: Psychology 101, Chemistry 201, or Zoology 209. Winter, 
Spring. 

This course focuses on the development of self-awareness and on the 
therapeutic use of self in assisting man to maintain or regain mental health. 
The client with problems of adaptation is considered not only as an individ- 
ual but also as a member of a family within a community. 

**NURSING 104-INTRODUCTION TO NURSING. (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. Eligibility for English ill 

and Math 101. Fall. 

This course introduces the student to nursing as a profession, including 
history, legal aspects, professional organizations and current trends in 
education and practice. The course also includes foundational concepts 
concerning man and health within the stress-adaptation continuum. An 
integral part of the course is the student's development of an approach to 
learning in a guided independent manner. 

NURSING 201 AND 201-L-NURSING OF ADULTS 
AND CHILDREN I. (« 

Prerequisites: Nursing 100, 101, 102, 102, 104 and Zoology 208, Zoology 

209 and Chemistry 201. 

Nursing 201 builds upon the concepts of interaction, oxygenation, in- 
flammation and immunity and perception and coordination. Background 
knowledge relating to these concepts is utilized and incorporated in the 
nursing care of the ill adult and child. Learning experience.- are directed 
toward the care of clients with uncomplicated, commonly occurring stres- 
sors which exemplify these concepts. The learner uses the nursing pro© 
in providing nursing care to ill clients. 



NURSING 202 AND 202-L-NURSING OF ADULTS 

AND CHILDREN II. - (4-8-8) 

Prerequisite: Nursing 201. Pre- or corequisite: Biology 210. Winter. 

Nursing 202 is the second of three quarters study of the client experienc- 
ing a moderate degree of stress. The concepts of cell growth and metabo- 
lism are added to the foundation built in Nursing 201 and the student learns 
to utilize the nursing process for ill adults and children undergoing stress in 
increasingly complex situations. 

NURSING 206 AND 206-L-ADVANCED NURSING. (8-16-12) 

Prerequisite: Nursing 202. Spring. 

Nursing 206 is the third of three quarters study of the physically ill 
client. Emphasis is placed on utilization of the nursing process for adults 
and children having a multiplicity of needs. Under supervision, the student 
develops beginning skills in the direction and guidance of other health 
workers in selected aspects of client care. Assigned and self-directed 
learning experiences serve as the major vehicle by which the student can 
bridge the gap between the role of student and that of practitioner. 

DEPARTMENT OF BACCALAUREATE 
NURSING 

Associate Professor Martha A. Coleman, Acting Head; Associate Pro- 
fessor Hall; Assistant Professor Bell, Levett, Sullivan, Williamson; De- 
gree Program Assistant Pingel. 

Admission Requirements 

For admission requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree program 
in Nursing, refer to the section on "Admissions" in this Bulletin. 

All students are required to provide their own transportation to clinical 
laboratory experiences which are conducted in a variety of local commu- 
nity agencies. 

TO MEET CONTRACTURAL OBLIGATIONS WITH THE 
COOPERATING CLINICAL AGENCIES, THE DEPARTMENT RE- 
QUIRES STUDENTS TO SUBMIT A COMPLETE HEALTH HIS- 
TORY FORM AND EVIDENCE OF NURSING LIABILITY INSUR- 
ANCE PRIOR TO PARTICIPATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICUMS. 

Progression Requirements 

For progression through the generic Bachelor of Science Nursing pro- 
gram, the following must be maintained: 

1. A "C" or better must be earned in each pre-professional course. No 
more than one repeat grade will be acceptable. 

2. A "C" or better in each nursing course. No more than one nursing 
course may be repeated and a "C" or better must be earned at that 
time to remain in the program. 



168 



3. A nursing course in which the student makes a "D" or "F" must be 
repeated at its next offering. The course may be taken concurrently 
with a non-sequential course. 

4. An overall grade-point-average (GPA) of 2.0 Is required to remain in 
the nursing program. 

Attendance Regulation 

A student must matriculate each quarter, excluding Summer Quarter, 
to remain in the program, [f, because of illness or other extenuating 
circumstances, the student needs to be away from school for a quarter, the 
student must seek formal approval from the Department Head for such an 
absence. If such approval is not sought and granted, the student will be 
dropped from active status and must reapply for admission to the Nursing 
Major before continuing in the program. 

Courses at Another Institution 

The Department Head's approval is required if credit for courses taken 
at another institution is to be accepted for the Nursing degree. The taking 
of courses at another institution concurrently with the taking of courses at 
Armstrong must be approved by the Vice President of the College if credit 
for the courses taken at another institution is to be accepted for the 
Nursing degree. 

Program for the Degree 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

QuarU r Hours 

A. General Requirements (Pre-Nursing)* 19 

1. English 111, 112 Hi 

2. History 114, 115; Political Science 118 L5 

3. Psychology 101 5 

4. Physical Education 103 or 108; 117; and 

one activity course 1 

5. Mathematics 101 5 

6. Chemistry 121,122 1" 

B. Pre-Professional 17 

1. Zoology 208, 209 1" 

2. Biology 210 5 

3. BSN 202 2 

4. Chemistry 121,122 (sec above) 

(Some of the above courses may ho exempted by examination 
with credit awarded. Students must he admitted to tin- 
Nursing Major before examinations are administered. Permis- 
sion to take the examinations must be granted, as appropri- 
ate, by either the Head of the Department of Biology or the 
Head of the Department of Chemistry and Physio.) 

C. Nursing Major 12" 

General Education 

1. English 211 and Humanities Elective 10 

2. Mathematics 195, 220, or 290 5 

•Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission*' 

section of this Bulletin. 



Quarter Hours 

3. Upper Level Elective 5 

4. Physical Education Electives 2 

5. History 251 or 252 5 

6. Sociology 221 5 

Professional Nursing 93 

1. BSN 200 or BSN 300 (R.N. only) 5 

2. BSN 201, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305 31 

(These courses may be exempted by successful performance on 
challenge examination with credit awarded after admission to the 
Nursing Major.) 

3. BSN 306, 400, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 

406, 407; Nursing/Social Work 330 47 

4. Nursing Electives 10 

D. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

Course Offerings 

NURSING: BSN 200-INTRODUCTION TO 

PROFESSIONAL NURSING. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department of Nursing. Winter. 

This course is designed for beginning students of nursing. Major empha- 
sis is placed on an introduction to systems theory as it relates to the 
nursing process as a problem solving approach. The focus of the course is 
on the development of self-awareness, value clarification, and beginning 
skills in communication and interviewing. Historical perspectives in nurs- 
ing as they relate to current issues and trends are discussed. 

NURSING: BSN 201-BEGINNING COMPETENCIES IN 
PROFESSIONAL NURSING. (3-9-6) 

Prerequisite: Completion of BSN 200. Pre- or Corequisite: Biology 210. 
Spring. 

This course is an introduction to nursing theory and beginning compe- 
tencies in professional nursing. Major emphasis is placed on utilizing 
scientific principles and nursing theory in the performance of basic nursing 
skills. Students practice in a laboratory and/or clinical setting. 

NURSING: BSN 202-INTRODUCTION 

TO PHARMACOLOGY. (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department of Nursing. Winter. 

This course is designed to introduce students to broad classifications of 
drugs and common routes of administration. Drug actions and interactions 
with other drugs are also discussed. 

NURSING: BSN 300-CURRENT ISSUES IN 

PROFESSIONAL NURSING. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department of Nursing. 

This course is designed for the Registered Nurse student. The course 
focuses on self-awareness, value clarification and enhancement of the 
student's communication and interviewing skills. Emphasis is placed upon 
the concepts of: systems theory as it relates to the nursing progress; 
adaptation as a response to stress; primary care as a method of providing 
nursing care; the health/illness continuum. 

170 



NURSING: BSN 301-MEI)ICAL-SrR(;iCAL NURSING I. (2-9-5) 
Prerequisite: BSN 200 and BSN 201. 

This course introduces the student to beginning competencies in medical 
and surgical nursing care of the adult patient. Nursing planning and 
intervention focus on the stress-adaptive pro< if man as his state of 

health and/or illness fluctuate. Clinical learning experiences are provided 
in secondary health care settings. 

NURSING: BSN 302-MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING II. (2-9-5) 

Prerequisite: BSN .101. 

This course is built upon knowledge and skills acquired in Medical- 
Surgical Nursing I. Emphasis is placed on the role of the nurse as a 
member of the multi-disciplinary health care team. The student applies the 
nursing process in providing care foradult patients with multiple medical- 
surgical problems. Clinical learning experiences are provided in a variety 
of settings. 

NURSING: BSN 303-NURSING THE 

CHILDBEARING FAMILY. (3-4 

Prerequisite: BSN 200 and BSN 201. Pre- or Corequisite: 
Nursing /Social Work 320. 

This course is designed to provide learning experiences lor students in 
the care of women and their families during the maternity cycle. The 
primary focus of the course is the promotion of adaptation to the stress of 
pregnancy and delivery of an infant. Emphasis is placed on utilizing the 
nursing process to enhance the growth and development of the family. 
Clinical learning experiences are provided in a variety of settings. 

NURSING: BSN 304-NURSING OF CHILDREN. (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: BSN 2(H) and BSN 201. Pre- or Corequisite: 
Nursing/Social Work 230. 

This course is designed to utilize the nursing process in providing health 
care to children and their families. Emphasis is placed upon applying 
knowledge of children's developmental levels and needs as a basis for 
giving nursing care. A major focus is on stressors and adaptative behaviors 
unique to children. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety <»f set- 
tings. 

NURSING: BSN 305-PSYCHIATRIC-MENTAL 
HEALTH NURSING. 
Prerequisite: BSN 200 and 201. 

This course is designed to assist the student to assess mental status, 
stress levels, adaptive patterns and coping behaviors of clients with psy- 
chiatric problems. The nursing process is utilized to promote the client's 
ability to maintain and/or regain a higher level of mental and emotional 
functioning. Emphasis is placed on interpersonal relations. <i>\(- 
awareness. and therapeutic communication skills. Learning experier 
are provided in a variety of settings. 



NURSING: BSN 306-NURSING RESEARCH. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: BSN 200 and 201 or BSN 300. BSN 300 may also be taken 

as a Corequisite. 

The focus of this course is to expand the student's knowledge of the 

scientific method of inquiry. Emphasis is placed on exploring the research 

process and, how it relates to nursing theory and practice. 

NURSING 305-REHABILITATIVE PROCESSES AND 

HUMAN SEXUALITY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department of Nursing. Winter and 
Summer. 

This course is designed to examine current attitudes toward human 
sexuality, possible stress factors and individual adaptation and/or malad- 
aptation. Emphasis is placed on those rehabilitative processes in health 
care settings which facilitate positive adaptation of clients to sexual prob- 
lems. 

NURSING/SOCIAL WORK 330-HUMAN GROWTH AND 
SOCIAL ENVIRONMENTS. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201 or permission of the Department of Nurs- 
ing. Fall and Spring. 

This course is designed to examine the reciprocal relationship between 
man's physical, psychological, emotional, and social development. Empha- 
sis is placed on facilitating man's adaptation to internal and external stress 
throughout the life cycle. 

NURSING/SOCIAL WORK 410-HUMAN SERVICES 

TO THE ELDERLY. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Social Work 303 or permission of the Department of Nurs- 
ing. Winter and Summer. 

This course is designed for students going into public or private agencies 
serving the elderly. Emphasis is placed on the social, economic, and health 
needs of the elderly with attention to delivery systems that work. New 
knowledge, research, and actual projects are studied when practicable. 

NURSING: BSN 400-INTRODUCTION TO 

NURSING MANAGEMENT. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: All Junior Level BSN Courses. 

This course is an introduction to the concepts and principles of manage- 
ment as they apply to nursing practice. The major forces in society which 
impact upon the management of health care are discussed. Students ex- 
amine the development of leadership roles within the framework of an 
interdisciplinary practice. 

NURSING: BSN 401-NURSING MANAGEMENT. (3-8-5) 

Prerequisite: BSN 4.00. 

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to 
implement previously learned management concepts. Emphasis is placed 
upon developing beginning skills in using systems theory for problem 
solving. Students investigate and implement principles of sound nursing 



172 



leadership in increasingly complex situations. Clinical experiences are 
provided in a variety of settings. 

NURSING: BSN 402 -COMMUNITY HEALTH I. (3 - 

Prerequisite: All .Junior Level BSN Course8. 

This course is designed to assist the student in identifying the concepts 
of community health nursing, the principles of epidemiology, and the role 
of the nurse in the delivery of family health care. Emphasis is placed on 
primary care as a method of providing nursing care. Students utilize the 
nursing process to maintain and promote wellness and/or prevent illness of 
individuals, families and groups. Through systematic assessment of the 
functional abilities of clients, the student assists clients in the promotion of 
healthy coping behaviors. Learning experiences are provided in a variety 
of community settings. Students must provide own transportation. 

NURSING: BSN 403-COMMUNITY HEALTH II. (3 

Prerequisite: BSN \02. 

This course is a continuation and expansion of the concepts and princi- 
ples introduced in Community Health I. Emphasis of clinical experience- is 

on continuity of care of selected families while the scope of practice en- 
larges to include health notnh of groups and communities. Learning expe- 
riences are provided in a variety of community settings. Students must 
provide own transportation. 

NURSING: BSN 404-HEALTH ASSESSMENT. (3 : 

Prerequisite: Completion of Junior Level BSN Nursing Course 

This course is designed to increase the depth and breadth of the 
student's competencies in assessing client's health status and levels of 
adaptation. Emphasis is on the promotion and maintenance of health and 
the prevention of illness. A major aim is the recognition of deviations from 
normal. Students increase their skills in making appropriate referrals to 
other health care providers. Learning experiences are provided in a va- 
riety of settings. 

NURSING: BSN 405-ADVANCED NURSING THEORY I. (3 S 

Prerequisite: All .Junior Level Courses. 

This course assists the student to synthesize knowledge acquired from 
biological, social and behavioral sciences. The focus of the course is imple- 
mentation of the nursing process in the care of adults and children in acute 
care settings. Clinical learning experiences enable students to refine pre- 
viously learned skills and develop new skills required in the delivery of 
nursing care to patients with complex needs and/or problems. 

NURSING: BSN 406— ADVANCED NURSING THEORY II. 
Prerequisite: All .Junior Li vel Courses. 

This course assists the student to synthesize know ledge acquired from 
biological, social, and behavioral sciences. The focus is on providing com- 
prehensive health care to high risk childbearing families and families 
experiencing a high degree of emotional stress. Clinical learning experi- 
ences assist the student to apply the nursing process in the promotion of 



17:; 



optimal levels of wellness and healthy adaptive patterns in selected mater- 
nal-newborn and mental health settings. 

NURSING: BSN 407-SENIOR SEMINAR. (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: All Junior Level Courses. 

This course examines forces and factors which influence change in the 
health care delivery system. Current issues,, trends and implications for 
the future of nursing are explored. Role transition from student to gradu- 
ate is discussed. 

Program for the Degree 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (Registered Nurses) 

This degree program will not be offered after the 1979-80 academic year. 
Students currently enrolled in the program must complete its require- 
ments by the end of Spring Quarter, 1981. Program requirements, built 
upon the Associate in Science in Nursing degree, are listed in the 1978-79 
edition of the Armstrong State College Bulletin. 

DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Professor William L. Megathlin, Head; Associate Professor Magnus; 
Assistant Professors Menzel and Persons. 

Armstrong State College provides professional education to prepare 
students for careers in many areas in the administration of criminal justice. 
A strong liberal arts emphasis has been developed within the criminal 
justice program, enabling the student to prepare for new and demanding 
requirements in his profession. Specific courses in criminal justice are open 
to all students as electives. Students who plan to follow careers in the 
behavioral sciences, law, journalism, or education may find courses in the 
criminal justice area both interesting and useful. Non-majors should con- 
sult with their faculty advisors before electing these courses. 

Two programs of study are available to the student who wishes to study 
in the criminal justice area — a two year program leading to the degree of 
Associate in Science in Criminal Justice with a concentration in corrections 
or in law enforcement and a four-year program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in CriminalJustice. Each student should work closely 
with assigned departmental advisor in planning a program for either of the 
two degrees. 

Departmental Objectives 

As part of the total academic community, the Department of Criminal 
Justice shares the general philosophy and objectives which appear else- 
where in this catalog. In addition, some specific teaching, research, service 
and faculty development objectives impact upon the provision of effective 
professionals for the criminal justice system. 

Teaching. The primary function of this department is to impart relevant 
knowledge for the student's consideration and understanding. In addition, 



174 



the faculty must assist the student in the utilization of his/her resources to 
acquire and apply knowledge beyond the confines of a particular course. 
The objectives of our teaching are: to prepare students for further educa- 
tion and for careers in the criminal justice system, and to maximize the 
potential of students to be positive influences in criminal justice and 
society. 

Research. Although of relatively minor importance at an institution such 
as Armstrong, research has the potential to make a significant impact on 
improvement of local agencies in the criminal justice system. Our objective 
is to foster faculty and student research which may add to the field of 
knowledge and which may assist criminal just ice agencies in t heir efforts to 
become more effective. 

Service. For a professional, career-oriented program such as ours, con- 
tacts with the community and the many criminal justice agencies are 
essential. The objectives of these contacts are: to improve the teaching- 
component of the program; to foster coordination and cooperation among 
the agencies and with the public; and to foster improvements in the 
criminal justice system. 

Faculty development. To the extent that our faculty is competent, other 
objectives and goals are possible. Our objective in faculty development is 
to seek and utilize all possible opportunities to develop each faculty mem- 
ber to the fullest extent of his/her capabilities. An effective department is 
a direct outgrowth of effective faculty members. 

Program for the Degree 

Associate in Science in Criminal Justice 

with a Concentration in Law Enforcement 

Quartt r Hours 

A. General Requirements* 53 

1. English 111, L12 10 

2. Art 200, 271. 272, 27:;. Music- 200. or Philosophy 200, 201 5 

3. Mathematics 101 5 

4. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

,5. History 251 or 252 and Political Science 113 L0 

6. Psychology 101 and Sociology 201 LO 

7. Physical Education 103 or 108 and 211 3 

B. Area of Concentration W 

Criminal Justice 100, 103, 104, 
201, 210. 301 and two CJ electives 
('. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 

Program for the Degree 

Associate in Science in Criminal Justice 

with a Concentration in Corrections 

Qua rtt r flours 

A. General Requirements* ,;; 

1. English 111. 112 10 

2. Art 200. 271, 272. 27:5. Music 200, or Philosophy 200, 201 •"» 

3. Mathematics 101 •"> 

•Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admisa 

section of this Bulletin. 

17o 



Quarter Hours 

4. Laboratory Science Sequence > 10 

5. History 251 or 252 and Political Science 113 10 

6. Psychology 101 and Sociology 201 10 

7. Physical Education 103 or 108 and 211 3 

B. Area of Concentration 40 

Criminal Justice 100, 102, 103, 201, 
210, 301, and two CJ electives 

C. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 93 

At least 45 hours of each of these two programs must be completed at Armstrong. 

Program for the Degree 
Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice 

Students who intend to major in Criminal Justice should complete Criminal 
Justice 100 before the end of the freshman year and should complete all general 
education requirements as soon as possible. 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* 66 

1. English 111, 112, 211 15 

2. Art 200, 271, 272, 273, Music 200, 

Philosophy 201, or English 222 5 

3. Mathematics 101 and 103, 195, 220 or 290 10 

4. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

5. Political Science 113 and History 114 and 115 15 

6. Psychology 101 and Sociology 201, Economics 201, 

or Anthropology 201 5 

7. Physical Education 6 

Physical Education 103 or 108 and 211 and three 

Physical Education activities courses 

B. Courses Appropriate to Area of Concentration* .30 

1. Psychology 101 or Sociology 201 . . . '. 5 

2. History 251 or 252 5 

3. Criminal Justice 100, 103, 201, 210 20 

C. Area of Concentration 30 

Criminal Justice 301, 303, 305, 390, 403, 490 

D. Electives from Related Areas 65 

Sixty-five hours chosen from a list of selected electives. 
No more than fifteen hours may be taken from any one 
department except Criminal Justice. Seven of these 
courses should be 300-400 level courses. 

E. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



Minor Concentrations 

The department offers a minor inCriminal Justice, requiring 25 hours 
with grades of "C" or better in each course. The minor includes: C.J. 100; 
C.J. 210 or C.J. 301; C.J. 303; C.J. 305; and C.J. 403. 



*Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission' 
section of this Bulletin. 

176 



Course Offerings 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 100-INTRODUCTION 

TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE. (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

This survey course examines the emergence of formal institutions es- 
tablished within the American experience to deal with criminal behavior. 
The philosophical and cultural origins of the criminal justice system and 
current trends in criminal justice are emphasized. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 102-INTRODUCTION TO 
CORRECTIONS. (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

This course provides an overview of the American correctional system. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 103-DEVELOPING 

INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SKILLS. (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

The emphasis of this course will be placed upon the development of 
interpersonal communication skills, i.e., skills that can be effectively uti- 
lized on the job to improve interaction among employees and between 
employees and the public. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 104-BASIC LAW 

ENFORCEMENT. (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

This course will include a study of the police system in the United States, 
an overview of the basic purposes and objectives of the average police 
department, and an introduction to police ethics and professionalization. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 201-CRIMINAL PROCEDURE. (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

A survey of the distinctive features of, and the basis for, American 
Criminal Law buttressed by an analysis of leading court decisions relative 
to procedural rights emanating from the Bill of Rights. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 202-LAW OF EVIDENCE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

An intensive analysis of the rules of evidence in criminal cases. Particu- 
lar subjects will include burden of proof, hearsay, evidence, and the 
principles of exclusion and selection. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 203-CRIMINAL LAW. (5-« 

Winter. 

History and development of criminal law with definitions and general 
penalties. Special emphasis will be placed upon the Georgia Penal Code. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 204-CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. 

Offered on dew and. 

Introduction to investigative methodology. Special techniques em- 
ployed in criminal investigation, such as crime scene searches, the use of 
informants, and the techniques of surveillance will be emphasized, as well 
as the presentation of police cases in court. 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 210-CRIMINOLOGY. (5-0-5) 

Fall. 

The nature and extent of crime in the United States; assessment and 
evaluation of various factors and influences that lead to criminal behavior; 
various measures proposed for the control of criminal behavior. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 250-DIRECTED READINGS 

IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

A course designed to permit each student to pursue an approved topic 
through independent study and research under the guidance and direction 
of the instructor. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 301-JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. (5-0-5) 
Fall. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 100 or consent of instructor. 
A survey of theories of juvenile delinquency, the sociological, biological, 

and psychological factors involved in juvenile delinquency and the modern 

trends in prevention and treatment. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 302-CRIMINALISTICS. (5-0-5) 

Summer. Prerequisite: A natural science laboratory sequence or con- 
sent of instructor. 

An introduction to the problems and techniques of scientific criminal 
investigation. Emphasis will be placed on familiarizing the student with 
the role of science and technology in modern law enforcement. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 303-PENOLOGY. (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 100, 102 or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

This course deals with the analysis and evaluation of both historical and 
contemporary correctional systems. This course will also deal with the 
development, organization, operation and results of the different systems 
of corrections found in America. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 304-PROBATION AND PAROLE. (5-0-5) 
Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 303, or consent of 

instructor. 

This course will deal with the development, organization, operation and 

results of systems of probation and parole as substitutes for incarceration. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 305-LAW ENFORCEMENT 

SYSTEMS. (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 100, 101+ or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

An introduction to the philosophical, cultural and historical background 
of the police idea. This course is conceptually oriented and will deal with 
concepts such as the role of the police in contemporary society, the quasi- 
military organization of the police, and community relations. 



178 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 307-COMMUNITY 

BASED TREATMENT. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice SOS or consent of 

instructor. 

This course will investigate the different community base treatment 
programs. An emphasis will be placed on investigating the function of 
halfway houses and the use of volunteers in corrections. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 390-RESEARCH METHODS 

IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE. (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: English 111 and tl2, Criminal .Justice 210 or 
301, Criminal Justice 303 and 305. 

This course deals with the methods and techniques of research in the 
behavioral sciences. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to evaluate 
research. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 401-CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

PLANNING. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 390 or consent of 
instructor. 

Origins and evolution of modern day planning. Planning as a process of 
criminal justice decision-making. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 402-CIVIL LIBERTIES. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 201 or Political 

Science 317. 

Problems will be drawn from the substantive and procedural aspects of 

constitutional law and explored in the context of the current friction 

between the values of order and individual liberty. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 403-JUDICIAL PROCESS. (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 201 t Political Science S17 $ or 

consent of iusructor. 

Courts as political subsystems in comparative perspective. Judicial deci- 
sion-making and the development of public policy through the judicial 
process. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 406-LAW AND SOCIETY. (5 I 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 40S orthecown 

instructor. 

The study of the theory and philosophy of law and the relationship 
between law and society. Current controversies such as civil disobedience 
and law and personal morality will receive special attention. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 408— HUMAN RELATIONS. (5-0 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
This course will deal in th area of human relations as a means of control- 
ling and changing people. Emphasis will be placed on effective listening 
and effective communication. 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 440-SEMINAR IN 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Open to seniors only or by consent of 
the instructor. 

An intensive study of selected topics relative to the concept of criminal 
justice. Subject matter will vary annually. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 450-FIELD EXPERIENCE I. (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior criminal 
justice majors only and by invitation of the instructor. 

The purpose of this course is to broaden the educational experience of 
students through appropriate observation and work assignments with 
criminal justice agencies. The course will be organized around specific 
problem orientations with operational research connotations. Students 
will be expected to spend a minimum of five hours per week with the 
participating agency. Open to transient students only with permission of 
the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong State College and of the college from 
which the student comes. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 451-FIELD EXPERIENCE II. (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior criminal 

justice majors only and by invitation of the instructor. 

This is a sequential course to Criminal Justice 450 which will permit the 

student to further broaden his perspectives. Open to transient students 

only with permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong State College 

and of the college from which the student comes. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 452-453-454-INTERNSHIP. 

(5 hours credit for each course) 
Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Open only to upper level criminal 
justice majors. 

This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to 
apply academic training in the practical criminal justice setting. Settings 
will include law enforcement agencies (local, state or federal), community 
treatment facilities, and the courts. This course will be jointly supervised 
by college staff and law enforcement, correctional and court officials. Open 
to transient students only with permission of the Dean of the Faculty at 
Armstrong State College and of the college from which the student comes. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 490-DIRECTED RESEARCH 

IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE. (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice 390. 

A course designed to provide qualified students the opportunity to 
perform suitable and meaningful research into some area of criminal jus- 
tice under the direction of the instructor. Open to transient students only 
with permission of the Dean of the Faculty at Armstrong State College and 
of the college from which the student comes. 



18A 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTAL HYGIENE 

Assistant Professor James M. Bell, Head; Assistant Professors Adams, 
Simon, and Tanenbaum; Teaching Associates Fleming, Giorgio, and Rus- 
sell. 

Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene 

For the two-year (seven quarters) program leading to the Associate in 
Science degree in Dental Hygiene, the student must complete a curriculum 
of 55 quarter hours in academic courses and 58 quarter hours in profes- 
sional dental hygiene courses. The purpose of this program is to provide 
trained personnel in a rapidly growing and important health profession. 
Dental hygienists provide dental health services in private dental offV 
civil service positions, industry, and in various public health fields. They 
practice under the supervision of a dentist and must pass a state board 
examination for licensure. The curriculum is fully approved by the Com- 
mission on Accreditation of Dental and Dental Auxiliary Educational 
Programs of The American Dental Association. 

A passing grade in all related natural science courses is a prerequisite to 
the 200 level Dental Hygiene courses; therefore, Chemistry 201, Zoology 
208-209, and Biology 210 must be satisfactorily completed before the 
student will be admitted into second-year status in the Dental Hygiene 
Program. 

The student must earn a "C" or better in each Dental Hygiene course 
before he or she will be allowed to register for subsequent dental hygiene 
courses; therefore, a grade of "C" or better in the previous course(s) is a 
prerequisite for each dental hygiene course for which the student registers 
after the first quarter of the freshman year. An overall GPA of 2.0 is 
required for graduation from the program. 

Program for the Degree 
Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene 

Qua tier Hours 

A. General Requirements* 35 

1. English 111, 112 1<» 

2. Psychology 101 5 

3. Sociology 201 5 

4. Physical Education 211 2 

5. Physical Education activity course 1 

6. Drama/Speech 217 2 

7. History 251 or 252 5 

8. Political Science 113 5 

B. Courses in Major Field 58 

Dental Hvgiene 111. 112. 113, 114. 115, 116, 117. 
118, 119, 120, 210. 211. 212, 213, 214. 215. 216, 
217, 219, 220. 221 



•Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission" 

section of this Bulletin. 



Quarter Hours 

C. Courses in Related Fields 20 

1. Chemistry 201 5 

2. Zoology 208, 209 10 

3. Biology 210 5 

D. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 113 

Course Offerings 

DENTAL HYGIENE 111-CLINICAL 

DENTAL HYGIENE I. (2-3-3) 

Fall. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the dental hygiene 
profession. The subject matter includes fundamental knowledge of clinical 
procedures and techniques of removing stains and deposits from the teeth. 
Clinical procedures are introduced first on manikins and then applied in the 
mouth. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 112-113-CLINICAL DENTAL 

HYGIENE II AND III. (1-6-3) (1-6-3) 

Winter and Spring respectively. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 111. 

Students continue with oral prophylactic techniques on patients in the 
clinic under supervision. The subject matter includes advanced procedures 
which the hygienist will use in the performance of duties. The student must 
apply acquired knowledge in all clinical situations. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 114-DENTAL ANATOMY. (2-0-2) 

Fall. 

This course is designed to familiarize the dental hygiene student with 
the nomenclature, morphology, and eruption sequence of the primary and 
secondary dentition. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 115-ORAL HISTOLOGY 

AND EMBRYOLOGY. (2-0-2) 

Winter. 

This course includes primarily the study of oral histology and embryol- 
ogy and is designed to familiarize the dental hygiene student with the 
histology of the oral cavity and with the growth and development of the 
embryo with emphasis on the oral structures. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 116-HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY. (2-0-2) 

Spring. 

This course is designed to familiarize the dental hygiene student with 
gross anatomical relationships in the head and neck. Special attention is 
given to the antomy of the oral cavity and its clinical application. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 117-APPLIED NUTRITION. (2-0-2) 

Spring. 

This course presents the biochemical aspects of nutrition as applied to 
the practice of dentistry. Students are instructed in diet, history taking, 
and dietetic counseling. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 118-PERIODONTICS. (2-0-2) 

Summer. 
This course Is designed to give the student a basic understanding of 

periodontics. Emphasis will be placed on the significance of patient educa- 
tion and dental prophylaxis in the prevention of periodontal disease. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 119-DENTAL MATERIALS. (2-3-3) 

Summer. 

This course is designed to provide a general understanding of the chemi- 
cal, physical and mechanical properties of dental materials. The indications 
and limitations of materials will be stressed as well as proper manipulation 
of those materials used by dental hygienists. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 120-DENTAL ROENTGENOLOGY. (2-3-3) 

Summer. 

This course will include a series of lectures, demonstrations, and 
directed experience in the fundamentals of dental roentgenology. Intra- 
oral techniques for the taking and processing of radiographs are taught and 
laboratory time will be devoted to demonstration and directed experience. 
Clinical time in subsequent quarters will afford the application of the 
principles of clinical situations. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 210-GENERAL AND 

ORAL PATHOLOGY. (3-0-3) 

Fall. 

This course is designed to familiarize dental hygiene students with the 
principles of general pathology in relation to the common diseases of oral 
regions. Emphasis will be placed on clinical manifestations and the impor- 
tance of early recognition of abnormal conditions. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 211-212-213-CLINICAL 

DENTAL HYGIENE IV, V, VI. (1-12-5) (1-12-5) (1-12-5) 

Fall, Winter and Spring respectively. Prerequisites: Dental Hygiene 
111, 112, 113. 

These courses are a continuation of the preceding clinical courses. Em- 
phasis centers on improved proficiency in all areas of a working clinic. 
Lecture time is devoted mainly to the discussion of experiences encoun- 
tered in clinical situations. Pertinent material related to the dental hygiene 
profession is included in these courses. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 214-ANESTHESIOLOGY 
AND PHARMACOLOGY. (2-0-2) 

Winter. 

This course is a study of drugs and anesthetics with special consideration 
given to those used in dentistry. It is designed to acquaint the student with 
the principles of drug action in the human patient. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 215-PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY. (2 

Fall. 

The principles of prevention of oral diseases are presented. Emphasis is 
placed on training the student in the utilization of oral physiotherapy aids 



and on education and motivation of patients in proper oral hygiene. Clinical 
time in subsequent quarters will afford the application of these principles 
to clinical situations. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 216-DENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH. (2-0-2) 

Winter. 

This course introduces the student to the various aspects of public health 
with reference to the dental needs of the community. Special attention is 
given to terminology, epidemiology, and interpretation of data related to 
community dental health programs. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 217-DENTAL HEALTH EDUCATION. (2-0-2) 

Winter. 

This course is designed to familiarize the dental hygiene student with 
the practical application of modern methods of dental health education. 
Course content includes developing teaching materials for dental health 
education, demonstrations, and presentation of materials. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 219-TOTAL PATIENT CARE. (2-0-2) 

Winter. 

This course is a series of lectures to acquaint the student with the subject 
matter and practice of the various dental specialties in relation to the 
patient's total health. Emphasis is placed on periodontics, its treatment 
and the role of the dental hygienist in maintenance of oral health. This 
course is also designed to acquaint the student with the contributions to 
the provision of dental services by dental auxiliary personnel. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 220-DIRECTED 

FIELD EXPERIENCE. (0-9-3) 

Spring. 

Students will receive directed field experience in public health dentistry 
and for the handicapped. They will also experience planned learning expe- 
riences in private dental offices. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 221 -FUNDAMENTALS 

OF DENTAL HYGIENE. (2-0-2) 

Spring. 

This course is designed as a seminar to acquaint students with the ethical 
responsibilities of the dental hygienist, the jurisprudence governing the 
practice of dental hygiene, and the structure and function of the American 
Dental Association, the Georgia Dental Association, and the American 
Dental Hygienists Association. 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education 

This degree is comprised of preparatory courses which will enable the 
students to become instructors of Dental Hygiene. The students will work 
with the dental hygiene faculty and be directly under their supervision. 
However, their professional level will be above the student dental hy- 
gienists (Associate in Science degree students). 



Requirements include attendance at selected freshman and sophomore 
lecture classes and clinics. The number and times of attendance will be left 
to the discretion of the Head of the Department. Lecture subjects; reading 
assignments; grading procedures; and laboratory design; as well as in- 
struction technique; attitude and interaction between students, faculty, 
and patients will be graded by all faculty members, with the final grades 
being determined by the Department Head. 

In addition to courses listed for the Associate in Science in Dental 
Hygiene Degree, the following courses must be completed. 

Program for the Degree 
Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education 

QuarU r Hours 

A. General Requirements* .",:: 

1. English 211 :> 

2. Philosophy 200 or 201 5 

3. Mathematics 101. 220 in 

4. History 114. 115 in 

5. Physical Education electives 

B. Courses in the Major Field U* > 

1. Dental Hygiene 401, 402. 403, 404 

C. Courses in Related Fields 20 

1. Education 203, 330 10 

2. Psychology 301, 305 10 

D. Electives 2< » 

E. Regents** and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 

Course Offerings 

DENTAL HYGIENE 401-PRACTICUM IN- 
DENTAL HYGIENE EDUCATION I. (0-10-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Se)iior Status ami work expi riena . 

An introductory field experience in the college dental hygiene clinic, 
with emphasis on observation, individual and small group teaching, and 
teacher aide work. The first professional course for majors in Dental 
Hygiene Education. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 402-PRACTICUM IX 

DENTAL HYGIENE EDUCATION II. (0-10-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite I)H kOl. 

A continuation of Dental Hygiene 401. Problems common to beginning 
dental hygiene teachers, practices and procedures designed to accomplish 
program objectives, the establishment and organization of content, 
methods of clinical evaluation and supervision in the dental hygiene clinic. 

•Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit award) 

section of this Bulletin. 
**The Regents Examination is not required if it was successfully completed as a : 

Associate Degree program. 
NOTE: Students in the Bachelor of Science degree program in Dental Hygiene Education 
who did not complete History 251 •'^_ > .")L , anil Political Science 1 13 or their equivalents 
intheir Associate Degree programs must d<> so as part of their baccalaureate degree 
programs. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 403-PRACTICUM IN 

DENTAL HYGIENE EDUCATION III. (0-10-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: DH 1+02. 

An advanced field experience, designed to assist the student in the 
development of learning activities, teaching procedures, and the presenta- 
tion of materials pertinent to dental hygiene education. The student will 
develop and teach selected units in the basic dental hygiene sequence. 

DENTAL HYGIENE 404-DIRECTED 

INDIVIDUAL STUDY. (0-10-5) 

Summer. Prerequisite: DH 4.03. 

Directed individual study in an area of major interest with special 
relevance to Dental Hygiene and future career objectives. Laboratory 
experience will be included to meet the needs of the students. 

MEDICAL RECORD TECHNOLOGY 

The Board of Regents of the University System has approved a curricu- 
lum at Armstrong State College leading to the Associate in Science degree 
in Medical Record Technology. Information concerning the status of this 
program is available from the Dean of the School for Human Services. 

Program for the Degree 
Associate in Science in Medical Record Technology 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* 28 

1. English 111, 112 10 

2. Chemistry 201 5 

3. History 251 or 252 5 

4. Political Science 113 5 

5. Physical Education activity courses 3 

B. Courses Appropriate to the Field 20 

1. Zoology 208, 209 10 

2. Mathematics 101**, Computer Science 110 10 

C. Courses in Medical Record Technology 54 

1. MRT 101, 102, 103 15 

2. MRT 201, 202, 204, 205, 207 25 

3. MRT 203, 206 4 

4. MRT 210, 215, 220 10 

D. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 102 

Course Offerings 

MEDICAL RECORD TECHNOLOGY 101-MEDICAL 
RECORD SCIENCE. (3-4-5) 

An introduction to the history of Medicine and Medical Records with 
practicum emphasizing medical record purpose, content, functions, and 



"Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission" 
section of this Bulletin. 
**This course may be exempted by examination. 



contributions to the health field. An in-depth study of the principles to the 
development of the medical record including forms, numbering, filing, 

controlling, indexing, and analysis of medical data. 

MRT 102-MEDICAL RECORD SCIENCE II. (5-0-5) 

A survey of the hospital and medical staff organization; and introduction 
to regulatory agencies, primarily JCAH (Joint Commission of Accredita- 
tion of Hospitals); coding and indexing by ICD-9-CM; the study of the 
history and structure of ARMA. 

MRT 103-PATHOPHYSIOLOGY FOR MEDICAL 
RECORDS TECHNOLOGISTS. (5-0-5) 

Pathophysiology serves as an essential connecting link between the 
basic sciences of anatomy and physiology of the human body and the 
medical and surgical repair of a diseased host. Dysfunctions of normal 
physiology and the processes that bring about these disruptions will be 
considered. The manner in which these disruptions manifest themselves as 
signs, symptoms, physical findings, and laboratory results will be dis- 
cussed. 

MRT 201-MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY I. (5-0-5) 

A study of the language of medicine including word construction, defini- 
tion, and use of terms related to all areas of medical science, hospital 
services, and health related fields. 

MRT 202-MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY II. (5-0-5) 

A continuation of Medical Terminology I. 

MRT 203-MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION. (1-4-3) 

Prerequisite: Beginning typing I and Medical Terminology. 

Medical transcribing, editing medical reports, and managing transcrip- 
tion pools are emphasized. The Clinical laboratory time will be spent 
typing from cassette tapes through which medical reports (discharge 
summaries, operative reports, radiology reports) have been dictated by 
physicians. 

MRT 204-MEDICAL RECORD SCIENCE III. < 1-2-5) 

Principles of record analysis: completion of medical records by all medi- 
cal and other associated professional personnel, coding final diagnoses and 
operative procedures, completion of source documents for indexing and 
computerization. A study of medical audit methodology; knowledge of 
birth and death certificates; and implementing Problem ( Oriented Medical 
Record in health institutions. 

MRT 205-MEDICAL RECORD SCIENCE [V. 

Instruction in the medical library, various disease classifications and 
nomenclatures, cancer programs, and hospital indexes and registers. A 
survey of special record systems: Nursing Home and Ambulatory Care 
Centers; inter-departmental relationships with other functional areas of 
the hospital particularly the admitting office. A final review of the role of 
the Medical Record Technician in the health career field. 



MRT 206-HEALTH OCCUPATIONS. (1-0-1) 

An introductory study of the present system of health care on local, 
state, national, and international levels. The changing pattern of health 
manpower needs and the emerging trends are explored. Orientation to 
health facilities with emphasis placed on the organization of a hospital and 
its functional units. 

MRT 207-MANAGEMENT FOR MEDICAL 

RECORDS TECHNOLOGISTS. (5-0-5) 

The student is introduced to such management tasks as planning, or- 
ganizing, delegating, supervising, coordinating, and budgeting. Emphasis 
is placed on the inter-personal aspects of these tasks. Cost-effectiveness is 
the central theme. 

MRT 210-DIRECTED EXPERIENCE I. (1-4-2) 

Supervised learning experience at various health care centers. Specific 
assignments are made in the medical record departments such as records 
and loose documents filing, patient indexing, record controlling, and re- 
cord assembly and analysis. 

MRT 215-DIRECTED EXPERIENCE II. (1-8-4) 

The practicum emphasizes practical experience and dealing with the 
problems of department and personnel management. The student is given 
opportunity to accept responsibilities for certain jobs in the medical record 
department to gain and develop insight and understanding for all functions 
in the department, and to recognize the need for preservation for confiden- 
tiality of medical information. 

MRT 220-DIRECTED EXPERIENCE III. (1-8-4) 

Emphasis is placed on the managerial and technical concerns of the 
student practitioners. This directed clinical experience applies to the syn- 
theses of the program of studies, and prepares the student for transition to 
the graduate role. 

RESPIRATORY THERAPY 

Armstrong State College offers the following seven-quarter curriculum 
leading to the Associate in Science degree in Respiratory Therapy. Re- 
quests for information should be addressed to the Program Director or to 
the Dean for Human Services. 

Program for the Degree 
Associate in Science in Respiratory Therapy 

Quarter Hours 
A. General Requirements 28 

1. English 111, 112 10 

2. Mathematics 101 5 

3. History 251 or 252; Political Science 113 10 

4. Physical Education activity course 3 



188 



Quarter Hours 

B. Courses Appropriate to the Field 

1. Zoology 208, 209, 211 L3 

2. Biology 210 5 

3. Chemistry 201, '2.02 10 

C. Courses in Respiratory Therapy 60 

1. ResT 101. K)2, L03, 104, L05 32 

2. ResT 201, 202. 203, 204 28 

I). Regents and Kxit Examinations 

TOTAL 116 

Course Offerings 

RESPIRATORY THERAPY 101 -INTRODUCTION 

TO RESPIRATORY THERAPY. I 110-7) 

This course introduces the student to the profession by presenting its 
historical development, professional organizations, professional responsi- 
bilities, ethics and medical law. The metric system and medical terminol- 
ogy are integrated into the study of medical gas therapy which includes 
equipment theory, operation, techniques and applications. 

RESPIRATORY THERAPY 102-RESPIRATORY 
PHARMACOLOGY. (2-0-2) 

This course will present a general description of pharmacological agents 

encountered in respiratory therapy including the effects on respiration of 

drugs such as anesthetic agents and narcotics. Special emphasis will be 
placed on dosage, methods of administration, actions and side effects of 
drugs administered by therapists. 

RESPIRATORY THERAPY 103-RESPIRATORY 

THERAPY PROCEDURES I. (3-1 1 7> 

Prerequisite: ResT 101. 

Basic concepts related to the theory, operation, and clinical application 
of aerosol and humidity generating devices will be studied. Principles, 
techniques, procedures and equipment used in the administration of inter- 
mittent positive pressure breathing will also be studied. Pulmonary drain- 
age techniques and procedures will also be taught. 

RESPIRATORY THERAPY 104-RESPIRATORY 

THERAPY PROCEDURES II. L6-8) 

Prerequisite: ResT to-i. 

This course presents the basic principles and concepts of car- 
diopulmonary resuscitation, airway management, pulmonary function and 

continuous ventilation. Emphasis will be placed on performance of basic 
techniques and procedures. 

RESPIRATORY THERAPY 105— INTRODUCTION TO 
EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE RESPIRATORY CAKE. I 1 ! I 
Prerequisite: ResT 104, or permission ofth* ictor. 

This course provides indepth instruction in medical gas administration. 
aerosol and humidity therapy, intermittent positive measure breathing, 
cardiopulmonary resuscitation and airway management as it relates to 
emergency and intensive respiratory care. 

1-!' 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 201-PATHOLOGY AND 

PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS. (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Biology 210. 

Disease processes which affect the respiratory and cardiovascular sys- 
tems are studied. Physical diagnosis, using the skills of inspection, palpa- 
tion, percussion and auscultation will be taught as part of this course. 

RESPIRATORY THERAPY 202-CONTINUOUS 

VENTILATION. (4-13-8) 

Prerequisite: ResT 105, Chemistry 202. 

The theory and concepts of respiratory care with emphasis on continu- 
ous ventilation are studied. Topics in this course include indications, physi- 
ological considerations, ventilation patterns, management techniques, 
weaning procedures, types of ventilatory and functional characteristics of 
ventilators. Detailed instruction in the mechanics of equipment used in 
respiratory therapy is also presented. 

RESPIRATORY THERAPY 203-PULMONARY 

FUNCTIONS. (2-14-6) 

Prerequisite: ResT 202. 

This course will consist of an indepth exposure to pulmonary function 
evaluation procedures. The student will be taught principles and tech- 
niques of blood gas analysis, lung volume and diffusion capacity determina- 
tion. Much emphasis will be placed on performance of technical proce- 
dures, including arterial puncture, calculation of pulmonary function data 
and application of laboratory data to clinical situations. 

RESPIRATORY THERAPY 204-CLINICAL 

APPLICATION. (4-24-11) 

Prerequisite: ResT 203. 

This course will provide the student with the opportunity for an inten- 
sive application of Respiratory Therapy to specific specialities such as 
emergency, medicine, surgery and pediatrics. The student will be con- 
fronted with types of responsibilities and decisions that will be required of 
him as a respiratory therapist. 

SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIOLOGY 

Associate Professor Neil B. Satterfield, Director of the Social Work 
Program; Assistant Professors Brown and Ralston; Instructor MacLean. 

The degree program in Social Work is offered jointly by Savannah State 
College and Armstrong State College with coordination of the program 
shifting on a regular basis from one campus to another. Courses in the 
program are offered on each campus, with the campus location noted in the 
course descriptions printed below. Social Work faculty also offer support- 
ing coursework in the area of Sociology. 



190 



Program for the Degree 

Bachelor of Arts in Social Work 

The Social Work major must chock with his/her advisor prior to enrollment in 
Social Work 333 for the required guidance and evaluation procedure. 

Quarter Hours 

A. General Requirements* 96 

1. English 111, 112. 211, and one <»f the following: 20 

Art 200, 271, 272, 273; Music- 200; 
Philosophy 200, 201; English 222 

2. Mathematics 101 and Mathematics 220 or 290 10 

3. Political Science 113 and one of the following: 10 

Psychology 101, Anthropology 201, Economics 201 

4. History 114, 115 and History 252 15 

5. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

6. Foreign Language 101, 102, 103 or 
Philosophy 201, Anthropology 201, and a 

Social Science elective at the 100-200 level 15 

7. Sociology 201 and Social Work 250 in 

8. Physical Education 103 or 108 and 117 and three 

activities courses 6 

B. Courses in the Major Field 60 

1. Social Work 309, 320**, 330, 333, 

334, 335**, and 385** 35 

2. Two of the following: Social Work 406, 410, 430 10 

3. Field Experience — Social Work 451, 452, 475 15 

C. Courses in Related Field 30 

1. Mental Health 102 and any three of the following: 20 

a. Criminal Justice 301 

b. Psychology 405 or 400 or Education 385** 

c. Political Science 306 or 307 

d. Economics 201 

e. Computer Science 110 

f. History 379 or 367 

2. Sociology 315, 340 in 

D. Electives 5 

E. Regents and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

Course Offerings 
Social Work 

SOCIAL WORK 250-INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK. (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Alternating ASC, SSC. 

This course is a study of the social welfare systems and the social work 
profession as a discipline within it. The course presents an overview of 
social service delivery systems as a response to human need. The course 
requires 4 or 5 on-site structured observations of different social service 
settings. 

The student will examine the knowledge base, the value system. Un- 
professional skills employed, and the history of the social work profession. 

•Certain courses may be exempted by examination with credit awarded. See "Admission" 

section of this Bulletin. 
••Offered at Savannah State College only. 

191 



The student will begin a systematic look at his/her own lifestyle and value 
system as potential for becoming a social work professional. 

SOCIAL WORK 309-GROUP PROCESS. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: SW 250 and completion of General Requirements as 
listed in the degree program outline. Offered each quarter. ASC. 

A course designed primarily to develop basic skills in working with 
groups and to increase one's level of self awareness. The body of knowl- 
edge is measured by written tests and term papers. Communication skills, 
values, and one's affective domain are measured by peer ratings, group 
exercises, and professor's judgement. For behavioral science and profes- 
sional degree majors only. 

SOCIAL WORK 320-ETHNIC MINORITIES. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Sociology 201 or Social Work 250. Fall and Spring. SSC. 
This course focuses on the present factual situation in America. The 
course examines the problems faced by minorities in America, especially 
where skin color and language pose social and economic barriers. It looks 
at dominant public institutions and patterns of response by minorities such 
as Black Americans, Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, Native Americans, and 
other sizeable ethnic groups. 

SOCIAL WORK/NURSING 330-HUMAN 

GROWTH AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT. (5-0-5) 

. Prerequisite: Sociology 201 and Psychology 101 or SOS 201. Fall and 
Spring. ASC. 

A course designed to examine the reciprocal relationships between man 
and his environment and the effects of this relationship on man's physical, 
emotional, and social development. Emphasis will be placed on facilitating 
man's adaptation to internal and external stress throughout the life cycle. 

SOCIAL WORK 333-INTERVENTIVE METHODS I. (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: Social Work 250 and 330. Offered twice each year. SSC. 
A course designed to develop and to sharpen interpersonal communica- 
tion skills. The student learns to use conversation, observation, and ana- 
lytical helping skills in a variety of roles played by the generalist social 
worker. The course presents the student with a wide variety of interview 
situations in which he must demonstrate a high degree of competence. 

SOCIAL WORK 334-INTERVENTIVE METHODS II. (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Social Work 333. Offered twice each year. ASC. 
This course teaches an approach to human problem solving utilizing a 
systems approach with emphasis on patterns of coping, family relation- 
ships, behavior study, diagnosis, and treatment or plan of action. Compe- 
tency in crisis intervention and selection of proper treatment modality 
must be demonstrated. 

SOCIAL WORK 335-INTERVENTIVE METHODS III. (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Social Work 334. Offered twice each year. SSC. 
A sequel to Social Work 334 with the main thrust on neighborhood and 
community need. Predicated on the concept that wherever there is wide- 
spread human need or suffering there is a breakdown of some aspect of the 

192 



social system. Using multiple roles of the generalist, particularly data 
gatherer, analyst, consultant, mobilizer, and advocate, students are 
taught to analyze system dysfunction and its impact on people and they 
must demonstrate competence in these roles. 

SOCIAL WORK 385— SOCIAL POLICY AND 
ADMINISTRATION. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Social Work .LJ5. Foil, Summer and on demand. SSC. 

This course is designed to help students to understand the process* 
social change including legislation to the delivery of social services. It 
examines the appropriate bureaucratic structure, funding and policy mak- 
ing, and need for public accountability. Students will learn system.- of 
priority setting and methods of efficiency which can be both effective and 
humane. 

SOCIAL WORK 406-CHILD WELFARE. (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: Social Work 250, AAA, and Social Work/Nursing 330. 

Fall and Spring. 

This course reviews child development and social behavior with an 
emphasis on the practical application of understanding and psychosocial, 
mental, and physical development of children. The environmental and 
family situation is studied and related to the child's development or lack 
thereof. Actual work with children identified as needing tutorial help. 
behavioral correction, emotional support, or environmental change is ex- 
pected of each student participating. The emphasis is on the disadvantaged 
child who is most subject to these problems. 

SOCIAL WORK 410-AGING AND SERVICES 
TO THE ELDERLY. (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: Social Work 330, AAA, or permission of the Social Work 

Program Coordinator. Winter, Summer. ASC. 

A course designed for students expecting to go into public or private 
agencies serving the elderly. Emphasis will be placed on the social, eco- 
nomic, and health needs of the elderly with attention to social service 
delivery systems that work. Developing knowledge in gerontology is 
integrated into the classroom and field projects wherever practicable. 

SOCIAL WORK 430-ALCOHOL AND DRUG STUDIES. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Social Work 335 for Social Work majors: others by />< r- 

missi&n of instructor. Fall, Spring. ASC. 

A course focusing on the various forms of alcohol and drug abuse with 
emphasis on the stages of harmful dependence and addiction. There will bo 
an examination of the legal and social implications of addiction as well as 
approaches to treatment and rehabilitation. 

SOCIAL WORK 451-FIELD EXPERIENCE I. (5 credit hours) 

Prerequisites: Opoi to Social Work majors only. All majors must havi 
completed the core curriculum and all required 100-200-300 level courst 

Winter. 

Each student will work in a social service setting a minimum of 20 clock 
hours per week. The course is designed for optimal learning experiences 

193 



with clients, agencies, and the community and to increase the student's 
knowledge and ability under professional supervision. There will be a 
weekly meeting with the field coordinator. 

SOCIAL WORK 452-FIELD EXPERIENCE II. (5 credit hours) 

Prerequisite: Social Work 451. Spring. 

This is an advanced field experience wherein greater proficiency and 
additional skills are expected from the student. The student must demon- 
strate competency in a variety of roles played by the generalist social 
worker. This course will be taken concurrently with Social Work 475. 

SOCIAL WORK 475-SENIOR SEMINAR. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Social Work 451. Spring. 

This is a course required of all Social Work majors and is taken concur- 
rently with Social Work 452. It is designed to integrate classroom learning, 
basic theory, professional journal reports and life experience with the 
student's experience in the field. 

SOCIAL WORK 490-INDEPENDENT STUDY (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Invitation of professor. 

Experiential based study of a selected social work topic. Open to tran- 
sient students only with permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong 
and the college from which the student comes. 

SOCIAL WORK 491-INDEPENDENT STUDY (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Invitation of professor. 

Research and experiental based study in social work topic of student 
interest or specialty. Open to transient students only with permission of 
the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the college from which the student 
comes. 

Sociology 

SOCIOLOGY 201-INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY. (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to the concept and methods of the science of human 
group behavior. Includes the study of socialization, the role of the individ- 
ual in society, and the major institutions and processes. 

SOCIOLOGY 315-THE FAMILY AND 

ALTERNATIVE LIFE-STYLES. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. 

A study of the role of the family in the development of the individual, the 
family unit and societal institutions. Consideration will be given to various 
structures and functions of the family as it exists or is emerging in 
America. 

SOCIOLOGY 333-EXPLORING POPULAR CULTURE. (4-2-5) 

Summer. Prerequisite: Sociology 201. 

An examination of popular culture using music, radio, television, texts, 
magazines, movies, technology and language to explore a given era. Com- 



194 



parisons will be made of lifestyles, sex roles, racial attitudes and the 
national and regional mood of times examined. 

SOCIOLOGY 350— SOCIAL PROBLEMS. (5 I 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. Winter and Spring. 

An examination of behavioral deviancy, normative strain, and differ- 
ences between social [deals and social realities in the context of sociological 

theory. 

SOCIOLOGY 450-INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1 1 -">>-<>-< 1-5) 

By invitation of the professor. Offered on demand. Often to transient 

students only with permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and 

the college from which the student comes. 



195 



XII. Governing Board, 

Administration, 

Faculty, and Staff 

Members of the Board of Regents 

ERWIN A. FRIEDMAN, Chairman Savannah 

LAMAR R. PLUNKETT, Vice Chairman Bowden 

SCOTT CANDLER, JR Decatur 

RUFUS B. COODY Vienna 

MARIE WALTER DODD Atlanta 

THOMAS H. FRIER .Douglas 

JESSE HILL, JR Atlanta 

0. TORBITT IVEY, JR Augusta 

MILTON JONES Columbus 

JAMES D. MADDOX Rome 

ELRIDGE W. McMILLAN Atlanta 

CHARLES T. OXFORD Albany 

JOHN H. ROBINSON, III Americus 

P. R. SMITH Winder 

CAREY WILLIAMS Greensboro 

Staff of the Board of Regents 

VERNON D. CRAWFORD Acting Chancellor 

GEORGE A. CHRISTENBERRY Acting Vice Chancellor 

HENRY G. NEAL Executive Secretary 

SHEALY E. McCOY Vice Chancellor 

Fiscal Affairs and Treasurer 

FRANK C. DUNHAM Vice Chancellor-Facilities 

MARIO J. GOGLIA Vice Chancellor-Research 

HOWARD JORDAN, JR Vice Chancellor-Health Affairs 

HASKIN R. POUNDS Vice Chancellor-Planning 

H. DEAN PROPST Acting Vice Chancellor- 
Academic Development 

JAMES L. CARMON .Assistant Vice Chancellor 

Computing Systems 

MARY ANN HICKMAN Assistant Vice Chancellor-Personnel 

ROBERT M. JOINER Assistant Vice Chancellor 

Communications 

(Vacant) Assistayit Vice Chancellor 

Academic Development 



196 



Officers of Administration 

HENRY L. ASHMORE President 

**H. DEAN PROPST Vice President and Dean of Faculty 

JULE R. STANFIELD Vice President for Business and Financt 

ROBERT A. BURNETT Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

CHARLES R. NASH Dean, School of Education 

JOSEPH V. ADAMS Dean, Graduate and Extended Stud 

JAMES F. REPELLA Dean, School of Human Sen 

DONALD D. ANDERSON . . .Dean, College <md Community Services 

JOSEPH A. BUCK Dean, Student Allans 

GEORGE S. HUNNICUTT Registrar 

**GERALD C. SANDY Librarian 

ETHEL J. MILLER Acting Librarian 

ARTHUR 0. PROSSER Comptroller 

JAMES WINTERS Director of Student Financial Aid 

and VeU runs Affairs 

J. PHILLIP COOK Director of Program Development- 
Continuing Education 

TOM MILLER Director of Admissions and Recruitment 

ERICH F. STOCKER Director of Development and 

Assistant to the President 

AL HARRIS Director of Student Activitu 8 

PAULA TOMPKINS . .Personnel Officer 

LYNN BENSON Counselor and Psychometrist 

VICKI G. NORWICH Coordinator, Short Courses-Confi 

LINDA WITTISH Coordinator, Public Information 



Faculty 

JOSEPH V. ADAMS, B.A., Tennessee Temple College; M.A., Baylor 
University; Ph.D., University of Alabama; Dean for Graduate and Ex- 
tended Studies, Professor of Psychology 

TERESA ANN ADAMS, B.S., West Liberty State College; Assistant 
Professor of Dental Hygiene 

STEPHEN K. AGYEKUM, A.B., Johnson C. Smith University: M.A.. 
Ed.D., University of Georgia; Associate Professor of Education 

JAMES E. AMBROSE, B.M.,Oberlin Conservatory; M.M., University 
of South Florida; Assistant Professor of Music 

M. LORRAINE ANCHORS, A. B., M. A. . Baylor University; Pro/< • isor 
of English 

DONALD D. ANDERSON, B.S., Georgia Southern College; M.A., 
Peabody College; Ed.D., Auburn University; Dean for College and Com- 
munity Services, Associate Professor of Education 

OLAVI ARENS, A.B., Harvard University: M.A., Certificate (Rus- 
sian Studies), Ph.D., Columbia University; Associate Professor of History 



'On leave. 

197 



HENRY L. ASHMORE, B.A.E., M.A.E., D.Ed., University of Flor- 
ida; President 

ARDELLA PATRICIA BALL, A.B., Fisk University; M.S.L.S., At- 
lanta University; Assistant Professor of Library Science 

GEORGE H. BEDWELL, B.S., Samford University; M.S., University 
of Alabama; Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

W. ORSON BEECHER, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Georgia; Professor of History 

DOROTHY G. BELL, B.S.N. Ed., University of Georgia; M.N., Emory 
University; Assistant Professor of Nursing 

JAMES M. BELL, D.D.S., Marquette University School of Dentistry; 
Head, Department of Dental Hygiene, Assistant Professor of Dental 
Hygiene 

LYNN BENSON, A.B., M.Ed., University of Georgia; Counselor and 
Pyschometrist 

RONALD J. BEUMER, B.S., University of Dayton; Ph.D., University 
of Arkansas; Assistant Professor of Biology 

GEORGE L. BIANCHI, B.S., Wittenburg University; M.A., Ball 
State University; Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

RUBY BLACK, B.S., Savannah State College; M.Ed., Ed.S., Univer- 
sity of Georgia; Assistant Professor of Education 

VIRGINIA R. BLALOCK, B.S., Savannah State College; M.A., Co- 
lumbia University; Associate Professor of Education 

NANCY V. BLAND, B.A., Coker College; M.Ed., Clemson Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of Georgia; Associate Professor of Education 

MADALINE P. BONEY, A.B., Winthrop College; M.Ed., Georgia 
Southern College; Ed.S., University of Georgia; Assistant Professor of 
History 

STEPHEN P. BRANDON, B.M.E., University of Kansas, Lawrence; 
M. A. , University of Iowa; D.M. A. , Catholic University; Associate Profes- 
sor of Music 

JOHNG. BREWER, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia; Profes- 
sor of Chemistry 

S. KENT BROOKS, B.A., M.A., University of Texas; M.Phil., Ph.D., 
George Washington University; Associate Professor of English 

MOONYEAN S. BROWER, B.S., M.A., University of Massachusetts; 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

GEORGE E. BROWN, B.A., Armstrong State College; M.S.S.W., 
Atlanta University; Assistant Professor of Social Work and Sociology 

HUGH R. BROWN, B.S., Xavier University; M.A.T., St. Michael's 
College; Ph.D., University of South Carolina; Associate Professor of En- 
glish (Special Studies) 

JOSEPH A. BUCK, B.A., Auburn University; M.S., Florida State 
University; Ed.D., University of Georgia; Dean for Student Affairs 

MARILYN M. BUCK, B.S., Boston University; M.S.N. , Medical Col- 
lege of Georgia; Assistant Professor of Nursing, Acting Head of the 
Department of Associate Degree Nursing 



198 



CLIFFORD V. BURGESS, A.B., Mercer University; M.A.. George 
Peabody College; Ed.D., Auburn University; Professor of Education 

ROBERTA. BURNETT, B.A., Wofford College; M.A., Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Dean of the School of Arts and 
Sciences and Professor of History 

CREIGHTON E. BURNS, B.P.E., Purdue University; M.Ed., Saint 
Francis College; Teaching Associate in Physical Education 

MARGARETA. CALLAWAY, B.S.,M.S.N\, Medical College of Geor- 
gia; Instructor in Nursing 

ROSSL. CLARK, B. A., Ph.D., Tulane University; Professor of Politi- 
cal Science 

JOHN H.COCHRAN, JR., A.B., Paine College; M.A., Atlanta Univer- 
sity; Ed.D., University of Georgia; Associate Professor of Education 

MARTHA A. COLEMAN, B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia; M.X.. 
Emory University; Associate Professor of Nursing, Acting Head of th< 
Department of Baccalaureate Nursing 

BERNARDJ.COMASKEY,B.A., Fordham College; M. A., New York 
University; Assistant Professor of History 

J. PHILLIP COOK, B.S., University of Georgia; M.Ed., Ed.S., Wesl 
Georgia College; Director of Program Development-Continuing Educa- 
tion 

ELLEN A. COTTRELL, B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.Ed., Georgia 
Southern College; Assistant Professor of English (Special Studies) 

WILLIAM E. COYLE, A.B., Emory University; M.A., Georgetown 
University; Ph.D., Florida State University; Professor of Political Sci- 
ence 

EVELYN M. DANDY, B.S. , Millersville State College; M. Ed. , Temple 
University; Assistant Professor of Reading (Special Studies) 

LESLIE B. DAVENPORT, JR., B.S., College of Charleston; M.S., 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., University of Georgia; Head. D< 
partment of Biology, Professor of Biology 

LAMAR W. DAVIS, B.S., M.S., University of South Carolina; Certi- 
fied Public Accountant; Professor Emeritus of Business Administration 

DIANE DIXON, B.S., Armstrong State College; Teaching AssociaU 
in Biology 

WILLIAM KEITH DOUGLASS, B.A., Franklin and Marshall College; 
M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University; Associate Professor of Psychology 

JOHN DONALD DUNCAN, B.S., College of Charleston; M.A.. Uni- 
versity of South Carolina; Ph.D., Emory University; Professor ofHisi 

♦KATHLEEN DUTKO, B. S.N. , Niagara University: M.A.. New York 
University; Instructor in Nursing 

WILLIAM L. EASTERLING,B.S., Western Carolina College; M.A.. 
Middlebury College; Ph.D., University of Georgia; Diploma. Sorbonne, 
France; Professor of French and Spanish 

JAMESD. EVANS, B.S., Armstrong State College; M.S.L.S., Univer- 
sity of Kentucky; Cataloger (Library) 

•Part-time. 

199 



JOHN FINDEIS, B.S., M.S., University of Illinois; Assistant Profes- 
sor of Mathematics and Computer Science 

♦CAROLINE C. FLEMING, A. S., Richland Technical Education Cen- 
ter; Clinical Teaching Associate in Dental Hygiene 

BETTY J. FORD, B.S., Winthrop College; M.Ed., Georgia Southern 
College; Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

SHIRLEY FRASIER, B.S., Albany State College; M.S.N. , Medical 
College of Georgia; Instructor in Nursing 

IDA J. GADSDEN, B.S., Savannah State College; M.S.P.H., North 
Carolina College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina; Professor of Edu- 
cation 

DENNIS P.. GEOFFROY, B. A. , Westfield State College; M. A. , Ph.D. , 
University of South Carolina; Assistant Professor of Mathematics and 
Computer Science 

*PATRICIA M. GIORGIO, A. S. , Loyola University; Clinical Teaching 
Associate in Dental Hygiene 

MARY B. GOETTE, A.B., Georgia State College for Women; Tempo- 
rary Instructor in Chemistry 

JIMMIE F. GROSS, B.A., Baylor University; B.D., Southern Baptist 
Seminary; M.A., Auburn University; Ph.D., University of Georgia; Pro- 
fessor of History 

LAURENT J. GUILLOU, JR., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Louisiana State 
University; Associate Professor of Biology 

ETHEL P. HALL, B.S.N. , M.S.N. , Georgia Medical College; Associ- 
ate Professor of Nursing 

JOHN R. HANSEN, B.S., Troy State College; M.E(L, Ed.D., Univer- 
sity of Georgia; Head, Department of Special Studies; Professor of Mathe- 
matics 

CLIFFORD E. HARDWICK, III, B.S., Savannah State College; 
M.Lit., University of Pittsburgh; Director, Neighborhood Continuing 
Education Program, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Education 

THELMA M. HARMOND, B.S., Fort Valley State College; M.Ed., 
Atlanta University; Ph.D., Ohio State University; Professor of Education 
and Head of the Department of Elementary Education 

JO C. HARPER, B.A., M.A., Texas Technological University; Assis- 
tant Professor of English 

AL HARRIS, B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University; Director of 
Student Activities 

HENRY E. HARRIS, B.S., Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology; 
Head, Department of Chemistry and Physics, Professor of Chemistry 

KARL D. HARRIS, B.A., Carson Newman College; M.A., University 
of Tennessee; Assistant Professor of English and Reading (Special Stu- 
dies) 

JOHN S. HINKEL, M.S., University of Florida; Ph.D., University of 
South Carolina; Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science 

ANNE L. HUDSON, B.A., Hollins College; M.S., Ph.D., Tulane Uni- 
versity; Professor of Mathematics 



*Part-time. 
200 



ALPHIA MILLS HUGHES, B.S.E., State College of Arkansas; M.S., 
Louisiana State University; Catalog Ldbrarian, Assistant Professor of 
Library Science 

GEORGE S. HUNNICUTT, B.S., M.S., East Tennessee State Univer- 
sity; Registrar 

MICHAEL L. JAYNES, B.A., Appalachian State University; M.S.. 
University of North Carolina-Greensboro; Instructor in Physics 

MARVIN V.JENKINS, B.S., M.A., University of Georgia; Assistant 
Professor of English 

JAMES LAND JONES, B.A., University of Tulsa; M.A., Vanderbilt 
University; Ph.D., Tulane University; Professor of Et/glish 

OTIS S. JOHNSON, A.B., University of Georgia; M.S.W., Atlanta 
University; Assistant Professor of Sociology, Savannah State College, 
SSC Director of the Social Work Program 

CAROLAW. KELLER, B.S.N., University of Virginia; M.S.N., Medi- 
cal College of Georgia; Assistayit Professor of Nursing 

DALE Z. KILHEFNER, B.S., Elizabethtown College; M.Ed., Wash- 
ington State University; M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., The Pennsylva- 
nia State University; Associate Professor of Mathematics 

JOSEPH I. KILLORIN, A.B., St. John's College; M.A., Ph.D., Colum- 
bia University; Calloway Professor of Literature and Philosophy 

♦DOROTHY L. KLUTZ, B.S.N. , University of Virginia; Instructor in 
Nursing 

VIRGINIA S. KNORR, B.S., University of Tennessee (Chattanooga); 
M.S., University of Tennessee (Knoxville); Assistant Professor of Physi- 
cal Education 

JOSEPH M. LANE, JR., B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia; 
Associate Professor of Psychology 

OSMOS LANIER,' JR., B.A., LaGrange College; M.A., Auburn Uni- 
versity; Ph.D., University of Georgia; Professor of History 

MICHAEL L. LARISCY, B.S., Armstrong State College; M.Ed., 
Georgia Southern College; Instructor in Physical Education 

CORNELIA V. LAWSON, B.S., Florida State University; M.Ed., 
University of Southern Mississippi; Ed.D., University of Arkansas; Asso- 
ciate Professor of Education 

CHARLES J.' LESKA, B.A., LeMoyne College; M.A., University of 
Vermont; Ph.D., Syracuse University; Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics 

NETTIE M. LEVETT, B.S.N. , Florida A & M University: M.S.N., 
Medical College of Georgia; Assistant Professor of Nursing 

MARGARETS. LUBS.B.Mus., Converse Cnllege:H. A.. University of 
Georgia; M.A., Columbia University; Professor Emeritus of English and 
French 

C. STUART MACLEAN, B.S., East Tennessee State University; 
M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian Education; M.S.W., Virginia 
Commonwealth University; Instructor in Social Work and Sociology. 
Field Work Coordinator (Joint Appointment - Armstrong State 
College/Savannah State Colli 

•Part-time. 

201 



JOHN C. MCCARTHY, JR., B.B.A., University of Miami; M.B.A., 
Ph.D., University of Georgia; Professor of Political Science 

THOMAS C. McCRACKEN, B.S., Florida State University; 
M.A.L.S., University of Denver; Media Coordinator and Instructional 
Development Librarian, Assistant Professor of Library Science 

ROBERT E. MAGNUS, B.G.E., University of Omaha; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
Mississippi State University; Associate Professor of Criminal Justice 

CAROLE M. MASSE Y, B.S., M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia; 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

WILLIAM L. MEGATHLIN, B.A., Presbyterian College; M.Ed., 
Ed.D., University of Georgia; Head, Department of Criminal Justice, 
Professor of Criminal Justice 

GEORGE H. MENZEL, A.B., Franklin and Marshall College; J.D., 
Georgetown University; Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 

ETHEL J. MILLER, B.S., North Carolina A & T State University; 
B.S.L.S., Hampton Institute; Coordinator of Reader Services, Assistant 
Professor of Library Science 

MARY M. MILLER, B.S.N., Medical College of Virginia; M.S.N., 
Georgia Medical College; Assistant Professor of Nursing 

THOMAS P. MILLER, B.A., Armstrong State College; M.Ed., Geor- 
gia Southern College; Director of Admissions and Recruitment 

RICHARD E. MUNSON, B.A., Houghton College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Rutgers University; Associate Professor of Mathematics 

PEGGY A. NADALICH, B.M.E., University of Southern Mississippi; 
M.M.E., Florida State University; Assistant Professor of Music 

CHARLES R. NASH, B.S., Jackson State University; M.Ed., Univer- 
sity of Southern Mississippi; D.Ed., Mississippi State University; Profes- 
sor of Education and Dean of the School of Education 

JAMES S. NETHERTON, B.S., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Virginia; Associate Professor of Mathematics 

SAMUEL L. NEWBERRY, JR., B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., University of 
Georgia; Professor of Education 

JOHN F. NEWMAN, B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., George- 
town University; Ph.D., University of Florida; Professor of Political 
Science 

**DAVID A. NOBLE, A.B., A.M., Boston University; Ph.D., McGill 
University, Associate Professor of German 

VICKI G. NORWICH, B.S., Middle Tennesse State University; Coor- 
dinator, Short Courses and Conferences 

TIMOTHY A. O'HIGGINS, Diploma, B.A., University College, 
Dublin, Ireland; Ph.D., University of Tennessee; Temporary Assistant 
Professor of Psychology 

JACK H. PADGETT, A.B., Wofford College; M.A., University of 
North Carolina; Assistant Professor of Mathematics (Special Studies) 

ELLIOTH. PALEFSKY, B.S., University of Georgia; Ed.M., Temple 
University; Ed.S. , Georgia Southern College; Assistant Professor of Psy- 
chology 



**On leave. 
202 



JANE A. PATCHAK, B.A., Central Michigan University; M. A., West- 
ern Michigan Univrsity; Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Sociol- 
ogy 

ROBERT M. PATTERSON, B. A., Kentucky Wesleyan College; M.A., 
University of Kentucky; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University; Associate Profes- 
sor of History 

HUGHPENDEXTER, III, A.B., Bowdoin College; M.A., Northwest- 
ern University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Head, Department of 
Languages and Literature, Professor of English 

W. RAY PERSONS, B.S., Armstrong State College; J.D., Ohio State 
University; Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice 

J. HARRY PERSSE, B.F. A., University of Georgia; M.M., D.Mus., 
Florida State University; Head, Department of Fine Arts, Professor of 
Music 

BEVERLY C. PESTEL,B.A., Cedarville College; M.S., Wright State 
University; Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

ALLEN L. PINGEL, B.A., M.A.T., University of North Carolina; 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina; Associate Professor of Biology 

**H. DEAN PROPST, B.A., Wake Forest College; M.A., Ph.D., 
Peabody College; Vice President a)id Dean of Faculty, Professor of En- 
glish 

ARTHUR 0. PROSSER, B.S., University of Maryland; Comptroller 

DAN H. RADEBAUGH, B.A., M.M., University of South Florida; 
Assistant Professor of Music 

MARY MARGARET RALSTON, A.B., Florida State University; 
M.S.W., Tulane University; Assista nt Professor of Social Work and Soci- 
ology 

VIRGINIA RAMSEY, A.B., Vanderbilt University; M.A.T., Emory 
University; Assistant Professor of English 

JAMES F. REPELLA, Diploma, Pennsylvania Hospital School of 
Nursing for Men; B.S.Ed., Temple University; M.S.N. , University of 
Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Dean of the School of 
Human Services, Professor of Nursing 

JOE H. RESTIVO, B.S., Central State University; M.S., Stephen F. 
Austin State University; Instructor in Biology 

STEVE YOUNG RHEE, B.A., M.A., University of Oregon; Ph.D., 
University of Missouri-Columbia; Assistant Professor of Political Science 

PAULE. ROBBINS, B.S., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Georgia 
Institute of Technology; Professor of Chemistry 

AURELIA D. ROBINSON, A.B., Spelman College; M.A., Atlanta 
University; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma; Professor of Education 

♦CAROL S. RUSSELL, A.S., Armstrong State College; Cluneal 
Teaching Associate in Dental Hygiene 

GERALDS. SANDY, B. A., Youngstown State University; M.S.L.S., 
Florida State University; Director of Library v and Assistant 

Professor of Library Science 

*Part-time. 
**0n leave. 



HERMAN W. SARTOR, B.S, South Carolina. State College; M.S., 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Professor of Education 

NEIL B. SATTERFIELD, A.B., University of North Carolina; 
M.S.S.W., University of Tennessee; Ed.D., University of Georgia; ASC 
Director of Social Work Program and Associate Professor of Social Work 
and Sociology 

CHARLES T. SHIPLEY, B.A., University of North Dakota; M.S., 
Georgia Institute of Technology; M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska; 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 

ELAINE SILCOX, B.S., M.Ed., University of Florida; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

EMMA ANN THERESA SIMON, A.S., B.S. inD.H. Ed., Armstrong 
State College; M.H.Ed., Medical College of Georgia; Assistant Professor 
of Dental Hygiene 

ROY J. SIMS, B.S., David Lipscomb College; M.S., University of 
Tennessee; Ed.D., Louisiana State University; Head, Department of 
Physical Education and Athletics; Professor of Physical Education 

DeLARRISA. SMITH, B.S., University of Alabama; M.S., University 
of Alabama (Birmingham); Assistant Professor of Nursing 

PATRICIA M. SMITH, B.S.N., Catholic University; M.S.N., Medical 
College of Georgia; Assistant Professor of Nursing 

JULE R. STANFIELD, A. A., Armstrong State College; Vice Presi- 
dent for Business and Finance 

JACQUELINE W. STEPHENS, B.S., Savannah State College; M.S., 
Illinois State University; Ed.D., University of Oklahoma; Associate Pro- 
fessor of Education 

ERICH F. STOCKER, B.A., M.A., Ohio State University; Director of 
Development and Assistant to the President 

*LOIS M. STODGHILL, B.S., Marquette University; Instructor in 
Nursing 

MAURICE S. STOKES, B.S., M.S., Kansas State Teachers College; 
Associate Professor of Education 

WILLIAM W. STOKES, B.A.Ed., M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Flor- 
dia; Professor of Education and Head of the Department of Secondary and 
Special Education 

JANET D. STONE, A.B., Randolph-Macon Women's College; M.A., 
Purdue University; Ph.D., Emory University; Assistant Professor of 
History 

CEDRIC STRATTON, B.Sc, Nottingham University, England; 
Ph.D., University of London; Professor of Chemistry 

ROBERT I. STROZIER, A.B., University of Georgia; M. A., Ph.D., 
Florida State University; Professor of English 

JOHN SUCHOWER, B.A., Fairfield University; M.A., University of 
Detroit; Assistant Professor of English and Speech; Director of the "Mas- 
quers" 

JOAN M. SULLIVAN, B.S.N. , Armstrong State College; M.S.N. , 
Medical College of Georgia; Assistant Professor of Nursing 



*Part-time. 
204 



CAROLE E. SUMMERVILLE, B.S., Clarion State College; M.S., 
Syracuse University; Assistant Professor of Mathematics (Special Stu- 
dies) 

RICHARD M. SUMMERVILLE, B.S., Clarion State College; A.M.. 
Washington University; Ph.D., Syracuse University; Head, Department 
of Mathematics a>id Computer Science, Professor of Mathematics 

JOSEPH W. SUMNER, B.A., Wake Forest University; M.S.. North 
Carolina State University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina; B.D., 
Southeastern Baptist Seminary; Professor of Education 

RUTHE. SWINSON, B.S.Ed., Georgia Southern College; M.A.L.S., 
Peabody College; Reference Librarian, Assistant Professor of Library 
Science 

BARBARA G. TANENBAUM, B.S., Medical College of Georgia; As- 
sistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 

LAWRENCE M. TAPP, B.S., M.S., Ed.D., University ofTenne* 
Associate Professor of Physical Education 

CLAUDIA A. THOMAS, B.A., Furman University; M.Ed., Ed.D.. 
University of Georgia; Assistant Professor of Education 

FRANCIS M. THORNE, III, B.S. , Stetson University; Ph. I). , Univer- 
sity of Georgia; Professor of Biology 

PAUL E. WARD, B.S., Georgia Teachers College; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
University of Georgia; Professor of Education 

ROGER K.WARLICK,B. A., Arizona State University; Ph.D., Boston 
University; Head, Department of History and Political Science, Professor 
of Hist ort) 

JOHNA. WELSH, III, A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Vanderbilt 
University; Assistant Professor of English 

SUSAN S. WHITE, B.S., Winthrop College; M.Ed., University of 
South Carolina; Assistant Professor of Speech Correction 

CHARLES C. WHITE, B.S., East Carolina College; M.A., Southern 
Illinois University; Assista)it Professor of English 

MORRIS L. WHITEN, B.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia; Associate 
Professor of Physics 

JANE B. WILLIAMSON, Diploma, Georgia Baptist School of Nursing; 
B.S.N.E., University of Georgia; M.Ed., Georgia Southern Coll. 
M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia; Assistant Professor of Nursing 

WILLIAMS. WINN, B.D., A.B., Emory University; M.A.. Univer- 
sity of North Carolina; Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

JAMES WINTERS, B.B.A., Armstrong State College; Director of 
Studoit Financial Aid and Veterans Affairs 

CLARKE S. WORTHINGTON, B.A., University of Arizona; M.A.. 
Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., Emory University; Head, Depart- 
ment of Psychology; Professor of Psychology 

ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: CrimiwaZ/tt*ttw - Walter B. 

Biondi, Elwyn M. Burnett, Clinton C. Covell, Jack G. Dunlap. Charles L. 
Eggleston, Gerard F. Finnegan, Charles T. Franssen, Franklin R. 
Graves, C. H. Harris, Jr., Thomas W. Hicks, Richard C. Krueger. George 
A. La Cas, Jr., Frank K. Littrell, Jr., Paul F. Mathis, Donald L. Newton. 

205 



David M. Rudman, Timothy H. Walker; Dental Hygiene — Earl C. He- 
wett, Alston J. McCaslin, William R. Massey, Harvey E. Matheny, Wil- 
liam Weichselbaum, Harold West; Nursing — Mary Elizabeth Faircloth. 

Armstrong College Commission 

The Commission controls certain endowment and scholarship funds. 
DR. IRVING VICTOR, Chairman 
MR. EDWARD BARTLETT 
MR. Y. A. BEALL, JR. 
MRS. KAY KOLE 
MR." JOHN RANITZ, JR. 
MR. JOSEPH BELL 

Ex-Officio 

DR. SYLVESTER RAINS 
SHELBY MYRICK, JR., The Honorable 
JOHN P. ROUSAKIS, The Honorable 
MRS. SAXON BARGERON 
MR. DAVID A. YOUNG 

Administrative Staff 

Office of the President: Sally A. Long 

Office of the Vice President and Dean of Faculty: Elizabeth H. Carter 

Office of the Vice President for Business and Finance: Bonnie Shaw, 
Richard R. Baker, Tom Williamson, Peggy Wilkins, Harry Humphries, 
Jean Olsen, Jane Holland, Launa Q. Johns, Thomas Nease, Cleo Olson, 
Dorothy Olson, Suzanne Beall, Diana Ghassemzadeh, Janice Shaloski, 
Augustus Stalnaker, Edward Urbanz, Zedna Donaldson 

Office of the Dean for Graduate and Extended Studies: Mary Chambers 

Office of the Dean for College and Community Services: A, Kathy Wood, 
Brenda Wilt, Sherra Edens 

Office of the Dean for Student Affairs: Alva Aliffi, Doris Cole, Belinda 
Gnann, Angela Lincoln, Naomi Lantz, Laura Maffia, Jo Weeks 

Department of Special Studies: Gale McKenzie 

School of Arts and Sciences: Kathleen Orzada, Virginia Barry, Alethia 
Gadsden, Joyanne Harden, Alice Sheplar, Dianne A. Wagner, Ethel 
Brown, Lois Wheeler 

School of Education: Frances McGlohon, Gerry Price, Deborah Anderson, 
Donna Ingle, Linda Clark, Lou Frazier 

School of Human Services: Patricia Fink, Faye Pingel, Anna Chidester, 
Elizabeth Molpus, Lorraine Warlick, Carol Griffin, Sandra Wiggins 

Library: Jan Bosque, Diane Bacon, Susie Chibras, Thomas Johnson, Jean 
Meyer, Gail Brannen, Elizabeth Smith, Norman Spencer, Beatrice Tay- 
lor, Peggy Lambeth 

Office of the Registrar: Katherine Etersque, Miriam Fulton, Beatrice 
Jones, Mary Cody, Marian Malac, Joyce Weldy, Patricia Reese 

Office of Assistant to the President: Norma Bennett, Betty Hunnicutt 

Office of Computer Services: Janice Christy 

206 



Appendix 

Policy 
Regents' Testing Program 

An examination to assess the competency level in reading and writing of 

those students enrolled in degree programs in University System institu- 
tions will be administered. The following statement shall be the policy of 
the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia on this examina- 
tion. 

It is the responsibility of each institution of the University System of 
Georgia to assure the other institutions, and the System as a whole, that 
students obtaining a degree from that institution possess the basic compe- 
tence of academic literacy, that is, certain minimum skills of reading and 
writing. 

The Regents' Testing Program has been developed to help in the attain- 
ment of this goal. The objectives of the testing program are: (1) to provide 
System-wide information on the status of student competence in the areas 
of reading and writing; and (2) to provide a uniform means of identifying 
those students who fail to attain minimum levels of competence expected of 
graduates in the areas of reading and writing. 

In order to implement effectively the goals of the Testing Program: 

1. Students enrolled in degree programs will be required to take and 
pass the Regents' Test. Passing the Test is a requirement for graduation. 
Students may take the Test after they have completed the required basic 
core English courses. They will be required to take the Test in the quarter 
after they have completed their 45th degree quarter-hour if it has not been 
taken and passed previously. Students who have not passed the Test by 
the time they have earned 75 quarter-credit hours (exclusive of physical 
education activity courses and R.O.T.C.) must give priority to taking 
remedial or review English, reading, and writing courses until they pass 
the Test. Each institution is directed to develop procedures that will 
require its students to pass the Regents' Test prior to being classified as a 
junior-year student. Students who have not passed the Regents' Test by 
the time they have earned 105 quarter-credit hours (excluding physical 
education activity courses and R.O.T.C) must be denied taking further 
credit courses and be limited to taking only remedial or review English, 
reading, and writing courses until they do pass the Regents' Test. 

2. Having passed the Regents' Test shall not be a condition to transfer 
into an institution. All transfers within the System will be subject to 
Paragraph 1, above. Students from colleges outside the System who 
transfer into a System institution in the lower-division category and who 
have not passed the Test must do so in accordance with Paragraph 1. 
above. Students who transfer into an institution from outside the System 
in the classification of junior or senior and who have not passed the 
Regents' Test must take the Test in the first quarter of their attendance. If 
they fail the Test, they must be restricted to taking remedial or review 
courses in English, reading, and writing until they have passed the Re- 
gents' Test. 

•>o- 



3. Students whose mother tongue is other than English may be ex- 
empted by the institution provided appropriate local procedures are em- 
ployed to certify the competence of those students earning a degree. 

4. The test is to be considered as a single unit and will be administered 
as such; passing the Test is defined as scoring above the cutoff on all 
components of the Test at the same administration. 

5. Students who fail the Test must retake and pass the Test. Each 
institution will provide an appropriate program of remediation and may 
require deficient students to participate in the program prior to retaking 
the Test. 

6. For extraordinary situations, each institution will develop special 
procedures for certifying the competency of students. A written descrip- 
tion of these procedures will be submitted to the Chancellor's Office for 
approval. Such procedures will include provision for remediation if needed 
and formal examination prior to certifying competency. Such examination 
will equal or exceed the standards of the Regents' Testing Program. 

7. Each institution shall include in its catalog a copy of the Regents' 
policy on the Regents' Testing Program. 

8. These revised procedures shall be followed by all students, effective 
July 1, 1979. 



208 



Index 

Academic Advisement 50 

Academic Regulations 50 

Accelerated Program, High School 37 

Administration, Officers 1 97 

Admissions : 1 1 

Advanced Placement :;."> 

Alumni Office 21 

American Civilization Courses 11!* 

Anthropology Courses Ill 

Application Form :; 1 

Application Requirements 

Art Courses 96 

Associate in Arts 72 

Astronomy Course 

Athletics 22 

Attendance Regulations ."> 1 

Auditing 54 ; 

Bachelor of Arts Requirements 67 

Bachelor of Music Education Degree 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree, 

Physical Education 1 f>7 

Bachelor of Science Requirements <">7 

Biology Courses 76 

Biology Department 73 

Biology Requirements 7:; 

Botany Courses 77 

Calendar, Academic 7 

Chemistry, Courses v ^ 

Chemistry Degree Requirements v < I 

Chemistry and Physics Department v| I 

Clubs 2<) 

Commission. Armstrong State College 206 

Community Services/Continuing Education 11 

Comparative Literature Courses 120 

Computer Science, Courses in L37 

Computer Science, Program Concentration L32 

Computer Services, Office of 16 

Conditional Admission 

Conduct 17 

Core Curriculum, Associate Degrees 

Core Curriculum, Baccalaureate Degrees 62 

Core Curriculum, University System 62 

Counseling I s 

Course Load 52 

Course Offerings 000 

Credit by Examination 36 

Criminal Justice, A.S. and B.S. Degrees 175 

Criminal Justice Courses 177 

Criminal Justice Department 174 

Dean's List 54 

Degree Requirements, Regulations •"»' 

Degrees Offered 13, 71. 1 16, 164 

Dental Hygiene. A.S. Degree 16, L81 

Dental Hygiene Courses 1 sn 

2<>!* 



Dental Hygiene Department 46, 181 

Dental Hygiene Education, B.S. Degree r 185 

Dental Hygiene Services 21 

Development, Office of 15 

Drama/Speech Courses 120 

Dropping Courses 56 

Dual-Degree Programs, Georgia Tech 12 

Early Admission Program 37 

Education Courses 152 

Education Degree Requirements, Early Elementary 

(Middle School) 146, 150 

English Courses 121 

English Degree Requirements 117 

Entomology Course 78 

Evening Classes 14 

Exemption Examinations (See Advanced Placement) 

Exit Examinations 66 

Faculty 197 

Fees 23 

Financial Aid 26 

Fine Arts Department 88 

Foreign Students 40 

French Courses 125 

Geography Course 112 

Geology Course 86 

German Courses 126 

Government Benefits 30 

Graduate Program 13 

Health 21 

History of College 11 

History Courses . ■ 103 

History Degree Requirements 99 

History and Political Science Department 97 

Honor System 56 

Honors 54 

Housing 22 

Intern Programs 14 

Intramurals 22 

Joint Enrollment Program 39 

Journalism Courses 128 

Languages and Literature Department 116 

Latin Courses 127 

Library 17 

Library Science Courses 155 

Linguistics Courses 129 

Marine Officer Program 16 

Marine Science Center, Skidaway Island 80 

Mathematics Major Requirements 131 

Mathematics Courses 132 

Mathematics and Computer Science Department 130 

Mathematics Education, Degree Concentration 132 

Medical Record Technology, Courses and Degree 186 

Medical Technology 75 



210 



Mental Health Work, Courses 142 

Meteorology ( bourse 86 

Minors, Academic 72, 165 

Music Courses 91 

Music Degree Requirements 

Neighborhood Continuing Education ( Jenter 15 

NROTC Program 10 

Nursing, A.S. Department VI, 165 

Nursing, B.S. Department 11. 168 

Nursing Courses 166 

Nursing Degree Requirements, A.S 165 

Nursing Degree Requirements, B.S 170 

Oceanography Course 

Organizations, Student 20 

Orientation lit 

Out-of-State Tuition 23 

Philosophy Courses 13 

Physical Education Courses 158 

Physical Education, Degree Requirements 101 

Physical P^lucation Department 194 

Physical Education Requirements, All Students 00 

Physical Science Courses 

Physics Courses -7 

Placement, Office of lit 

Placement Tests, Emglish and Mathematics 07 

Political Science Courses 1 1 '1 

Political Science Degree Requirements 101 

Pre-Professional Programs 12 

Probation and Dismissal -V> 

Program Exchange, ASC/SSC 1 17 

Psychology Courses 11:; 

Psychology Degree Requirements 11" » 

Publications, Student lil 

Purpose of College 11 

Reading ( bourses To 

Readmission of Former Students 

Refunds of Fees 25 

Regents Examination 0.~>. li"7 

Regents, University System 196 

Regents. Staff 196 

Registration I s 

Regular Admission 

Repeating Courses 

Reports and Grades 

Residency Requirements I s 

Respiratory Therapy, Courses and Degree l sx 

Russian ( bourses 1 -'7 

Scholarships -~ 

School of Arts and Sciences 71 

School of Education 146 

School of Human Services 164 

Senior Citizen, Policy 11 

Short Courses, Fees _'•"> 

Social Work Courses 1**1 

Social Work Degree 190 

211 



Sociology Courses 194 

Spanish Courses * 128 

Special Studies, Department of 69 

Speech Courses (See Drama/Speech Courses) 

Staff, Administrative 206 

State Requirements, History and Government 67 

Student Activity Fee 23 

Student Conduct 19 

Student Exchange Program, Savannah State College 16 

Student Government 21 

Student Services and Activities 18 

Student Teaching 149 

Teacher Education, Requirements 147 

Testing Services 18 

Two-year Degrees 13 

Transfer Applicants, Requirements 37 

Transient Students 38 

Veterans 18, 30, 40 

Vocational Rehabilitation , 30, 42 

Withdrawal 56 

Zoology Courses 78 



212 



1. Administration Building 

2. Victor Hall 

3. Gamble Hall 

4. Science Hall 

5. Solms Hall 

6. Jenkins Hall 

7. Student Services 

8. Memorial College Center 

9. Lane Library 

10. Fine Arts Building 

11. Health Professions Education Center 

12. Maintenance Building 

13. Gymnasium and Pool 

14. Parking Area 

15. Tennis Courts 

16. Baseball and Intramural Field 




j &~ * s SlElli^ft>£gS 



A B E RC OR 



STREET 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE CAMPUS 



-A 



in 

0) 


~ 


* 


3 


5 


3 

it 


0) 


0) 




3 
CQ 


O 


3 


C/) 


0) 



o 


$ 


c3 


p 


a> 


5' 


c/?n 




q- o 


U> 


o> 


— — 


>— 4 


a> 


0) 


^ 


r+ 


en 


o 




<U 


O)